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X>3'7L 



Keramic Studio 

A MONTHLY MAGAZINE FOR THE 

CHINA PAINTER AND 

POTTER 



Volume Fifteen 

A/[AY 1913 to APRIL 1914, INCLUSIVE 



KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO. 
SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

(.'/// Rights Reserved) 






X^^6%^ 



RERAMIC STUDIO— Index 



FLOWER STUDIES— NATURALISTIC AND DECORATIVE 



MAY 1913 

Single White Chrysanthemum Photo by Walter Stilhnan.. 

Morning Glory L. M. Snell 

Decorative Landscape A. W. Donaldson 

Peony Photo by Walter Stillman.. 

Golden Harvest Peony Photo by Waher Stillman.. 

Buddleya. Photo by Walter Stilhnan.. 

Pine Cones , Harriette B. Burt 



PAGE 

3 
13 
15 

17 
21 
23 
24 



PAGE 

Sugar Tree and Butternut Hannah B. Overbeck 146 

Butternut and Water Beech Hannah B. Overbeck 147 

Red and White Oak Hannah B. Overbeck 148-149 

Black Walnut, Cockspur Thorn and 

Hop Tree Hannah B. Overbeck 150 

Hop Tree, Pleta Trifoliata Hannah B. Overbeck 151 

Judas Tree, Red Bud Hannah B. Overbeck 152 



JUNE 1913 

Scarlet and Crimson Oriental Poppies. Photo by Waher Stillman.. 

Snap Dragon Photo by Walter Stillman.. 

Jack-in-the-Pulpit Lucy M. Shover 

Bleeding Heart Hannah B. Overbeck 

Virginia Creeper Wm. G. Whitford.. 



31 
35 
37 
41 

Hollyhocks '. Photo by Walter Stillman 44-45 



JULY 1913 

Wistaria Mary H. Fewsmith 

Flower Borders Ruth M. Ruck 

Cactus Dahhas Photo by Walter Stillman 

Tulip Tree Blossoms Ahce B. Sharrrard 54- 

Arbutus A. W. Heckman - 

Crimson Colla.rette Dahha Photo by Walter Stillman 

Sand Buttercups A, W. Donaldson 

Tulip Tree A. W. Donaldson 

Pompon Dahha Photo by Walter StiUman 

Scarlet and Orange Dahlias Photo by Walter Stillman 

AUGUST 1913 

Red Clover C. L. Wiard 

Japanese Tomato Berries Drusiila Paist 

Detail Drawings of Japanese Tomato 

Berries Drusiila Paist 

Study of Violets Helena E. Hanscom 

Violet Buds, Leaf and Flowers Helena E. Hanscom. 

Butter and Eggs Helena E. Hanscom.. 

Trumpet Creeper Wm. G. Whitford.. 



S3 
90 
91 



SEPTEMBER 1913 



97 
99 



DECEMBER 1913 

Holly Alice W. Donaldson.. 

Checkerberry Edith A. Ross 

Elderberry Wm. G. Whitford 

Bluet A. W. Heckman 



Negundo Acaroides Box Elder Hannah B. Overbeck 92-93 



Japanese Lantern Plant C. L. Wiard 

Fish Studies Edna M. Shover 

Thorn Vine Ahce W. Donaldson 101 

Cineraria Ida Upton Paine 103 

Cahfornia Poppies Helena E. Hanscom Ill 

OCTOBER 1913 

Blossom Panel Ahce Seymour 119 

Acorns Edith A. Ross 121 

NOVEMBER 1913 

The Wild Turkey Edna Mann Shover 140 

Trilhum A. W. Heckman 142 

Bitter Sweet Berries J. Slocomb 145 



108 

108 

109 

110 

Choke Cherry C. L. Wiard 115 

Panel, Composition, Wild Rose Henrietta B. Paist 116 

Wild Rose Details Henrietta B. Paist 118 

Autumn Leaves and Berries Jane P. Baker 123 

JANUARY 1914 

Begonia Hannah B. Overbeck 133 

Anemone Virginiana Hannah B. Overbeck 138 

Japanese Anemone C. L. Wiard 139 

x\nemone Mary Burnett 142 

New Jersey Meadow Weed Ahce W. Donaldson 143 

Bird Studies Edna Mann Shover 144 

Dogwood Blossoms M. Phillips 147 

FEBRUARY 1914 

Phlox Elise Talley 156 

Three Book Plates 156 

Phlox Ahce W. Morse 159 

Chrysanthemum Russell Goodwin 162 

Grapes Jeanne M. Stewart 163 

Evening Primrose Hannah B. Overbeck 168-169 

Acorns Mary Burnett 174 

Cobaea Dorothy Putzki 175 

MARCH 1914 

Altheas Dorothy Putzki 

Wild Geranium A, W. Heckman 

Petunia Mary Burnett 

TaU Bell Flower Hannah B. Overbeck 

APRIL 1914 



189 
190 
193 
201 



Bird Panels adapted from the Jap- 
anese Henrietta B. Paist 204-205-207 

Bird Placque, adapted from the Jap- 
anese Henrietta B. Paist 206 

Bitter Sweet Study IsabeUe C. Kissinger 208 

Plantain Lily Lena E. Hanscom 211 

Dogwood R- E. Saunier 213 

Nightshade M. H. Watkeys 214 

Narcissus Jane P. Baker 217 

Iris Hannah B. Overbeck 219 

Jonquils Jane P. Baker 221 



CONVENTIONAL 



JUNE 1913 



Cup and Saucer Jetta Ehlers 

Cup and Saucer Albert HeCkman 

Dinner Set Albert Heckman 

Plate Henrietta B. Paist 

Egg Cup A. Lingley 

Fruit Bowl Leah H. Rodman.. 

Chicken Plate Ophelia Foley 

Honey Jar Sarah R. Comer 

Plate Eula L. McElhinney, 

Dinner Set Eleanor Stewart 

Bowl Laurence Colvin 

Bowl Henrietta B. Paist 



2 

4 
5 
6 
11 
11 
12 
14 
Ifi 
18-19 
18 
20 



Pitcher Henrietta B. Paist 

Cream Pitcher M. W. Caudle 

Round Box Ahce Seymour 

Fish Platter Russell Goodwin 

Sandwich Tray Paula Fenska 

Conventional Jack-in-the-Pulpit Lucy M. Shover 34 

Bleeding Heart, Vase and Platter Hannah B. Overbeck 36-37 

Bleeding Heart, Bowl and Milk Pitcher Hannah B. Overbeck 38 

Bleeding Heart, Salt or Pepper Shaker 

and Plates Hannah H. Overbeck 39 

Bleeding Heart, Cup and Saucer and 

Biscuit Jar..., Hannah B. Overbeck 40 



HERAMIC SrUDlO-Index 



CONVENTIONAL— Contintied 



Bouillon Cup and Saucer Clara L. Connor.. 

Chop Plate Olga Sorensen 



PAGE 

42 
43 



JULY 1918 

Plate Border Mrs Robert D. Haire 50 

Decorative Plate Pearl Monro 50 

Cups and Saucers Kathryn E. Cherry 51 

Tile, in Blue and Gold Laurence Colvin 52 

Bird Design for Satsuma Bowl F. R. Weiskopf. 53 

Conventional Suggestions for Arbutus. A. W. Heckman 57 

Plate, Arbutus Motif A. W. Heckman 58 

Salad Set, Cucumber Motif Henrietta B. Paist 60-61 

Tobacco Jar Hallie Day 62 

Owl Plate Ophelia Foley 69 

AUGUST 1913 

Cups and Saucers Kathryn E. Chen-y 75 

Designs from the Japanese Tomato 

Berry Drusilla Paist 

Plate or Rehsh Dish Drusilla Paist 

Plate and Bands, Japanese Tomato 

Berry Motif Drusilla Paist 

Cup and Saucer Mary H. Fewsmith 

Rabbit Border S. R. Comer 

Plate and Border Henrietta B. Paist 

Cup and Saucer Helena E. Hanscom 

Border Margaret Latham 

Panel Henrietta B. Paist 

Bowl or Plate Border Cora E. Tilden 

Bowl Clara L. Connor 

Borders '. Ruth M. Ruck 

Wild Rose Conventional Border Kate C. Green 

Pine Cone Motif Border Hallie Day 

Lunch Set, Cup and Saucer Alice B. Sharrard 

Borders Margai-et Latham 



SO 
SO 

81 
82 
83 
84 
84 
84 
85 
86 
87 
88 
88 
88 
89 
92 



SEPTEMBER 1913 

Breakfast Set A. W. Heckman 104-105 

Tea Caddy and Bowl, Nasturtiums Hannah B. Overbeck 106 

Tray, Nasturtiums Hannah B. Overbeck 107 

Plates and Tea pot, Nasturtiums Hannah B. Overbeck 108 

Plate Borders, Nasturtiums Hannah B. Overbeck 109 

Pitcher, Nasturtiums Hannah B. Overbeck 110 

Study and Design for Ground Cherries.. Henrietta B. Paist 112 

Peach Border Motif Abbott McClure 112 

Border of Baskets Abbott McClure 112 

Panel, Ground Cherries Henrietta B. Paist 113 

Punch Bowl Celia C. Pope 114 

Cups and Saucers Kathrjm E. Cherry 115 

Tea Tile Clara L. Connor 116 

Bowl with Floral Motif Clara L. Connor 116 

OCTOBER 1913 

Conventionalized Fig Design for Fruit 

Bowl E. L. McElhinney US 

Designs for Nursery Sets Utica Free Academy 122-125 

Scrap Plate Katharine W. Lindspy 126 

Plate IdaC. Faihng 126 

Hallowe'en Plate Cards Alice B. Sharrard 127 

Four Winds Summer School 128-137 

Vase, Moccasin Flower Florence Huntington 137 

Breakfast Set Jetta Ehlers 138 

NOVEMBER 1913 

Chop Plate, Turkeys Alice B. Sharrard 141 

Conventional Suggestions, TriUium A. W. Heckman 143 

Plate Border and Center, TriUiuni A. W. Heckman 144 

Bowl A. W. Heckman 144 

Salt Shaker Elma S. Ritter 144 

Plate Mrs. Robert D. Haire 144 

Fruit Plate May B. Hoelscher 153 

Dinner Set Katharine W. Lindsey 154-155 

Rabbit Mug Doris D. Mills 156 



PAGE 

Cup and Saucer Sarah R. Comer 156 

Child's Pitcher H. L. Bridwell 157 

Child's Mug M. B. Hoelscher '.'.. 157 

Child's Cup A. V. Lingley 157 

Fish Platter Ophelia Foley 158-159 

Plate Hannah B. Overbeck 160 

DECEMBER 1913 

Satsuma Boxes and Bowls A. W. Heckman Ill 

Tea Caddy and Sugar Bowl, Bluet A. W. Heckman 112 

Cups, Saucers and Plates, Bluet A. W. Heckman 113-114 

Wild Rose Units to be Adapted Henrietta B. Paist 117 

Wild Rose Motif Henrieteta B. Paist 119 

Wild Rose Motif Henrietta B. Paist 120 

Details of the Supplement, Black-eyed 

Susan Henrietta B. Paist 121 

Mistletoe and Holl\-, Designs for Trin- 
ket Boxes Henrietta B. Paist 122 

Holly Design for Bon Bon Box Georgia Spainhower 122 

Holly Design for Salt and Pepper in 

p]namels Leah Rodman 122 

Holly Design for Photo Frame in En- 
amels Leah Rodman 122 

Mistletoe Design for Nut Bowl Georgia B. Spainhower 127 

Designs of Mistletoe Abbie P. Walker 127 

Holly Plate Mrs. W. C. McDonough 128 

Mistletoe and Holly Hallie Day 129 

Holly Design for Cup and Saucer Georgia Spainhower 129 

Fruit Plate, Apples Florence Milton 130 

JANUARY 1914 

Fernery, Bleeding Heart Motif Clara L. Connor 134 

Bowl Border in Horse Chestnuts Doris D. Mills 134 

Dinner Set A. W. Heckman 135-136 

136 

137 

140 

141 
145 



Cup and Saucer Anna V. Lingley 

Plate Anna V. Lingley 

Cup and Saucer and Plate Lillie Peterson 

Jardiniere Hannah B. Overbeck.. 

Fish Design for Plate May B. Hoelscher.. 



Pitcher, AVild Asters Alice Seymour 146 

Border Ida C. Failing 

Border Ruth M. Ruck 

Border Margaret Latham 

Border Clara L. Connor 

Jar with Tigers Katherine W. Lindsey 

Tiger Tobacco Jar Florence A. Huntington 

Finger Bowl Ida C. Failing 

Bowl Design Mabelle K. Wells 

Cup and Saucer O. E. Miner 

Border Kate Clark Green 



148 
148 
148 
148 
148 
149 
150 
152 
153 
153 



FEBRUARY 1914 



Borders Pupils Four Winds Summer 

School 158 

AU-Over Patterns from Phlox Pupils of Summer School 160 

Medallions, Phlox Motif... Mrs. A. B. Smith 161 

Garden Motifs Ehse Talley 161 

Adajjtation of Flower Motifs to differ- 
ent Spaces Pupils of Summer School 164-167 

Flower and Fruit Motifs Pupils of Summer School 170-173 

Panels from Phlox Pupils of Summer School 176 

Gourd Motifs Pupils of Summer School 177 

MARCH 1914 

Mush and Small Bowls A. W. Heckman 191 

Wild Geranium Dresser Set A. W. Heckman 192 

Phlox Motifs and Panels Pupils of Summer School 194-195 

Adaptation of Flower Motifs to difi'er- 

ent Spaces Pupils of Summer School 196-197 

Flower and Fruit Motifs Miss J. Jackson and Mrs. A. B. 

Smith 198 

Garden Motifs ,....,-,.,., Elise Talley 199 

Medallions Myrtle McCoy and J. Jackson.. 199 

Borders from Phlox Mrs. Browne 199 

Ail-Over Pattern, Phlox Alice Morse 200 



KERAMIC STUDIO— Index 



CONVENTIONAL— Continued 



APRIL 1914 

Low Fruit Bowl and Fruit Plate Isabelle C. Kissinger... 

Cup and Saucer, Border and Units Isabelle C. Kissinger... 

Chocolate Cup and Saucer Bertha Herbert 

Conventional Suggestion for Night- 
shade M. H. Watkeys 



PAGE PAGE 

Vase, Nightshade ]\L H. Watkeys... 216 

Punch Bowl Hannah B. Overbeck 218 

209 High Bowl Hannah B. Overbeck 219 

210 Chocolate Pot, Iris Hannah B. Overbeck 220 

212 Vase, Iris Hannah B. Overbeck 222 

Low Bowl, Iris Hannah B. Overbeck 223 

215 Choke Cherry 224 



MISCELLANEOUS 



MAY 1913 

Exhibition of the Keramic Society of 

Greater New York 

Helpful Hints Gertrude Gilpin.. 

A Page of Crafts from St. Louis School 

of Fine Arts 



7-11 

20 



JUNE 1913 



OCTOBER 1913 

Modern Chinese and Japanese Over- 
glaze Decoration Mary Churchill Ripley Weisse 120-122 

DECEMBER 1913 

Burley & Co.'s Exhibition 124-127 

JANUARY 1914 

132 



Work of Orilla E, Miner and Class, 

Pullman Wash 30 Newark Class in China Decoration M. M. Mason 

Helpful Hints.' ZZZZZZZZZormiiMmeT^^^ 43 Exhibition of Chicago Ceramic Asso- 
ciation 150-15 J 

JULY 1913 

FEBRUARY 1914 
Technical Study on the Decoration of 

Art Ceramics Louis Franchel 64-66-68 Four Winds Summer School, Faculty 

and Classes 157 

AUGUST 1913 

T, . . , „, , ,, ^ ,. , MARCH 1914 

lechnical Study on the Decoration of 

Art Ceramics, continued Louis Franchet 72-74-76-78 Exhibition of National Society of 

Craftsmen, New York 180-187 

Pottery Class, Four Winds Pottery 

Topeka Ceramic Art Club Exhibit 96 Summer School 188 

St. Mary's Academy and College, Port- 



SEPTEMBER 1913 



96 



APRIL 1914 



land. Ore., Exhibit.. 

Technical Study on the Decoration of How to Enlarge a Design Jessie M. Bard 204 

Art Ceramics, concluded Louis Franchet 98-100-102-104 Panama Pacific Exposition .,... 205 



SUPPLEMENTS 



Treatment on ]5age 

Cups and Saucers.. Kathryn E. Cherry May 1913 4 

Salmon Berry Jeanne M. Stewart June 1913 32 

Stein Florence Weiskopf July 1913 47 

Plate, Peacock Motif Alice B. Sharrard July 1913 48 

Scotch Thistles Jeanne M. Stewart August 1913 72 

Phisalis HarrietteB. Burt September 1913 112 

Texas Fail Flowers Alice W. Donaldson. .October 1913 136 



Treatment on page 

Parrot Tuhps Joseph Kallaus November 1913 152 

Teapot, Black-eyed Susan H. B. Paist December 1913 128 

Orchids Helen Becker January 1914 132 

Conventional Designs Four Winds School... February 1914 155 

Little Things to Make Kathryn E. Cherry March 1914 179 

Dogwood E. Sendcrling April 1914 212 



ERRATA: — The December folios begin with 107 instead of 167 which causes the repetition of 60 numbers. Noting the month as well as folio 

will obviate any trouble in finding what is wanted. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



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THE DIFFERENCE IN MEDIUMS 



'T^HE secret of success of many of the foremost china painters, in 
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Date of San Francisco class 
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The entire contents of this Magazine are covered by the general copyright, and the articles must not be reprmted without special permission 

CONTENTS OF MAY, J9I3 



Editorial Notes 

Cap and Saucer 

Single White Chrysanthemams 

Cttp and Saucer 

Cups and Saucers (Supplement) 

Dinner Set 

Plate 

Exhibition of Keramic Society of Greater New York 

Fruit Bowl 

Egg Cup 

Chicken Plate 

Morning Glory 

Honey Jar 

Decorative Landscape 

Plate, Conventionalized Fig 

Peony 

Dinner Set, Cup and Saucer 

Bowl 

Helpful Hints 

Bowl, Mushroom Motif 

Golden Harvest Peony 

A Page of Crafts from St. Louis School of Fine Arts 

Buddleya 

Pine Cones 

Answers to Correspondents 



Jetta Ehlers 

Photo by "Walter Stillman 

Albert Heckman 

K. E. Cherry 

Albert W. Heckman 

Henrietta B. Paist 

Dorothea "Warren O'Hara 

Leah H. Rodman 

A. Lingley 

Ophelia Foley 

L. M. Snefl 

Sarah Ryel Comer 

A. "W. Donaldson 

Eula L. McEIhinny 

Photo by "Walter S. Stillman 

Eleanor Stewart 

Lawrence Colvin 

Gertrude Gilpin 

Henrietta B. Paist 

Photo by "Walter Stillman 



Harriette B. Burt 



Page 

I 

2 
3 
4 
4 
5 
6 

7-n 
n 
u 

12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
J7 
18-19 
18 
20 
20 
21 
22 
22 
24 
24 



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Vol. XV. No. I. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



May I9I3 




HE fourteenth anniversary of the 
birth of Keraviic Studio dawns 
auspiciously. In every way success 
seems to be opening out before us 
and it seems almost as if we might 
say that we are meeting with a 
deserved recompense for we have 
conscientiously labored to bring 
before the ceramic fraternity or 
sisterhood, the best obtainable 
designs and the most helpful instructions. Moreover we can 
assure our friends that our interest has never waned and that 
we are momentarily on the outlook for every new movement 
and every possible helpful design or instructive article. We shall 
use every effort to make our future work gi'eatly outshine our 
past and every anniversary mark another milestone in the 
advance to a refined and truly American type of ceramic decora- 
tion. 

And do you not think we are offering you this month a 
pretty interesting issue? Besides the designs which we have 
endeavored to make as varied as possible, we find the illustra- 
tions of the new Keramic Society of Greater New York ex- 
ceedingly worth while. The members seem to be seriously 
endeavoring to evolve a new and characteristic style of work 
and succeeding wonderfully well at it. We wish them all 
sorts of good luck. We are hoping that the members of the 
old New York Society of Keramic Arts which has merged with 
the National Society of Craftsmen, will send us as interesting 
material from their exhibition which will be held this month 
at the Galleries of the National Arts Club. 

>h 
Our fourteenth anniversary supplement is, perhaps, the 
best Keramic Studio has ever published and the most useful. 
The dainty cup and saucer designs by Mrs. Kathryn Cherry, 
cannot only be used just as they are for after dinner coffees, 
but are easily adaptable to all sorts of pieces. Moreover 
Keramic Studio expects to give half tones of these cups in the 
full tea size in succeeding issues so that our readers will have 
the enlarged drawings for larger pieces. The coloring of the 
study, while very attractive, is, of course, not quite true, as a 
reproduction is never quite exact, but the color directions will 
enable the student to reproduce the originals in every detail. 

Elsewhere will be found the advertisement of our "Four 
Winds Pottery Summer School," but we would just like to 
say a word here about it for we feel that our dream of a really 
American school of ceramic design and decoration is beginning 
to come true, and not only that, but the opening wedge of an- 
other dream, of an Arts and Crafts village on top of "Robineau 
Hill." Not only have we Mrs. Cheny again for ceramics but 
there is such an enrollment of students that she will need at 
least one assistant and perhaps two. Then besides three 
teachers of other crafts we have had the signal good fortune to 
secure for our landscape sketching, Mr. Henry R.Poore, A. N. A. 
author of "Pictorial Composition and The Critical Judgment 
of Pictm-es," the "Conception of Art," etc. Mr. Poore was for 
seven years director of the Art Department at Chautauqua 



and later has been in charge of the composition classes of the 
Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts and has had much experi- 
ence in private classes. It is an exceptional opportunity for 
students of out-door work for Mr. Poore will devote his entire 
time to his classes giving five criticisms a week beside a weekly 
review of the class work in the studio. On Satm^days the 
student's will take their lunches and make a day of it in the 
open. 

The crafts classes will include jewelry and metal work, 
leather work and basketry, frame making, carving and gilding. 

The feature of children's classes in basketry, carpentry, 
sewing and drawing will be continued, not only because of their 
popularity here but because many mothers have found it 
solves the problem of what to do with their little ones while 
they are themselves studying. 

If the school continues to increase in numbers another 
year as it promises we shall have to build a sleeping place and 
restaurant on the grounds. 

We have been trimming our orchard trees and bringing 
in the branches to blossom out in water. It is a charming way 
to anticipate the spring. Have you tried it? If not, try it 
another year. A friend had a charming group of pussy willows 
and catkins in her window and another year we shall try other 
shrubs that blossom before the leaves come, such as Forsythia 
and Magnolia. 

-J- 

And now what are we going to do about the domestic 
problem, those of us who have homes and children and husbands 
and still feel called to follow the lure of art? For four long 
weeks the editor has been struggling with the mysteries of 
breakfast, lunch, dinner, sewing on buttons and darning, 
sweeping and dusting and otherwise trying to cling to some 
shreds of decency and order in her household while a two 
hundred and fifty dollar order stands, needing only a few hours 
to finish and suspended ideas in porcelain are fading in the dim 
distance and others are crying to be put in execution. This is 
a periodical discipline that never fails as a chastener and the 
periods are coming with momentarily lessening intervals. If 
only some good whole-souled woman with a love for art but 
talents only in the way of caring for a household and children 
would have the inspiration to take the home in charge and 
make it possible for the artist to devote her entire energies to 
doing something worth while in her art, heaven would have 
come upon earth, and, between you and me, the honor of the 
artistic achievement would belong to her almost as much as 
to the artist herself. It is because of the children and the home 
that we cannot and will not give up, that the woman can never 
hope to become as great in any line as man. Ai-t is a jealous 
mistress and allows no consideration whatever to interfere with 
her supremacy. 

Such dreams can never be realized; but in the meantime 
where are gone all those good 'old fashioned 'cooks*and ^helpers 
who gi^ew^tollove the family and became indispensable and 
faithful friends of a life time? — "Gone alas! like a dream, too 
soon! " 



nERAMIC STUDIO 



PEONY (Page 17) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 
T>ALE Salmon Rose outside petals. Center white shaded 
-t with Yellow and Pale Green in very deep center. Flowers 
are painted in very delicately with Blood Red and Lemon 
Yellow. The center is lightly shaded with Lemon Yellow and 
a very little Grey for Flesh, the very deep place in center is 
Apple Green. The leaves are Apple Green and Yellow shaded 
with Brown Green and Shading Green. The background is 
Copenhagen Blue, Violet and Blood Red. 

Second Firing — Use a thin wash of Rose on the lighter of 
flowers, shading the shadow side with Rose and a httle Apple 
Green. The centers are left almost a clear white, shading a 



little to the centers with Apple Green and Lemon Yellow. 
Leaves are washed with Apple Green. 

SINGLE WHITE CHRYSANTHEMUM (Page 3) 

Treatment by Kathryn E. Cherry 

SKETCH the design in, then paint the backgi^ound in with 
Painting Yellow, Mauve, Apple Green and Copenhagen 
Blue. The flowers are washed on the shadow side with Mauve 
a little Painting Yellow, the centers are Yellow Brown, Brown 
Green, Auburn Brown, a little Rose on the tips. 

Second Fire — Wash a thin wash of Painting Yellow on 
the shadow side of the flowers. The leaves are Brown Green 
and Shading Green. 



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CUP AND SAUCER 

Jetta Ehlers 

BANDS, Lavender Blue; roses. Pale Rose; leaves, Olive 
Green. 
For plate — Use seven roses in border and basket in center. 
For pitcher — Roses below band as on cup, only basket 
lower. 

For platter — Same as plate using ten roses in border and 
one on each side of basket in center. 




RERAMIC STUDIO 




SINGLE WHITE CHRYSANTHEMUMS PINK TIPPED 
PHOTOGRAPH BY WALTER S. STILLMAN 



(Treatment page 2) 



nERAMIC STUDIO 



CUPS AND SAUCERS (Supplement) 

K. E. Cherry 
No. I — Rose Motive 

'THRACE the design carefully with India ink, then oil the 
J- green leaves and dust with Water Lily Green, the roses 
are oiled and dusted with Cameo; then clean out the design 
carefully and paint the gold leaves. 

Second Fire— Paint the background with Deep Ivory 
then touch up the roses with Old Rose. Go over the gold again. 

No. 2 — Forget-me-not Motive 

Trace the design with India ink, dust the dark blue places 
with Blue for Dusting, then the green places with Water Lily 
Green, then fire. 

Second Fire— Oil and dust the light places with Water 
Green, touch up any of the dark blue places where it is neces- 
sary with Banding Blue and a little Copenhagen Blue, then 
paint in the centers with Albert Yellow and a little Yellow Red. 

Third Fire — Oil the entire cup, pad it very dry, allow it to 
stand for two hours then dust it with three parts of Ivory 
Glaze and one part Yellow for Dusting. 



No. 3— Rose Motive 

Trace the design in and ink it, then oil the green places 
and dust with Water Lily Green, then oil the rose form and 
dust with two parts Rose and one part Cameo, then oil the 
bands and dust with Mode. 

Second Fire — Touch up the places where the colors are 
uneven then fire. 

Third Fire — Oil the entire cup and dust with Cameo. 

No. 4— Panel Cup 

Ink in the design, then dust the panels with Deep Ivory, 
then dust the flower form with Yellow for Dusting, then oil 
the green leaves; dust with Florentine Green. The little red 
spots are painted with Yellow Red. Then paint in the gold. 

Second Fire— Paint in the dusted places with the dusted 
colors where colors are not even; then go over the gold again. 

No. 5— Derby Cup, "Haviland" 

Trace the design most carefully then oil all of the greenish 
blue places and dust with Water Green No. 2, then oil the violet 




CUP AND SAUCER— ALBERT HECKMAN 





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CUP AND SAUCER DESIGNS — K.E.CHERRY 



MAY 1913 

SUPPLEMENT TO 



COPYRIGHT 1913 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



places and dust with Mode. Clean the dusting well, then put 
in the gold, use Green Gold. 

Second Fire — Touch up all the uneven places then go over 
the gold again. 

No. 6 — Green Cup and Saucer 

Trace the design in, then oil the dark green places and dust 
with Water Lily Green, then oil the darker brown places and 



dust with Coffee Brown. The bands are dusted with Bright 
Green, the oil must be padded very thin for the Bright Green, 
so it will not be too bright, then oil the flower and dust with 
Yellow for Dusting. 

Second Fire — Touch up all the uneven places and fire. 

Third Fire — Oil the entire cup and dust with Green for 
Glaze. This must be padded very dry so it will be a very 
delicate cream. 





AFTER having placed the important lines of the 
design on the piece of china to be painted, with 
India Ink, tint the lighter parts of the design a delicate 
cream color and the darker parts of the background a 
light green, using a thin wash of Apple Green and a 
little Deep Blue Green. Let the paints dry well or 
bake in a hot oven and then paint in the flower forms 
and stems in two parts Banding Blue and one part Deep 
Blue Green. For all the other parts of the design use 
Water Lily Green or Grey Green. 




DINNER SET— ALBERT W. HECKMAN 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




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nERAMIC STUDIO 



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Leah H. Rodman 
Ella S. Miller Jessie L. Ivory 



Jessie L. Ivory 
Mrs. A. O. Kaplan 



Leah H. Rodman 
Martha F. Hilditch 



Anna M. Nulling 




Dorothea Warren-O'Hara 



EXHIBITION OF THE KERAMIC SOCIETY OF GREATER 
NEW YORK 

Dorothea Warren 0' Hara 

THE first annual Exhibition of ttie Keramic Society of 
Greater New York, was successful beyond all expectations. 
Although there was almost a continual down-pour of rain 
the entire week, yet crowds of enthusiastic admirers thronged 
the Exhibition room — the Sun-Parlor of the Waldorf-Astoria. 

The Society introduced a very agreeable innovation in 
exhibiting Table China only, which, with the exception of 
about twenty dark enamel bowls, was placed upon white 
linen. The dark bowls were displayed upon two large pol- 
ished tables at each side of the fire-place. 

The whole arrangement of the Exhibition was extremely 
pleasing; everything being displayed to the very best advan- 
tage. 

The dark days interfered considerably in taking the 




Georgia P. Unger. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




Mrs. L. Vance Phillips Mrs. W. H. Ross Mrs. Esther Coster Eva L. Pelton 

Mrs. Griffith Mrs. L. Vance Phillips 





Dorothea Warren-O'Hara 







Mrs. E. E. Smith 

KERAMIC SOCIETY OF GREATER NEW YORK 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




Wilhelmina Lenggenhagen 





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Mrs. George Dracgert 




Anna E. Fitch 

KERAMIC SOCIETY OF GREATER NEW YORK 



10 



nilRAMIC STUDIO 



photographs, consequently some of the best groups were not 
usable, but we have enough illustrations to show very satis- 
factory designs. 

The thing that most impressed the visitor was the won- 
derful color harmony and workmanlike execution, which in 
many instances made really poor designs attractive. 

We hope next year to have a larger variety of different 
kinds of work. This Exhibition consisted almost entirely 





Georgia P. Unger 

of Enamel work. The large soft glaze bowls were done in 
enamel in rather high relief, while the plates, cups, saucers, 
etc., were nearly all done in flat enamel, or enamel in very 
low relief. While there was a strong feeling that more of the 
work might have been carried out in something beside enamel, 
yet on the whole, the Exhibition revealed a great diversity 
of expression, and much real talent was brought to light. 

A very interesting part of the Exhibition, I might say, 



Georgia P. Unger 

almost the chief feature of the display, was the beautiful Bel- 
leek dinner set that the Lenox Incorporated of Trenton, N. J. 
presented to the Society. This set was decorated by nine 
members, and was sold for the benefit of the Society. 

The success of the Exhibition, both from the standpoint 
of attendance as well as sales, proves conclusively that there 
is a large demand for the over-glaze work done by our Ameri- 
can women. 




Cracker Jar and Candlestick — Mrs. Georgia Unger Plate and Bowl — Mrs. George Draegert 

KERAMIC SOCIETY OF GREATER NEW YORK 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



n 




a thin wash of Turquoise Blue over the Ughts of the blue 
flowers; strengthen the dark places with same colors used in 
the first fire; put the dark touches in the leaves with Shading 
Green and Brown Green. 



Leah H. Rodman 
KERAMIC SOCIETY OF GREATER NEW YORK 

MORNING GLORY— (Page 13) 

Treatment by Kathryn E. Cherry 

SKETCH design, then paint the darker flowers around the 
light flower, use Banding Blue with a little Violet; for 
the dark marking use more of the Violet than the Banding Blue. 
The centers are a thin wash of Yellow for Painting and a little 
Apple Green as you shade up to the Blue. The darkest part 
of flower is painted with Banding Blue and Ruby. The light 
flower is painted with Turquoise Blue used very thin and a 
little Mauve toward the center; the dark markings are Blood 
Red and a little Mauve; center is Painting Yellow. Paint the 
leaves with Apple Green, Yellow Green for the lighter ones; 
Yellow Green and Brown Green for the darker touches; in 
the very dark touches use Shading Green; the stems are Apple 
Green and a little Mauve. Paint the background with Paint- 
ing Yellow, Copenhagen Blue, a little Mauve and a little Tur- 
quoise Blue. 

Second Fire — Use the same colors as the first firing. Wash 




EGG CUP— A. LINGLEY 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

THE body of the chickens, bands and all of the flower form 
except the small spot at the top are Copenhagen Blue 
two parts, one part Banding Blue, three parts Grey for Flesh. 
The comb, eye and light space in wing of the chicken, also the 
small spot in the flower are Blood Red and Yellow Red. Feet 
and bill of the chicken are Albert Yellow and a little Yellow 
Brown; the end of the tail is outlined with the Red. 




FRUIT BOWL— LEAH H. RODMAN 



Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 



Paint the large fruit with Blood Red and a little Yellow Red. Leaves are Moss Green and a little Brown Green. Remainder 
of design Auburn or Hair Brown and a little Blood Red. Background is a thin wash 
of Yeflow Brown and a little Blood Red. 



12 



nERAMlC STUDIO 



BOWL, MUSHROOM MOTIF (Page 20) 

Henrietta Barclay Paist 
^INT entire bowl, inside and out, with Satsuma color and 
-» fire. Trace the design. Lay the bands with Grey 
Green with a touch of Olive Green to warm it. Tint the 
band back of the mushrooms with Grey Green. Clean out 
the design leaving the stems the Satsuma color. The tops 



of the mushrooms are laid with any soft dull brown, not too 
dark. The Satsuma with a touch of Brown and Black will do. 
The underside is a delicate seashell pink, use Capucine 
Red very thin. The outline and markings are of a dull Brown 
or Grey Green, not too strong. The lines outlining the bands 
are Black. Try to keep the colors delicate, matching the 
values as suggested by the black and white illustrations. 




CHICKEN PLATE— OPHELIA FOLEY 



Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 



OIL all of the design and dust with one part Banding Blue, 
one part Pearl Grey, two parts Aztec Blue . Paint the 
comb of the chicken, the large space of flowers in the center 
design and the small square space of the flowers in the border 



with Yellow Brown, a very little Blood Red and Violet. Feet 
of the chicken with Yellow and a little Yellow Brown. The 
wide white space in border, the leaves in the center design and 
the ends of the tail with Apple Green and a little Shading Green. 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



13 




MORNING GLORY— L. M. SNELL 



(Treatment page U) 



14 



nilRAMIC STUDIO 



DECORATIVE LANDSCAPE— (Page 15) 

Treatment btj Jessie M. Bard 

/^IL the trees and the dark part of foregi'ound with Special 
^^ Oil and dust with three parts Pearl Grey, two parts 
Grey for Flesh and a little Yellow. The lightest color in the 
sky is the very thinnest wash of Pearl Grey and a little Yellow, 
just enough to take away the cold tone of the china. The 



light grey tone is painted with a thin wash of Yellow Brown 
and Blood Red making a delicate pinkish tone. The darker 
grey in sky and distant landscape is Yellow Brown; light tone 
in distant landscape is Lemon Yellow. 

The lightest flowers are Pearl Grey and a little Yellow, 
the next tone is a very thin wash of Blood Red; some of the 
darker ones are Albert Yellow and others are Yellow Red and 
a very little Violet. 




HONEY JAR— SARAH RYEL COMER Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

All the fine lines and the bands are gold. The small heavy spots are Yellow Brown and a little Yellow Red. 



ki:kamic studio 



15 







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1 1 




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DECORATIVE LANDSCAPE— A. W. DONALDSON 



(Treatment page 14) 



16 



KEKAMIC STUDIO 




PLATE, CONVENTIONALIZED FIG-EULA L. McELHINNY 



Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

PUT the leaves in with gold and all outline. Make the 
outline a little heavier than in the design. Second Fire 
— Paint the figs with Yellow Brown, shaded a little with Blood 



Red. Paint bands with two parts Banding Blue, one part 
Copenhagen Blue. 

Background in design is Deep Blue Green and a touch of 
Violet painted on quite light. 



HERAMIC STUDIO 



17 




PEONY— PHOTOGRAPH BY WALTER S. STILLMAN (Treatment page 2) 



18 



ItERAMIC STUDIO 




DINNER SET— CUP AND SAUCER 

Eleanor Stewart 

OUTLINE design in black and dry thoroughly in 
oven. Paint leaves green, using Apple Green 
with touch of Deep Purple and Brunswick Black to 
tone. Paint flowers with gold. The design could also 
be carried out in enamels in one fire. 








BOWL— LAWRENCE COLVIN 



Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 



OIL the large petals of the flowers and the two narrow bands 
at the top and dust with three parts Ivory Glaze, two 
parts Albert Yellow, one part Yellow Brown. Oil the remainder 
of the design and dust with three parts Pearl Grey, two parts 



Apple Green, one part Shading Green, one-half part Grey for 
Flesh. Second Fire — Oil over the entire surface on the outside 
of the bowl and over the border on the inside and dust with 
two parts Pearl Grey, one part Palma Rosa Salmon. 



HlEkamic studio 



19 



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DINNER SET, PLATE— ELEANOR STEWART 



(Treatment page 18) 



20 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



HELPFUL HINTS 

A piece of asbestos board cut to fit the bottom of the kiln 
makes stilts unnecessary for pieces that do not rest flatly on 
the bottom. This need never be removed but should be 
brushed or wiped before each packing. Plates or any flat 
pieces can be safely fired on edge on this, by being careful to 
separate them at the top by small stilts. Often a small narrow 
strip cut from asbestos paper answers better than a stilt, but 
this should not touch a painted surface or it will not glaze well. 

My kiln has a running length of more than twelve feet 
of stove-pipe, wired to hold. As a means of precaution I 
used occasionally to hire a man to take it down and clean it, 
but have found that the preparations sold at the stores for 
cleaning soot out of chimneys will work as well in the kiln. 

Put plenty of the powder on the burner, turn on enough 
oil to keep it burning well, and in an hour or two the walls will 
be white and clean. 

To help a kiln wear well, close all the drafts as soon as the 
firing is over, shut any door or window that allows cold air to 
blow on the kiln while it is cooling, and never be tempted to 
open or unpack it until it is cool. 

It often happens that pupils want to work all day and 
bring their lunch for the noon hour, have good short stories, 
magazine articles, or some helpful reading at hand, and have 
one read while the others are eating. During the afternoon's 
work the reading can be discussed, and personalities, the bane 
of a studio, avoided. Good books, not too long, have been 
read this way taking a chapter or two at a time. 



If pupils work until they are fagged out insist on 
them leaving their work for a short walk or rest. A couch is 
a good piece of furniture for a studio. 

Some one comes in in a hurry, wants to make a gift right 
away, but the design must be new or different. Refer them to 
your list of birthday flowers, or find the recipients' favorite 
flower or color, their nationality, or section of country they 
live in. Nearly every locality has some thing or symbol 
typical of itself, and for those who have or care for them the 
family coat of arms is good. One of my pupils made a little 
original design that she now works in on all her own pieces 
giving them a personal touch. A belt pin in a Florida scene, 
trees festooned with Spanish Moss delighted the heart of a 
girl moving to the far northwest; Irish Moss in green, on an 
Irish bride's plates; Heather and Thistles for the Scotch; a 
design in Arrow-head and Oranges for a San Bernardina, 
California, girl; one thing suggests another until it becomes 
difficult to choose. 

A note-book made from my own observations and exper- 
iences is given each new pupil to copy and study to the benefit 
of both pupil and teacher. 

Don't be fearful of giving too much for the pay you get; 
it is good to have your pupils come back to see you occasionally 
and tell you how much they appreciate you since they have 
gone out in the world where you pay for everything you get. 
One good turn deserves another, and generally speaking, 
gets it, and there is need of good fellowship in our worlc. 

Gertrude Gilpin. 





BOWL, MUSHROOM MOTIF— HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST 

Adapted from the Japanese 



(Treatment page 12) 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



21 



^ 




GOLDEN HARVEST PEONY— PHOTOGRAPH BY WALTER S. STILLMAN 



Treatment by Kathryn E. Cherry 

FLOWERS are a very delicate pink, deep yellow in the 
centers with five touches of crimson. Paint the flowers 
with Painting Yellow used very thin, deeper in the center, 
touched on the tips with Rose. Leaves are Yellow Green, 
Brown Green, Shading Green. Stems are Brown Green and 



Yellow Brown. Background, Yellow Brown, Brown Green, 
Mauve, Yellow Green. Second Fire — Shade the shadow side 
of the flowers with Apple Gi'een and Rose, darken the yel- 
low in centers with Yellow Brown and Brown Green. Wash 
a thin wash of Apple Green over the leaves, strengthen the 
shadows with Yellow Green and Brown Green. 



22 



RERAMIC STUDIO 





Design for silk by a stttdent, Miss Knofflock's Class in Design. 



Bookbinding Class, tinder Miss Baker. 




Work of Book Binding Class, under Miss Baker. 




Work from Design Class, under Mrs. C. P. Davis and from Wood Carving 
Class, under Mr. Dawson Watson. 






Sheet in Plant Analyses — Done in Class under Miss Knofflock. 

A PAGE OF CRAFTS FROM THE ST. LOUIS 
SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS 




Design for Wall Paper— Class in Design, under Miss Knofflock. 



REKAMIC STUDIO 



23 



STUDIO NOTES on both hard and soft wares, and that better work is being taken 

Mrs. Ada Borre Newquist, Des Moines, la., has removed ^P "^°^^ generally in enamel, lustre and dry dusting treatments 

her studio to the third floor of Wilkins' Dept. Store, 8th and ^^ P^P'^^ ^^ studios both east and west. 

Walnut Sts., and has also added a china department for the During Mrs. O'Hara's summer class last year, it was 

sale of both decorated and white china. generally understood that she would have a class this summer 

The F. G. Coover exhibit of conventional outline work and she is receiving quite a number of inquiries. Her plans 

was shown in a number of eastern studios the past month. Mr. have been changed and she now intends to spend this summer 

Coover reports there is a remarkable interest in enamel work in Europe in the further advancement of her work. 




BUDDLEYA— PHOTOGRAPH BY WALTER S. STILLMAN 



THE flowers are washed in lightly with Deep Blue Green 
and Sea Green shaded with Deep Blue Green and a 
little Violet; the centers are Yellow Brown and Yellow Red; 
the foliage is Shading Green and Yellow Green. 



Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

Second Firing — Wash a thin wash of Deep Blue Green 

over the flowers with touches of Banding Blue and Violet; the 

buds are Banding Blue and a little Ruby. For a background 

use Copenhagen Blue and Apple Green; a little Grey for Flesh. 



24 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




PINE CONES— HARRIETTE B. BURT 



Treatment by Kathryn E. Cherry 

THIS is a good motif for etching. For painting, paint the 
pine cones with Yellow Brown, Auburn Brown and 
Brown Green; the needles are Yellow Green and Brown Green; 
the stems are Brown Green and Black. 

SUMMER SCHOOL NOTE 

Mrf3. W. P. Garrett announces that she will have her summer school as 
usual in Thousand Island Park. This is, so far, the only announcement of 
summer school we have had. 

^ of 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

Mrs. C. D. — Stippling is done with a brush called a stippler, it is a round 
brush with very short hair suid the color is padded on with this instead of 
being painted with long strokes as is usually the case. A reflected light is 
one that is cast on an object after striking on some other substance, it is not 
a direct light such as the high Ught is. 

D. L. O. — Mix the cement for mending china with luke warm water, 
it is best to use a bone knife and be sure that everything is clean. Mix to 
the consistencj' of thick cream. Apply the cement to both of the broken 
edges and hold them together until the cement hardens; when very dry, scrape 
off all the extra cement and give it a light fire, place it in the kiln so it cannot 
slip as the cement softens in the process of heating. Sometimes it is advisable 
to bind it together with asbestos cord but this is apt to take the color off 
where it touches. 

K. R. — ^Paint a thin wash of Yellow over the Green to produce the yeUow 
tone. Use Pearl Grey and a little Yellow Brown for a cream backgroimd. 
If the spots are not too large you might cover the inside of the bowl with 
Light Green Lustre and use an all-over design on the outside. There is no 
way of restoring the glaze to china. It is best to use a design over the places 
where the color will be dry dusted on as it will glaze easier than a painted color. 



^\j \ ^v the birth-month 
1tA^6^l a of ceramic studio 

SUBSCRIBE NOW~Begin with the first number of the new vol., (the 15th) . 
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Back Numbers at a Premium 

For sale at $1.00 each, postpaid, Keramic Studio for July, 
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Others who have out of print back numbers for sale at 
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Mrs. C. V, Hoffman, Bound Brook, N. J. 

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Gertrude C. Meyer, 600 E. 59th St., North, Portland, Ore. 



"Arto" Banding Wheels are better 



than ever. Hundreds are 
in daily use all making 
banding easy. 

When you want good 
White China and Art Ma- 
terial you'll want our goods. 



EVERYTHING FOR ARTISTS AND CHINA PAINTERS g^MARSHALL^ 

A. H. ABBOTT & COMPANY 1^&^^ 

127 North Wabash Avenue, Chicago 

SELLING AGENTSJFOB REVELATION KILNS OUTSIDE COOK CO.. ILL. 





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^re the Finest and Best InKs and j'VdHesives. 
Emancipate yourself from the use of corrosive and ill-smelling inks and adhesivcs, 
and adopt tlie Higgins Inks and adhcsives. Tliey will be a revelation to you, 
they arc so sweet, clean, well put up, and withal so efficient. 
At Dealers Generally 

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branches: chtcago, London. 




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and Dec, 1910, Jan., Feb. March, 1911. 

Quote price, postpaid, to this Company 
KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO,. SYRACUSE. N. Y. 



Willets^ Belleek China 

Highest grade china made for china painters 

Over seven hundred artistic shapes, glaze suitable 

for colors. Can be had of dealers. 

Send for Catalogue of shapes to manufacturers, 

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Trenton, New Jersey 



Border Patterns Surface Patterns 
Applied Designs 

Just Published— A SET OF TEN CARDS, 

giving some entirely new motifs, and some fresh 

applications of familiar motifs, useful in your daUy work. 

Yon should see these, and see them at once. 
Send us Fifty Cents and ask for 

Set No. 5 School Arts Drawing Cards 

SCHOOL ARTS PUBLISHING CO., 

Dept. M. BOSTON, U. S. A. 




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Select Powder Colors for China 

The best Quality. Finely Ground. BRUSHES and MEDIUM For Sale by Leading 

Art Stores. WATER COLOR STUDIES TO RENT. Mail Orders Promptly Filled 

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The Keramic Studio Supplements 

for the next three months are as foflows: 

JUNE — Salmon Berry - - Jeanne M. Stewart 



Conventional Bird Design 

for Plate - - Alice Sharrard 

Stein - - - - Florence Weisfcopf 



JULY- 
AUGUST- — Groap of Scotch Thistles Jeatme M. Stewart 



Remember that $1.00 will secure these three ntjmbers. If 
yotir sabscription has ran oat, renew at once. 

The groap of Caps and Saucers by Mrs. Cherry which forms 
the supplement of this number (May) will also be used as 
the frontispiece of our new book on Cups and Saucers 
which will be ready May 1st. A price of $1.50 has been 
placed on this book which will be attractive to all lovers of 
good designs. 

We are booking orders NOW for May 1st Delivery 

Keramic Studio Pub. Co., 

Syracuse, N. Y. 





11 


CONTRIBUTORS 


ft 


) JESSIE M. BARD 


/ CLARA L. CONNOR 


^ 


M. W. CAUDLE 


mm 


PAULA FENSKA 


S5 


RUSSELL GOODWIN 


HJIIi 


' ORILLA E, MINER 


\^^R 


HANNAH B. OVERBECK 


^^H 


HENRIETTA B. PAIST 


H^n 


JEANNE M, STEWART 


v^HJ 


WALTER STILLMAN 


kv^l 


. ALICE SEYMOUR 


v^9 


k LUCY M. SHOVER 


^^ 


i OLGA SORENSEN 


^^ 


^. WM. G. WHITFORD 



A 



nflGflZINEf OR THE POTTER AMDDECORATOR- 



The entire contents of this Magazine are covered by the genera! copyright, and the articles must not be reprinted without special permission 

CONTENTS OF JUNE, J913 



Editorial Notes 

Pitcher 

Scarlet and Crimson Oriental Poppies 

Cream Pitcher 

Round Box 

Fish Platter 

"Work of Orifla E. Miner and Class, Pullman, Washington 

Snap Dragon 

Salmon Berry (Supplement) 

Sandwich Tray 

Conventional Jack-in-the-PuIpit 

Jack-in-the-PuIpit 

Bleeding Heart Vase 

Study of Bleeding Heart 

Bleeding Heart, Platter 

Bleeding Heart Bowl and Milk Pitcher 

Bleeding Heart Salt or Pepper Shaker 

Bleeding Heart Two Plates 

Bleeding Heart Cup and Saucer and Biscuit Jar 

Virginia Creeper 

Bouillion Cup and Saucer, Acorn 

Chop Plate in Green and Silver 

Hoflyhocks 

Helpful Hints 

Answers to Correspondents 



Henrietta B. Paist 
Photo by Walter Stillman 
M. W. Caudle 
Alice Seymour 
Russell Goodwin 

Photo by Walter StiUman 
Jeanne M. Stewart 
Paula Fenska 
Lucy M. Shover 
Lucy M. Shover 
Hannah B. Overbeck 
Hannah B. Overbeck 
Hannah B» Overbeck 
Hannah B. Overbeck 
Hannah B. Overbeck 
Hannah B. Overbeck 
Hannah B. Overbeck 
Wm, G. Whitford 
Clara L. Connor 
Olga Sorensen 
Walter S. Stillman 
Orilla E. Miner 



Page 

25 
26 
27 
28 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
37 
38 
39 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44-45 
43 
43 



Jg"" ■ ■ "■ ■Ill" " " " ii ni'iiiiii i Twiim ■ ■■■■ ■■■ ■ ■■ ■■ III ■ 11 1 ^ 

THE OLD RELIABLE i^im FITCH KILNS 




Th« thousands of these Kilns in use testify to 
their Good Qualities 



THE ORIGINAL PORTABLE KILN 



INEXPENSIVE TO BUY 
COST LITTLE TO OPERATE 




^ 



The only fuels which give perfect results in ' 
Glaze and Color Tone 

No. 2 SbeJ4xI2in $30.00) ^., , . / Na I Site ID x t2 to. Si5,0C 

No. 3 Sbe 16 X ,9 la......„ 40.00 j G« Klin 2 ,..« ^^^ ^^ ^ ^,^^^ ) ^^ ^ SI,. 16 x 12 In. 20.00 

WRITE FOR DISCOUNTS, ( S: ^^ % I ^ tZZ ^Z 

STEARNS, FITCH & CO., SPRINGFIELD, OHIO 



Vol. XV. No. 2. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



June 1913 




ITH the summer vacation approach- 
ing, we are reminded of the troubles 
of some of our good friends who 
want to use this season for study and 
for various reasons are prevented. 
There is one who writes that not 
only are her means limited but that 
every summer, because of the beauty 
of the country where she lives all her 
good friends from all points of the 
compass descend upon her in swarms and she is compelled to 
use all her time from early morn to dewy eve in catering to the 
inner man by way of the kitchen stove. To discuss the last 
question first — If we were that too easily imposed upon lady, 
we would write a circular letter and have it typed and sent 
to all expectant and expected guests, saying that she finds that 
she can not afford to lose the opportunity for study that the 
summer affords, so, though she would dearly love to have them 
visit her, she can only invite them on the condition that they 
pitch in and do their share of the work. That seems to us the 
only fair thing to do all around, for it is not fair to others to let 
them grow accustomed to imposing on their friends. About 
that flat pocket-book — If, instead of painting naturalistic 
studies, she would decorate a lot of little things that would 
make pleasing souvenirs of her beautiful home, perhaps the 
friends might help inflate that empty bag by purchasing to a 
point where it could be utilized for further study. Or she 
could get up a summer class in china decorating and invite 
the friends to join at so much per. We know one awfully nice 
little girl who came last year to our summer school and did 
a lot of charming conventional and semi-conventional things 
with the teacher and went home and sold them and taught 
what she had learned until she had made enough to more 
than pay her expenses here another year. And this was her 
first attempt. It seems almost always that where there is 
sufficient will there will always be a way. 

This year in my spring garden I have some flowers that 
I have not had before and so I have not thought to suggest 
them to our readers as subjects for study and design. First of 
all there is a colony of Miterwort. Long ago in one of the 
earlier issues of Keramic Studio I published some of my 
own studies and designs from this dainty flower, but had not 
thought of it as available to garden lovers. Last year I went 
out with baskets and trowels to a ravine nearby and brought 
home a lot of wild flowers and ferns for the stone-walled garden 
about the gold fish pool; it was an experiment but a successful 
one for this year they grew bright and early and had increased 
a hundred fold; there I found them all, white and yellow and 
blue Violets, Ferns, Miterwort, Solomon's Seal, Squirrel Corn 
and Dutchmen's Breeches, Hepaticas, and many flowers of which 
I have not yet learned the name. They are mingled with the Yel- 
low Primrose and Crimson and Orange Polyanthus and Wall 
Flower and Japanese Iris leaves, with the Boston Ivy on the 
stone walls for a background. They delight our eyes and 
gladden our hearts. Tiy some of these flowers for study this 
year. The Primrose has wonderful possibilities in a decorative 



way as well as the different varieties of Dicentra, the Squirrel 
Corn, Dutchman's Breeches and their more conspicuous 
garden cousin, the Bleeding Heart, of which Miss Overbeck 
gives us so many studies this month. Out in the hedge we have 
a different set of wild flowers, Trilliums, Blood Root, False 
Solomon's Seal, Wild Geranium, etc., etc. 
•I- 
This season let us go to the woods for inspiration and next 
faU we will have a competition in conventionalizations of the 
various wild flowers. Suppose you all see what you can do in 
this line. Make your careful drawing of flower, leaf and stem, 
then make conventionalized units of flower and leaf, a page of 
these, then a page of semi-conventionalized designs, i. e., 
small flower panels connected with conventional or geometrical 
design or small semi-conventional flower arrangements for 
borders. Then a page of conventional designs applied to 
straight and curved edges, all from, the same flower. Do this 
with every flower of which you make a study. Send these to 
Keramic Studio about the fifteenth of September and we will 
have a wild woods Christmas issue with prizes for the best 
work. We will have a prize for the largest number of flowers 
studied and prizes for the best studies of flowers. You work 
on this idea and we will announce the competition later. 

SUMMER SCHOOL AND STUDIO NOTES 

The Studio of Mrs. Mary Alley Neal, 1425 Broadway, 
New York, N. Y., will be open during the entire summer. 

The Ai-t Institute of Chicago will, as usual, have a Summer 
School beginning June 30th and lasting twelve weeks. The 
Ceramic Class is under the management of Mrs. Abbie P. 
Walker, design class every day, painting lessons for china on 
Tuesdays and Thursdays. 

Miss Leah H. Rodman, 47 AV. 36th St., New York, N. Y., 
will continue her classes in Brooklyn and New York during 
the summer months. 

Miss May Reynolds of Chicago, has been engaged for a 
few weeks by the Railsback China Co., of Los Angeles, Cal., 
where she is teaching at present. 

Miss Reynolds spent two weeks at Winfield, Kan., at 
the studio of Mrs. Ida T. Lockwood, before going to the far 
west. 

^ ^- 

SHOP NOTES 

B. F. Drakenfeld & Co., importers and manufacturers of 
mineral colors and materials have moved from 27 Park Place 
to their new building at 50 Murray St., which the growth of 
their business made necessary. 

Mrs. F. N. Waterfield and Miss C. Kroll have purchased 
the Domestic Art Rooms, 149 Washington St., Newark, N. J., 
where they will continue the business formerly conducted by 
D. H. Morris. 

CLUB NOTES 

The ceramic artists of St. Paul and Minneapolis have 
combined in forming a new society under the title of the Twin 
City Ceramic Club. Winifred D. Sandy is secretary. 



26 



KlEramic studio 








PITCHER— HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST 

Flat Enamel and gold lines. Grapes, violet; leaves, green 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



27 




SCARLET AND CRIMSON ORIENTAL POPPIES— PHOTOGRAPH BY WALTER S. STILLMAN 

(Treatment page 30) 



28 



HERAMIC STUDIO 




CREAM PITCHER M. W. CAUDLE 



Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 



All dark parts of design are Green Gold. The three large flowers are oiled and dusted with two parts Apple Green, one part 

Yellow Green. All small flowers are painted with Yellow Lustre. 





ROUND BOX— ALICE SEYMOUR 



(Treatment page 32) 



ri:ramic studio 



29 



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30 



KLERAMIC STUDIO 







WORK OF ORILLA E. MINER AND CLASS, PULLMAN, WASH. 



SCARLET AND CRIMSON ORIENTAL POPPIES (Page 27) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

FIRST firing use Yellow Red and Carnation for the red in 
poppies. The stamens are purplish black, use Roman 
Purple and Black. The gi^een centers are Yellow Green with 
markings of Brown Green and Black. The leaves are painted 
in with Shading Green and Apple Green. The stems are 
Brown Green very light with touches of Violet. 

Second Firing — Shade flowers with Pompadour and Blood 
Red and a touch of Roman Purple toward centers in the very 
deep places. Use same colors as used in first firing for leaves. 
For a background use Yellow Brown, Blood Red and a little 
Violet. 



SNAP DRAGON (Page 31) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

I7IRST Firing — For the white blossoms use Lemon Yellow 
a little Apple Green and Grey for Flesh for the shading. 
The salmon pink blossoms are Pompadour used very thin and 
just a little Yellow Brown, shading these with a little Blood 
Red. The crimson flowers are Blood Red and Yellow Red; for 
the foliage use Shading Green and a little Yellow Brown with 
touches of Yellow Green. The stems have a little Brown 
Green and Violet. 

Second Firing — Use same colors used in first firing and 
strengthen the foliage with same as first firing, the background 
is Lemon Yellow and Grey for Flesh and a little Violet. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



31 







SNAP DRAGON-PHOTOGRAPH BY WALTER S. STILLMAN (Treatment page 30) 



32 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



SALMON BERRY (Supplement) 

Jeanne M. Stewart 

PALETTE: Lemon Yellow, Egg Yellow, Yellow Red, 
Yellow Brown, Pompeian Red, Ruby Purple, Brown 
Green, Shading Green, Yellow Green, Turquoise Green, Wood 
Brown, Grey and Ivory Yellow. 

This berry which grows extensively throughout the north- 
west is in appearance and growth much like the red raspberry, 
though larger and in the golden colorings with an occasional 
brilliant red berry. 

The yellows should be applied rather lightly in the first 
fire, shading with a mixture of Yellow Red and Egg Yellow 
and Yellow Red and Yellow Brown as a lighter or darker tone 
is desired. Deeper shadows are applied in second painting 
with a tone of Egg Yellow, Yellow Red and Brown Green. 

For the brighter red berries use Egg Yellow in highest 
lights, shading with Yellow Red, and Pompeian Red with one- 
third Ruby Purple added for darker tones. 

The leaves may have a few of the Yellow and Brown touches 
for variety, although painted mostly in the brighter greens. 
A soft warm grey for background is made with Stewart's Grey 
and Pompeian Red, with Brown Green and Pompeian Red 
added to give depth to shadow under the dominant mass in 
the design. 



JACK-IN-THE-PULPIT (Page 34) 

Lucy M. Shover 

THE leaves are Yellow Green and a little Shading Green; 
the blossom is Painting Yellow and a little Yellow Brown ; 
the very dark in this blossom is a greenish yellow, use the 
Painting Yellow and Yellow Brown and Brown Green. The 
stems are Brown Green and Yellow Brown, the dark shadow 
on the stems is Yellow Green and Brown Green. 

CONVENTIONAL JACK-IN-THE-PULPIT (Page 34) 

FOR the color combination use Yellow for dusting for the 
light tones and the Deep Ivory for the deep tones. 
Outline with Black when using it on larger pieces. 

TREATMENT FOR ROUND BOX (Page 28) 

Alice Seymour 

CENTER of top and panels on base Cream Yellow. Back- 
ground of bands thin wash of Yellow Brown 4, Ivory 
Glaze 1 and a touch of Hair Brown, panels Yellow Brown 
Lustre, two coats, dark form and band Gold and outline with 
Hair Brown. 




FULL SIZE SECTION OF CHOP PLATE— PAULA FENSKA 




-i 




SALMON BERRY— J EAN N E M. STEWART 



JUNE 1913 

SUPPLEMENT TO 

KERAMIC STUDIO 



KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



33 



HOLLYHOCKS (Pages 44-45) 

Treaiment by Jessie M. Bard 

THE delicate blossoms are painted in with Lemon Yellow, 
a little Apple Green with a clear Yellow center; the 
medi m tone flowers are painted in with a delicate wash of 
Pompadour Red with a thin wash of Violet toward center; 
the center is Albert Yellow, the dark flowers are Blood Red 



and just a little Ruby added to it; the center is Albert Yellow 
and a little Yellow Brown; the buds are Moss Green and 
Brown Green,; the stems are Moss Green and Lemon Yellow. 
The colors used in second fire are the same as first fire 
using thin washes on light side and strengthening the centers. 
The background is Lemon Yellow, Brown Green and Yellow 
Brown. 







SANDWICH TRAY— PAULA FENSKA 



Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 



OIL all grey parts except the flowers and the wide band 
and dust with two parts Ivory Glaze, one part Pearl 
Grey, one part Apple Green and a touch of Yellow. Oil the 
light part of flowers and the wide band and dust with^three 
parts Ivory Glaze and two parts Yellow Brown. Paint the 



grey tone in the flowers with Auburn or Hair Brown and a 
httle Blood Red. 

Second Fire — ^Oil over the entire surface and pad until it 
tacks. jDust with one-half part Grey Yellow, one part Y'el- 
low Brown, five parts Ivory Glaze. 



34 



nERAMIC STUDIO 



y@/©is>^'?'?©fi)<? 



T'n&m 



vl as'fe" 1-^ "T^yg-fysLf ^T 




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IfU^f I.^'ko 



^ey._ 



CONVENTIONAL JACK-IN-THE-PULPIT— LUCY M. SHOVER (Treatment page 32) 



tlERAMIC STUDIO 



35 




JACK-IN-THE-PULPIT— LUCY M. SHOVER 



(Treatment page 32) 



36 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




BLEEDING HEART, VASE— HANNAH B. OVERBECK 

Hannah B. Overbeck 

TINT entire vase with Black Green and fire. There need 
be no outlines or where they are not along backgi'ound 
of band they may be in Black Green. Paint light parts of 
flowers and stems in Yellow Green with a little Black and 
other parts of flowers Ruby; tint upper and lower parts of 
vase with Black Green 1-2, Grey for Flesh 1-2, and fire. In 
third firing dust background of band with Black Green and 
strengthen flower parts. 



BLEEDING HEART STUDY (Page 37) 

Hannah B. Overbeck 
■pAINT darker parts of flowers with Rose and outline all 
A other flower parts in with Rose so that all have the same 
tone of rose. Paint lighter flower parts lightly with Rose 
with a touch of Yellow Green along the central line of these 
light parts. Outline leaves and stems with Olive Green with 
a little black and paint upper parts of leaves with same and 
paint lower parts of leaves and stems with Grey Green with 
a little black. On background apply a tint of Grey Green 
1-3 Grey for Flesh 2-3. 

BLEEDING HEART, PLATTER (Page 37) 

Hannah B. Overbeck 

THERE may be black or very narrow gold outlines. Paint 
small dark spots Empire Green and those parts in sec- 
ond darkest tone Rose; on all other parts and band on edge 
use Grey Green with a little black and tint backgi'ound of 
band with Dark Green No. 7. 

BLEEDING HEART, BOWL (Page 38) 

Hannah B. Overbeck 

OUTLINE with Hair Brown. Paint dark parts of side 
Hunter's Green and other parts and bands Yellow 
Ochre 2-3, Hair Brown 1-3; tint background of band with 
Hair Brown and leave lower part of bowl white. 



BLEEDING HEART, MILK PITCHER (Page 38) 

Hannah B. Overbeck 

OUTLINE all with Blood Red and paint dark parts of 
flowers with same. Paint all other parts of flowers in 
Yellow Ochre and rest of design and band about top with 
Brown Green with a little Black. There should be a light 
tint of Brown Green 1-2, Finishing Brown 1-2 on lower back- 
ground spaces and a heavier tint of Yellow Ochre 1-3, Fini5h- 
ing Brown 2-3 on backgi'ound on upper part of pitcher. 
^ ^• 
BLEEDING HEART, CUP AND SAUCER (Page 40) 

Hannah B. Overbeck 

Outline with Black, paint darker parts of design with Copen- 
hagen Blue. Paint other parts of design and bands with 
Mussen Brown with a little Grey for Flesh and background 
with Copenhagen Blue. 

BLEEDING HEART, BISCUIT JAR (Page 40) 

Hannah B. Overbeck 

LEAVE narrow spaces for gold outlines. On the darker 
parts of the design use Ruby and on the lighter parts 
Imperial Ivory with a little Grey for Flesh. On the background 
of the band use a heavy tint of Grey for Flesh and all other 
parts may be tinted with Grey for Flesh 1-2, Imperial Ivory 1-2. 
^ IM- 
PISH PLATTER (Page 29) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

TRACE in the design and oil all the dark parts except on 
the fish and dust with Water Blue— do not oil it very 
heavily. A httle Ivory Glaze may be added to the color to 
prevent it from getting too dark. The dark spaces on tha 
fish are Green Gold. A band of the gold may be added near 
the edge of the tray. 



HER AMI C STUDIO 



37 




BLEEDING HEART— HANNAH B. OVERBECK 



(Treatment page 36) 




BLEEDING HEART, PLATTER— HANNAH B. OVERBECK (Treatment page 36) 



38 



tlllRAMIC STUDIO 




BLEEDING HEART, BOWL-HANNAH B. OVERBECK (Treatment page 36) 




BLEEDING HEART, MILK PITCHER— HANNAH B. OVERBECK (Treatment page 36) 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



39 





BLEEDING HEART, SALT OR PEPPER SHAKER— HANNAH B. OVERBECK 

Tint all but top part with Finishing Brown and fire. Then outline all parts with Finishing Brown and tint background 
on bands and about figures with Grey for Flesh ; paint darker parts of designs with Peacock Blue and lighter 

parts with Peacock Blue | Grey for Flesh. 




BLEEDING HEART, TWO PLATES-HANNAH B. OVERBECK 

Outline with Black, on dark parts of designs use Turkish Blue i, Sea Gull Grey |; on other parts of designs and vands 
use Black Green and a little Black and on the background apply a tint of Black Green ^, Sea Gull Grey |. 



40 



nERAMIC STUDIO 




BLEEDING HEART, CUP AND SAUCER—HANNAH B. OVERBECK (Treatment page 36) 




BLEEDING HEART, BISCUIT JAR— HANNAH B. OVERBECK (Treatment page 36) 



KEKAMIC STUDIO 



41 



IToody ^^r\ff<fi^i^v\l^ 




PecuUacitr <5f pl2n:\r~±_ 



"^^[l^SE^ fREEPEm 






VIRGINIA CREEPER— WM. G. WHITFORD 



Treatment by Kathryn E. Cherry 



The leaves are Yellow Green, Brown Green and a little Shading Green; the berries are Turquoise Blue, a very little Shading 
Green and touches of Black. The blossoms are white with a bit of Yellow in the center, use the Painting Yellow. 



42 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




FULL SIZE SECTION OF CHOP PLATE -OLGA SORENSEN 




BOUILLION CUP AND SAUCER, ACORN 
CLARA L. CONNOR 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

PAINT the darkest spaces with a delicate lav- 
ender made of Violet No. 2 and a little 
Deep Blue Gi'een. The cap of the acorn is Moss 
Green and a very little Violet. The grey band, 
handles and feet are equal parts of Pearl Grey and 
Grey for Flesh. These colors should all be kept 
in the same tone. 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



43 



HELPFUL HINTS 

When oiling a vase to gi^ound-lay a color I do not clean 
out all of the design, but leave a small space where I can 
touch my finger to test the dryness of the oil. Just before 
powdering I rub off this space. In this way I avoid any light 
spots in the background. 

I never put any gold on a piece of china until the tinting 
has been put on. It is very difficult to clean tinting from a 
space which has gold on it and also hard to burnish such gold. 

I do my outhning for the first fire because the pen works 
so much better on white china than on fired tinting. 

Orilln Miripr. 



ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

Underglaze worlc does not apply t.o china decoration but to the pottery. 
The decoration is placed on the biscuit and the glaze put over it. The cause of 
enamels chipping is usually the fault in mixing, you may have used too much oil 
in them — it would depend on the way they were mixed whether they should 
be fired hard or not, you will have to fire them hard enough to glaze them. 
Take a knife and remove as much of the enamel as possible before firing again 
to be sure that no more chips off. The Satsimia ware is a -Japanese crackle 
pottery and is a cream color. 

MRs. J. E. H. — -iNIonograms with a gold band are still used but a simple 
conventional design mth just a sparkle of bright color is more interesting. 
The monogram is placed in the border to break the band. 

E. L. S. — Yes the china can be fired after it has been painted for some 
time. The cause of coral enamel firing orange instead of coral is because of too 
M" 1 111 3, the color fires out. 







CHOP PLATE IN GREEN AND SILVER— OLGA SORENSEN 

TRACE design. Tint centre panels with one part Cela- sign with Bm-nished Silver, leave small open spaces white, 
don and one part Pearl Grey. Panels on rim a darkei- Second Fire: Strengthen color in rim panels and again 

shade of the same color. Dust with Pearl Gi-ey. Paint de- dust with Pearl Grey. Apply silver. 



44 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




HOLLYHOCK— PHOTOGRAPH BY WALTER S. STILLMAN (Treatment page 33) 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



45 




HOLLYHOCK— PHOTOGRAPH BY WALTER S. STILLMAN (Treatment page 33) 



46 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



FOUR WINDS POTTERY 

SUMMER SCHOOL 

Robineau Road, Syracuse, N. Y., June 30 to Au^. 9, 1913 





PORCELAIN AND POTTERY DECORATION 



KATHRYN E. CHERRY BASKETRY 



BERTHA RI3LET 




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"We illastratc here some of the work of the teachers of the school. For partictiJars about terms, 
boarding places, etc., apply to S. Robineati, care of Keramic Sttidio Ptiblishing Co., Syracuse, N. Y. 



When writing to advertisers please mention this magazine. 



IMPROVED OUTLINING INK 

USED WITH PEN ON CHINA DRY BY HEATING 

COLORS AND GOLD 

MAY BE USED ALSO, BEFORE FffiING 

Per Bottle 35 cts., post paid 

Myers-CIapp Correspondence School 

511 McCarthy Block, S. Salina and Onondaga Sts., Syracuse, N. Y. 

The best white china and art material 

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Lists sent on request. 

The "Arto" Self Centering 
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so easy, they are increasingly 
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You'U like our goods whether 
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~FbR ARTISTS AND CHINA PAINTERS 

A. H. ABBOTT & COMPANY 

127 North Wabash Avenue, Chicago 

SELLING AGENTS FOBr;REVKLATION:KILNSiODTSIDK;COOK CO.. ILt 





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CLASSROOM PRACTICE IN DESIGN 

By JAMES PARTON HANEY 

Director of Drawing, High Schools, GreaierSNcwJYvrk 




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ONE OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS 

A concise, richly illustrated brochure on the teaching of applied design. 

An exposition of the principles that should underlie instruction in design 

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Price, postpaid, 50 cents 



Wash Method of Handling Water Colour 

By FRANK FOREST FREDERICK 

Director of School of Industrial Art, Trenton, N. J. 

"This little book is a helpful guide and affords a stimulus to the use o 

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Border Patterns Surface Patterns 
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Just Published— A SET OF TEN CARDS, 

giying some entirely new motifs, and some fresh 
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You should see these, and see them at once. 

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The Keramic Studio Supplements 



Jeanne H. Stewart 

Alice Sharrard 

Florence Weiskopf 

Jeanne M. Stewart 

Harriette B. Bart 

If yotxr 



for the next three months are as follows; 
JUNE— Salmon Berry - 

Conventional Bird Design 
JULY— for Plate - 

Stein - - - - 
AUGUST— Group of Scotch Thistles 
SEPTEMBER— Phisalis 
Remember that $1.00 will secure three numbers. 

subscription has run out^ renew at once. 
The group of Cups and Saucers by Mrs. Cherry used as sup- 
plement in the May number also forms the frontispiece of our 
new Book of Cups and Saucers published on May 8th. A 
price of $1.50 has been placed on this book which will be at- 
tractive to all lovers of good designs. Postage Paid. 

We are booking orders NOW for prompt delivery 

Keramic Studio Pub. Co., 

Syracuse, N. Y. 



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The entire contents of this Magarfne are covered by the genera! copyright, and the articles must not be reprmted without special permission 

CONTENTS OF JULY, 1913 



Editorial Notes 

Wistaria 

Flower Borders 

Stein, Bird of Paradise Motif (Supplement) 

Plate, Peacock Motif (Supplement) 

Cactus Dahlias 

Plate Border 

Plate 

Cups and Saucers 

Tile, in Blue and White 

Bird Design for Satsuma Bowl 

Tulip Tree Blossoms 

Tulip Tree , 

Arbutus 

Conventional Suggestions for Arbutus Flower 

Plate, Arbutus Motif 

Crimson Collarette Dahlia 

Salad Set, Cucumber Motif 

Sand Buttercups 

Tobacco Jar 

Tulip Tree 

Technical Study of the Decoration of Art Ceramics 

Pompon Dahlia, Deep Rose Pink 

Scarlet and Orange Decorative Dahlias 

Owl Plate 

Answers to Correspondents 



Mary H. Fewsmith 

Ruth M. Ruck 

Mrs. Florence Weissfcopf 

Alice B. Sharrard 

Photo by Walter Stillman 

Mrs. Robt. D. Haire 

Pearl Monro 

K. E. Cherry 

Lawrence Colvin 

Florence Weisskopf 

Alice B. Sharrard 

Alice B. Sharrard 

A. W. Heckman 

A. W. Heckman 

A. W. Heckman 

Photo by Walter Stillman 

Henrietta B. Paist 

Hallie Day 

A. W. Donaldson 

Louis Franchet 

Photo by Walter Stillman 

Photo by Walter Stiflman 

Ophelia Foley 



Page 

47 
48 
48 
47 
48 
49 
50 
50 
51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 
58 
59 
60-61 
62 
62 
63 
64-66-68 
65 
67 
69 
69 



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STEARNS, FITCH & CO., SPRINGFIELD, OHIO 



Vol. XV. No. 3. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



July I9I3 




S I sit by the log fire this chilly June 
night scratching and poking around 
in the attic of my brain for an idea 
with which to fill the editorial page, 
it occurs to me that cold and damp 
Junes are not favorable to ceramic 
inspirations — for ceramics are natur- 
ally associated in one's mind with 
hot and exciting moments and the 
only chill is one of nervous tension. 
Of course there is the log fire — but it blazes and flickers, dies 
down and starts again in a most inconsequential way while 
the movement of ceramic heat is one of steady increase up to 
the crucial moment. And even while I cudgel my brains, 
the wood turns to ashes and the chill of the surrounding at- 
mosphere creeps in. Have all my ideas gone out with the fire? 
I believe they have — ^fourteen years of tending the sacred 
flame of the ceramic fire, have consumed them. 

Requiescat in pace — and how can one hope to discover 
a really valuable idea in a brain crammed and jammed with 
such ideas as how to warm up the roast for the fourth time 
in a real disguise; whether to let down Priscilla's gown or 
take it up for Elizabeth; what to plant for succession in the 
bed of Canterbury Bells; how to get the windows washed or 
the floors scrubbed with no help in sight; how to squeeze 
out a moment of mental quietude in which to pursue one's 
ceramic aspirations; whether to try to make up the dummy 
for the next issue of the magazine or go to bed to rest the weary- 
ing turmoil in an individual not cut out for the household 
struggle but forced to keep her nose to the gi-indstone. Lo! 
these weary months of domesticless domesticity. It is only 
left to join the weary world cry of: Help! Help wanted! 



I have on my study table a new book, "Art and Industry 
in Education" — a book illustrative of the principles and 
problems of the Fine and Industrial Arts at Teacher's College, 
published by the Arts and Crafts Club of Teacher's College, 
Columbia University. 

This is a collection of essays on various subjects of inter- 
est to students of arts and crafts by the students of Columbia 
Teacher's College, illustrated interestingly and instructively 
and should be a worth while book to add to one's study li- 
brary. A list of the subjects touched upon will be of interest. 

The Gospel of Ai't — "Work thou for pleasure; paint or 
sing or carve the thing thou lovest though the body starve. 
Who works for gloiy misses oft the goal; who works for money 
coins his very soul; work for the work's sake then, and it may 
be that these things may be added unto thee." — Kenyon Cox. 

Industrial Arts Education at the Dresden Congi'ess. Art 
Principles in \witing and lettering. Blue and Sepia Printing 
as an aid in art Teaching. The International Exhibit of 
modern art. Symbolism in Teaching Art. The field of 
Modern Photogi-aphy. Pottery Plates, a problem in Fine and 
Industrial arts. Manual Training — What's in a name? Wood 
Block Printing. The Decorative use of the Figure in Adver- 
tising Cement and Concrete. Paper Cutting. Design and 
Construction. Use of Museums in school work. Costume 
design in 7th and 8th grades. Good Furniture. The High 



School Annual as a Problem in Art. Experimental work in in- 
dustrial arts as a means of efficiency. Decorations in a Res- 
taurant. Development of Personality in house decoration. 

Apropos of the introduction of Manual and Art Training 
into the gi'aded schools, it would seem that all mothers, 
whether following the call of art or craft or the great occupa- 
tion of home making and rearing of children, or even the new 
woman suffragette, would welcome the movement as a light- 
ening up of their labor and responsibilities. "Satan finds 
some mischief still for idle hands to do" is as true to-day as 
it ever has been and if the children can be led to take an in- 
terest in some line of manual work you can be quite sure that 
while so occupied not only their hands will be out of mischief 
but their busy little brains will be too occupied to make room 
for naughty or mischievous thoughts. So it behooves us all 
to help the good work along. 

It was for this reason mainly that our summer school 
conceived the idea of children's classes in Basketry, Sewing, 
Carpentry, Carving, etc. It has proved a very popular and 
helpful feature. Many mothers who could not otherwise 
leave home, have brought the children along with a lightened 
heart and it is really remarkable to see their interest and the 
work accomplished. It is the solving of much of the worry 
of a mother's life — something for the little hands to do and 
the little mind to enjoy, at the same time training hands and 
minds into useful tools for the future. 

STEIN— F. R. WEISSKOPF (Supplement) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

THE outline is Black and a little Violet. The deep yellow 
tone is gold. Oil the purple tones forming the bands 
and dust with one part Royal Purple, one part Aztec Blue, 
two parts Ivory Glaze, after which the gold and outline may 
be applied and fired. 

Second Fire — Oil the gi^ey tones in the panels and dust 
with three parts Pearl Grey, one part Palma Rosa Salmon. 
Leaves, head and wings of bird are painted with Violet No. 2 and 
a little Rose. Bright red in tail and on head is Ruby and a 
little Blood Red. Pink in lower part of panel is Rose and a 
little Violet No. 2. Background in flower border is Pearl 
Grey and a little Yellow, back of leaves is Grey for Flesh and 
a very little Ruby. The yellow backgi'ound space is Lemon 
Yellow and a very little Yellow Brown. 

DECORATIVE PLATE (Page 50) 

Pearl Monro 

OUTLINE in Black. Light part of wings a thin wash 
of Yellow Brown shaded into Blood Red. Wide outer 
band Blood Red. Dark part of circles in center of plate and 
the drapery around the face Albert Yellow and a very little 
Brown Green. Space back of circles Carnation. Background 
back of head a soft pink using a very thin wash of Blood Red. 
A very little Yellow Brown and Yellow Red washed over 
shadows in the face and neck. All other parts of design 
Moss Green and a little Shading Gi'een. Large backgi-ound 
cu-cle left white, 



48 



RERAMIC STUDIO 





No. 5. Flowers have just enough rose washed over them 
to take away the white glaze, shadows are a thin wash of Apple 
Green and a little Brown Green. The back of the turned over 
blossom is a stronger pink, also the edges of the upper one. 
Petals of the bud are pink. Leaves are Apple Green and 
Yellow shaded with a little Brown Green and Shading Green. 
Stems are Rose and a little Auburn Brown. 

No. 6. Blossoms are White. Outhne and shadows are 
Yellow and a httle Brown Green. Center is Yellow shaded 
with Yellow Brown and a little Auburn. Leaves and stems 
are Apple Green shaded with Shading Green and just a little 
Brown Green. Buds are same with a little Yellow added. 
A very thin wash of Yellow may be painted over the flower 
in second fire to destroy the glaze of the china. 

PLATE, PEACOCK MOTIF, Supplement 

ALICE B. SHARRARD 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 
' I ^HE yellow tones may be gold or Yellow, Yellow Brown 
A and a little Brown Green. Pink tone is Palma-Rosa, 
Salmon or any soft pink. Violet tone in tail Violet No. 2 and 
a very little Pink. Flowers are Banding Blue and a little 
Violet. Leaves are Grey for Flesh and Shading Green. Back- 
ground is Pearl Grey and a little Yellow. 



WISTARIA— MARY H. FEWSMITH 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

OUTLINE with Grey for Flesh and a little Black. Paint 
light part of flowers with a thin wash of violet and for 
the darker tone add Banding Blue and a little Deep Blue 
Green. Leaves are Moss Green with a little Brown Green, add 
a little Yellow for the lightest tone. The heavy stem at the 
top is Auburn Brown and Grey for Flesh, the lower stem is 
the same as the light tone in the leaves. Backgi'ound is a 
thin wash of Violet and Yellow. 

FLOWER BORDERS— RUTH RUCK 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

THE blossoms in the first two borders are a delicate pink, 
the shadows are a stronger pink. Use a very thin wash 
of rose for the (1) dehcate tone and heavier for the dark. 
The stamen are Albert Yellow shaded with Yellow Brown. 
Leaves Moss Green and Apple Green shaded with Brown 
Green and a little Violet. Stems are Brown Green and a little 
Moss Green. 

No. 3 is the same except that the stamen are red and 
are painted with Blood red and a little Yellow Red. 

No. 4 ffowers are painted with a thin wash of Albert 
Yellow and shaded with Yellow Brown. Use a very little 
Brown Green for the deepest touches. The stamen are Yellow 
Brown and a little Auburn Brown. Stems Apple Green 
and a little Yellow shaded with Brown Green. Buds are 
same with more yellow added. 




FLOWER BORDERS— RUTH M. RUCK 






^ 



a 




F^ 



PLATE^PEACOCK MOTIF— ALICE b.sharrard 
STEIN — BIRD OF PARADISE M OTI F-FLO R E N C E WE I S KO P F 



JULY 1913 

SUPPLEM ENT TO 

KERAMIC STUDIO 



KERAM(C STUDIO PUB. CO. 

SYRACUSE , N. Y. 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



49 




CACTUS DAHLIAS— PHOTOGRAPH BY WALTER S. STILLMAN (Treatment page 53) 



50 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




PLATE BORDER— MRS ROBERT D. HAIRE 



(Treatment page 52) 




DECORATIVE PLATE— PEARL MONRO 



(Treatment page 47) 



nERAMlC STUDIO 



51 




No. 2 



52 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




FULL SIZE SECTION OF BIRD PLATE— ALICE B. SHARRARD 



PLATE BORDER (Page 50) 

Mrs. Robert D Haire. 

OUTLINE in Black. The two bands and the circles be- 
tween the sections are gold. For the leaves use Apple 
Green toned with Deep Purple and a very little Black and 
add 1-8 relief white. The four smaller flowers nearest to the 
center painted with equal parts of Capueine and Pompadour 
without the enamel. Yellow Red may be used instead of 
Capueine with a little Dark Brown added to it. The two 
smaller flowers on the end of the spray and the dark tone in 
the largest flower are Orange toned with Yellow Brown and 
Yellow Red; add 1-8 Relief White. The light part of large 
flower is Silver or Albert Yellow toned with just a touch of 
Deep Purple and 1-8 Relief White. 



TULIP TREE (Page 55) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

PAINT the tulips with a very delicate shade of Yellow 
for the lights and shade with Yellow and a little Brown 
Green and use a little Yellow Brown for the warmer tones. 
The dark marking of the flower is Yellow Brown, shaded with 
a little Yellow Red and outlined with Yellow Red and a little 
Dark Brown. The stamens are Yellow Brown and a little 
Yellow outlined with Brown Green and a little Yellow and 
outline of the flower is the same. Light part of leaves is 
Apple Green and a little Violet No. 2, dark tone is Moss Green 
with a little Brown Green, Shading Green. The outline is 
Shading Green, Grey for Flesh. Stems are Auburn Brown 
and a little Violet. Background is Pearl Grey and Yellow. 




TILE, IN BLUE AND WHITE— LAWRENCE COL YIN 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



53 



CACTUS DAHLIAS (Page 49) 

Treatrnent by Kathryn E. Cherry 

THE lighter ones are painted in with Albert Yellow, Yel- 
low Red, Blood Red toward centers. The centers are 
Blood Red and a little Ruby. The darker flowers are Pompa- 
dour and Ruby shaded with a little Black in the Ruby. The 



Shading Green. Background, Yellow Brown, Blood Red, 
Mauve, Grey for Flesh. 

Second Fire — Wash the yellow flowers with a thin wash of 
Painting Yellow on the light side, on the shadow side Yellow 
Brown and a little Brown Green. A little Rose is painted on 
the tips of the flowers. The dark flowers are painted with 
Ruby and Blood Red, the Pompadour is washed over the 



leaves are Brown Green, Shading Green and Black with the centers and Black with Ruby in the very deep touches. 




BIRD DESIGN FOR SATSUMA BOWL— MRS. F. R. WEISSKOPF 

Same treatment as for Stein (Supplement) on page 47. 



54 



HERAMIC STUDIO 










TULIP TREE BLOSSOMS— ALICE B. SHARRARD 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



55 




TULIP TREE— ALICE B. SHARRARD 



(Treatment page 52) 



56 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



POMPON DAHLIA (Page 65) 

Treatment by Kathryn E. Cherry 
Tj^OR the flowers use Blood Red very thin, a Uttle Ruby 
•T with the Blood Red toward the centers. The leaves 
are Yellow Green, Brown Green, Shading Green. The stems 
are Blood Red and Mauve. For the background use Painting 
Yellow, Mauve, Brown Green, and Copenhagen Blue. 

Second Fire — Use same colors as used in the first fire, 
strengthen the dark side of the flowers with Ruby and Rose; 
wash Rose on the light side. The leaves are touched up with 
Shading Green and Brown Green. 



CONVENTIONAL SUGGESTIONS FOR ARBUTUS 
FLOWER (Page 57) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 
'T^HESE borders may be used on plates, cups and saucers, 
-■- bowls. The color scheme may be taken from any other 
treatment in the magazine and applied to these as they will 
easily adapt themselves to any treatment either in gold or 
color or a combination of both. 




ARBUTUS— A. W. HECKMAN 



nERAMlC STUDIO 



57 



















CONVENTIONAL SUGGESTIONS FOR ARBUTUS FLOWER— A. W. HECKMAN (Treatment page 56) 



58 



heramic studio 



CRIMSON COLLARETTE DAHLIA (Page 59) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 
"PIRST Firing— Paint the edge of flowers with Blood Red 
^ and Ruby Purple; the white in flowers has a wash of 
Yellow and a touch of Apple Green; the center is Albert Yel- 
low and Yellow Brown. Leaves are Brown Green and Shad- 
ing Green; the stems are Yellow Green and Albert Yellow 



shaded with Shading Green; the buds are Albert Yellow and 
Moss Green. 

Second Firing— Paint a thin wash of Blood Red over 
flowers, strengthen the centers with Albert Yellow, Yellow Red 
and touches of Brown Green. Background is Albert Yellow, 
Grey for Flesh and Brown Green. Strengthen leaves with 
same color used in first firing. 




PLATE, ARBUTUS FLOWER MOTIF— A. W. HECKMAN Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

/^IL all the darkest tones and dust with 2 parts Banding h. Grey for Flesh, ^ Banding Blue. Second fire— Oil over 

V^ Blue, 1 part Aztes, 1 Ivory glaze. Then oil the grey the entire surface and dust with 1 Pearl Grey, 1 Ivory Glaze 

tone in the border and dust with 3 Pearl Grey, 1 Ivory Glaze, and a little Deep Blue Green. 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



59 




CRIMSON COLLARETTE DAHLIA— PHOTOGRAPH BY WALTER S. STILLMAN 



(Treatment page 58) 



60 



heramic studio 



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RERAMIC STUDIO 



61 




SALAD SET, CUCUMBER MOTIF— H. B. PAIST 



AFTER placing and outlining the design in Black (water 
mixture), tint the entti'e bowl a warm Ivovj and fire. 
To give the outside of the bowl a deeper tint than the inside, 
tint and fire again before laying the colors of the design. The 
flowers are then laid with a medium strong wash of Albert Yel- 
low, or any Yellow that answers to this yellow in strength. 
(They are the color of Jonquils.) The ivory tone underneath 
and the black outline will both help to keep the color from be- 
coming too intense. Use Grey Green for the leaves and stems 
(if you haven't a good Grey Green soften and grey your color 
by adding Neutral Yellow and Black;) also the band and 
lines above and below the design and at the extreme base. 

This applies to the outside of the bowl. For the inside 
(using the band and circular unit) lay the colors thinner and 




CENTER OF SALAD SET PIECE 



the panels in the band may be either a light, soft tint of Grey 
Greenor a deeper tint of old ivory, Neutral Yellow. If the 
green is right in color and value it is perhaps preferable as it 
keeps the border from becoming spotty. As shown in the 
reproduction, the values in the central unit are too strong for 
use inside of the band. It will be all right if used as decoration 
on top of box, etc., but the contrasts are too strong for the 
inside of our bowl and should be lessened. 

If the colors are dusted on, one application will do; if washed 
on, we may have to go over them twice to flatten and get the 
exact strength we wish. If one prefers the gold bands instead 
of the green they should be outlined to help give emphasis to 
the design and to hold it together. 

For the plate the same color scheme and treatment may 
be followed. 

^ <^ 

CUPS AND SAUCERS (Page 51) 

K. E. Cherry 
No. I — Rose Motive 

TRACE the design carefully with India ink, then oil the 
green leaves and dust with Water Lily Green, the roses 
are oiled and dusted with Cameo; then clean out the design 
carefully and paint the gold leaves. 

Second Fire — Paint the background with Deep Ivory 
then touch up the roses with Old Rose. Go over the gold again. 

No. 2 — Forget-me-not Motive 

Trace the design with India ink, dust the dark blue places 
with Blue for Dusting, then the green places with Water Lily 
Green, then fire. 

Second Fire— Oil and dust the light places with Water 
Green, touch up any of the dark blue places where it is neces- 
sary with Banding Blue and a little Copenhagen Blue, then 
paint in the centers with Albert Yellow and a little Yellow Red. 

Third Fire — Oil the entire cup, pad it very dry, allow it to 
stand for two hours then dust it with three parts of Ivory 
Glaze and one part Yellow for Dusting. 



62 



heramic studio 




SAND BUTTERCUPS 



SAND BUTTERCUPS 

Treatment by Kathryn E. Cherry 

THESE flowers are good motives for conventional designs. 
Outline with Black, paint flowers with Albert Yellow, 
shade with a little Brown Green and Albert Yellow. Leaves 
are Yellow Green and Yellow Brown. Background Yellow 
Brown and Grey for Flesh. 

TOBACCO JAR— HALLIE DAY 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

OIL flowers and dust with two parts Yellow Brown, one part 
Albert Yellow, three parts Pearl Grey. Oil stems and 
bands and dust with same mixture as above to which has been 
added two parts Meissen Brown. Outline is black. Oil over 
entire surface for last fire and dust with five parts Pearl Grey, 
one-half part Yellow Brown. 

SCARLET AND ORANGE DAHLIAS (Page 67) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

THE orange flower is painted in with Albert Yellow, Brown 
Green and Yellow Brown, with touches of Yellow Red. 
The scarlet flower is painted with Yellow Red, Carnation; 
deepest tones in flowers are Blood Red and just a little Ruby; 
the leaves are Moss Green, Brown Green and Yellow Green. 
Second Firing — Paint a thin wash of Lemon Yellow on 
light side of flower and Albert Yellow on the deep side; the 
centers are painted with Yellow Brown and Yellow Red; the 
scarlet flowers are touched up with a thin wash of Carnation, 
shading with Blood Red and a little Roman Purple. The back- 
ground is Yellow Brown and Yellow Green, touches of Brown 
Green around flowers. 




nERAMIC STUDIO 



63 




TULIP TREE— A. W. DONALDSON 



Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 



OUTLINE and all the darkest tones are Black. Oil the 
leaves and dust with 1 Violet, 2 Yellow Green, 1 Pearl 
Grey. Paint the stamen with 2 parts Yellow Brown, 1 part 
Grey for Flesh, the stems with Grey for Flesh, a little Blood 
Red and a touch of Violet. The inside of the petals of the 



flower is Albert Yellow shaded with Yellow Brown and a little 
Moss Green, the outside is Apple Green, Violet and a little 
Grey for Flesh. The background is oiled and dusted with 
3 Ivory Glaze, 1 Pearl Grey and a little Apple Green. 



64 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




No. 1. Primitive Process. Santa Clara Pottery (Pueblo Indians, New Mexico)- 
Pottery blackened by smoke. In the National Museum, Washington, D. C. 



TECHNICAL STUDY ON THE DECORATION OF ART 
CERAMICS 

Louis Franchet 

AMONG the many decorative processes used in ceramics, 
some are exclusively mechanical industrial processes, 
others are special to art work and these will be the subject of 
our study. 

Artists have often called my attention to the fact that, if 
some of the decorative methods employed in the old times 
were better known, modern decorators would derive from them 
many useful indications. 

I will then examine some of the methods which have been 
in use from the most remote times and show that some processes 
which have made possible very remarkable works of art, are 
entirely neglected to-day, and are even absolutely unknown 
to artists. 

In order to show all the resoui-ces which the cei-amic 
technique offers them, I will group in the following classes all 
the decorative processes which have been in use since the time 
when men had no other tools than stones or the bones of 
animals. 

A — Primitive Processes 

Not all the methods used by primitive potters are of use 
in modern art, but nearly all, if better known and understood, 
would give important suggestions for the decoration of our 
ceramics. 



Among old processes, which were used before the discovery 
of glazing, I will mention the following: 

1st. Polishing— which the potter does with his wet hand; 
this requires very fine bodies. 

2d. Glossing — obtained by rubbing the piece, while it is 
still slightly damp, with a tool made of wood, horn or bone. 
For this also bodies must have a very fine grain. 

3d. Smoking — which colors the piece black. The piece 
is simply fired in an extremely reducing atmosphere, at a low 
temperature (600° to 700° C.) 

4th. Varnishing — which is obtained by covering the fired 
pottery with vegetable varnishes, generally colored. In the 
Congo, natives have produced by this method remarkably 
artistic works. Some of these varnishes are mat, other bright, 
and they are used either alone or combined, and often to bring 
out some incised ornament, effects also are varied by making 
the application either cold or warm. Because this decoration 
has been practiced by negroes, it should not be concluded that 
it presents no difficulties. On the contrary it is very difficult 
to carry out sucessfully, and, as it is very durable (more than 
some of our glazes which crease and shiver), it could very well 
be adapted to the decoration of modern art work, especially 
as modern chemistry ofll'ers us the most varied resources. 

5th. Incised decoration. 

6th. Excised decoration. 

7th. Inlaid decoration. 

These three processes have been used in primitive times, 
but I will describe them at length later on and will show how 
they can be adapted to modern work. 

8th. Relief decoration — This process is so well known 
that it is not necessary to say much about it. It can be ob- 
tained either by directly modeling ornaments in the paste, or 
by applying ornaments which have been previously modeled or 
made in moulds. 

A variety of this decoration, which might be called drop 
decoration, was used in very remote times. It consisted in 




PrimiUee Pi 
ochres. 



Kcss. Large Jar (Ancient Peruvian). Painting with 
In the Metropolitan Museuiu of Art, New York. 



liERAMIC STUDIO 



65 





POMPON DAHLIA, DEEP ROSE PINK— PHOTOGRAPH BY WALTER S. STILLMAN 



(Treatment page 56) 



66 



nilKAMIC STUDIO 




No. 3. Recent industrial 



We 



--- ,- - Wedgwood „__ 

wliite Jasper ware, about 1790. Decorations probably by Plaxman. 



and Pedestal in green and 

. - probably by Plaxman. Relief 

decoration by mould work. The flgiu-es and designs are made in 
moulds and applied to the body of the vase. The fine imdercutting and 
finishing work of the period of Josiah Wedgwood and Flaxman distinguishes 
the early pieces from the reproductions made in later periods. In the Met- 
ropolitan Museum of Art, New York. 

depositing on the piece drops of slip, so as to form a definite 
design. A few years ago a ceramist obtained very interesting 
effects by substituting drops of glaze for drops of slip. 

9th. Applied decoration — which is the application on the 
vase of ornaments in special materials. This process was used 
a few years ago, the ornaments being made of a kind of metallic 
mesh work. Although I have seen some very beautiful pieces 
thus made, I do not believe that the process is to be recom- 
mended, because such a decoration is always hard and dry. 

10th. Painted decoration — for which primitive people used 
colored clays, sometimes vitrifiable. I will again refer to this 
later on. 

11th. Slip envelope (in French "engobage") — a method 
which consists in covering the entire piece with a clayey ma- 
terial of some kind to hide the natural color of the body. All 
ceramists know this process. 

B — Recent Processes 

I call recent processes of decoration those which are not more 
than 3500 years old. This looks far distant, but it is not, if we 
consider that the first principles of ceramic decoration date from 
an extremely remote period. However, these processes which 
I call recent and which I date from the time of the discovery of 
alcaline glazes, were employed together with the primitive 
processes for a very long period. 

The processes are so well known that a simple enumer 
ation will be all that is necessary : 

12th. Enamel which is always opaque. — 

13th. Glaze — which is translucent.* 

14th. Salt glaze — this is a thin coat of silicate of soda 
which forms on the surface of the ware, when sea salt is va- 
porized in the kiln at a temperature of about 800° C. 



Colors over raw enamels. 
Vitrifiable colors. 
Under glaze colors. 
Colored slips. 
Metallic iridescent colors — obtained in a reducing 



15th. 

16th. 

17th. 

18th. 

19th. 
atmosphere. 

20th. Metallic lustres — obtained in an oxidising atmo- 
sphere. 

As to frits and fluxes, they are not properly decorative 
materials but only enter into the composition of the latter. 

Applications to Modern Art 

Several of the processes used in this comparatively recent 
decoration of ceramics, are to-day completely forgotten, 
especially some of those which were employed in the early 
times, when the alcaline glaze was first invented. They would 
however furnish good suggestions for decoration and I will 
treat this subject later on. 

I want in this article to speak specially of some of the 
primitive processes which could be very advantageously ap- 
lied to modern art. f 

We may leave out the processes of polishing, glossing, 



*Mr. Franchet gives three French names for these different coverings of 
the ware, email, which is opaque; glacure which is translucent and adheres to 
the surface of porous wares, and couverte which is the translucent glaze ii.sed 
on porcelain and gres and incorporated with a vitrified body. In practice 
these rather subtle distinctions are not strictly observed, and in this country 
there is a tendency to use the word glaze for the different glassy compositions 
with which a ware is covered, whether opaque or translucent, and to reserve 
the word enamel only for the thick, opaque vitrifiable colors used at low tem- 
perature in ceramics or in metal work. (Ed.) 

tAs we have not a great number of illustrations of primitive pottery, we 
will also give illustrations of some potterie.? or porcelams in which old pro- 
cesses have been used for or adapted to the decoration of modern or com- 
paratively recent ceramics. (Ed.) 




Primitive process. Greek Vase — Second half of VI Century B. C. Painted 
black decoration on red. In the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



67 



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68 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




No. G. Recent application of primitive process. Chinese porcelain vase witli blue 
glaze, K'ang Hsi period, 1662-1722. Incised decoration. In the Metro- 
politan Museum of Art, New York. 

varnishing, which are not susceptible of being used to a great 
extent at present. As to relief decoration, applied decoration 
and slip covering, they are still in use and do not need any 



special mention. We will then study specially only the incised, 
inlaid, excised and painted decorations oithe very remote times. 

Incised Decoration 

Incised decoration has been practiced during all primitive 
periods. We find everywhere numberless examples of it, and 
the most remarkable are found on Etruscan and on South 
American potteries. 

This decoration is particularly interesting on wares 
colored in black by strong smoking because the incised design 
appears in mat tones on a lustrous background. 

We will see what improvements can be brought to this 
method, meanwhile here is how one should proceed for in- 
cisions on a black body: 

Incisions on raw ware— After the shape has been made, 
the design is traced on it, then it is gone over for the final in- 
cision with a steel point, the best shape for which is the tetra- 
gonal shape with a very sharp point. The leg of a compass is 
a very good tool, as with it one can regulate at will the depth 
of the incision. 

One may use naturally or artificially colored bodies, but 
the old potters used often black bodies colored by smoking 
at low temperature (Etruscan potteries). In order to have 
well fired pieces, the American Indians burned the pieces in a 
normal oxidising fire up to 800° or 900° C. then they let the 
temperature drop to about 500° C, when they strongly smoked 
the ware for several hours. 

The black tone thus obtained by saturating the body 
with carbon has this great advantage over artificial coloration, 
that a simple rubbing, after the smoke firing, will give the piece 
a beautiful, characteristic lustre, while the hollow incised 
decoration remains mat. 

(TO BE CONTINUED 




No. 4. Modern process. Porcelain plaque byjTaxile Doat (Sevres). Relief decoration in pate 
sur pate. The. figures are entirely raised by handiwork, by successive applications of slip with 
the brush. This kind of reUef decoration may be of course reproduced by mould work (Wedg- 
wood process), and it is. difficult to distinguish the two, except from the fact that in pate sur 
pate work the decoration js not repeated. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



69 



STUDIO NOTES 

The Osgood Art School, 181 West 73d St., New York, 
N. Y., will be opened during the entire summer. 

M. T. Wynne will be located at 52 West 36th Street after 
July 1st. 

J- J. 
ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

E. A. T. — -No. 1. We do not know what powder Miss Gilpin refers 
to for cleaning pipes but it is probably powdered zinc and can be found in 
a drug store. This is used in the same manner that she mentions so is prob- 
ably the same. 



No. 2 — The china will fire all right after having been painted any length 
of time. 

No. 3 — The powdered flux should have no different effect on the color 
than the tube flux has. The trouble is probably from some other reason. 

No. 4 — -You can make green gold by mixing silver and gold and it can be 
applied over the roman gold. 

A. G. C. — ^We have never heard of the sunshine china. It is probably 
a name that some teacher has given a color combination. One teacher has 
an orange lustre lining under her saucers and placed them on a coffee tray 
which reflected the orange giving it a bright effect and she called it her sun- 
shine set. Perhaps this is what you refer too. 

C. D. — ^If your design is in gold it would be best to apply the lustre 
over the entire surface and then apply the design over the fired lustre. Some 
good effects may also be had by applying color over the fired lustre but the 
color remains on the surface, it does not sink into the glaze. If you apply 
the lustre and wipe out the design it would probably be best to fire it before 
applying the design, it would be hard to apply the design and not injure the 
lustre unless the design is very simple. 




OWL PLATE— OPHELIA FOLEY 



(Treatment by Jessie M, Bard) 



OIL all dark parts of design and dust with Mode to which 
has been added about 1-5 Ivory Glaze or it may be dusted 
with 1 Violet, 4 Pearl Grey, 1 Ivory Glaze. Oil the leaves 
and the space in the border just in front of the birds head 



and dust with 1 Grey Green, 1 Albert Yellow, 1 Yellow Green, 
3 Ivory Glaze. Paint the eyes and claws of oil with Albert 
Yellow and a very little Yellow Brown and the flowers with 
Yellow Brown and a little Yellow Red or Blood Red. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



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making the articles shown in the many illustrations. 

The booli is well illustrated with half-tones and line drawings, showing photo- 
graphs of many finished articles and full-page working drawings of twenty useful and 
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in leather brown Coruscan paper. 

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Back Numbers at a Premium 

For sale, Keramic Studio magazines from January, 191 0, 
to December, 191 2, Miss Anna E. Butterfield, Cedar Rapids, 
Iowa. 

Copies of Jtily, October, November and December, 19 10, 
and January, February and Marclji, 1911, at .75 each, post- 
paid, Mrs. C. V. Hoffman, Bound Brook, N. J. 

I have seven copies Keramic Studio (out of print numbers) 
as follows: July, Oct., Nov., Dec, 1910. Jan., Feb., March, 
I9n. Price, postpaid, $5.25, Mary Sunderland, 808 N. 5th 
St., Burlington, la. 

For sale, back numbers as follows: July, Oct., Nov., Dec, 
I9I0. Jan., Feb., March, 1911. First class condition, $3.00 
postpaid, Mrs. L. T. Gibson, 64 N. 9th St., Newark, N. J. 

The.Keramic Studio Supplements 

for the next two months are as follows: 

AUGUST — Group of Scotch Thistles Jeanne M. Stewart 
SEPTEMBER— Phisalis - - Harriette B. Burt 

Remember that SLOO will secure three nambers. If your 
subscription has run out, renew at once. 

The group of Cups and Saucers by Mrs, Cherry used as sup- 
plement in the May number also forms the frontispiece of our 
new Book of Cups and Saucers published on May 8th. A 
price of $1.50 has been placed on this book which will be at- 
tractive to all lovers of good designs. Postage Paid. 

We are booking orders NOW for prompt delivery 

Keramic Studio Pub. Co., 
Syracuse, N. Y. 



Book of 
Cups and Saucers 

$1.30 Post Paid 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CG. 

Syracuse, N. Y. 



E-E--"R HTM EL. F"( R_E— /=\_U I V^EL- 



CONTRIBUTORS 



z 



JESSIE M* BARD 
KATHRYN E. CHERRY 
SARAH RYEL COMER 
CLARA L. CONNOR 
HALLIE DAY 
MARY H. EEWSMITH 
LOUIS FRANCHET 
KATE CLARK GREENE 
LENA E, HANSCOM 
MARGARET LATHAM 
HANNAH B» OVERBECK 
DRUSILLA PAIST 
HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST 
RUTH M. RUCK 
.AXICEB.SHARRARD 
TE ANNE M. STEWART 
JORAE.TILDEN 
WILLIAM G. WmTFORD 
C. L. WIARD 



-:--al %v^- 



AUGUST MCMXIII Price 40c. Yearly Subscription $4.00 



f\ nONTfllY nflGftZINE FOR TME f^^ 



The entire contents of this Magazine are covered by the general copyright, and the articles must not be reprinted without special permission 

CONTENTS OF AUGUST, 1913 



Editorial Notes 

Thistles (Sapplement) 

Technical Stady on the Decoration of Art Ceramics (Continacd) 

Red Clover 

Cops and Saucers 

Japanese Tomato Berries 

Borders 

Violets 

Ctip and Saucer 

Rabbit Border 

Plate and Border 

Cup and Saucer 

Panel 

Bowl or Plate Design 

Bowl 

Borders 

Wild Rose Conventional Border 

Pine Cone Motif Border 

Lunch Set, Cup and Saucer 

Butter and Eggs 

Trumpet Creeper 

Answers to Correspondents 

Negundo Acaroides, Box Elder 



Jeanne M. Stewart 
Louis Franchet 
C. L. Wiard 
Kathryn E. Cherry 
Drosilla Paist 
Margaret Latham 
Lena E. Hanscom 
Mary H. Fewsmith 
Sarah Ryel Comer 
Henrietta Barclay Paist 
Lena E. Hanscom 
Henrietta Barclay Paist 
Cora E. Tilden 
Clara L. Connor 
Ruth M. Ruck 
Kate Clark Greene 
Hallie Day 
Alice B. Sharrard 
Lena E. Hanscom 
Wilham G. Whitf ord 

Hannah B. Overbecfc 



Page 

71 
71 

72-74-76-78 
73 
75 

77-79-80-81 
78-84-92 
82-83 
82 
83 
84 
84 
85 
86 
87 
88 
88 
88 
89 
90 
91 
92 
92-93 



<€" 



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COST LTTTLE TO OPERATE 



The only fuels which give perfect results in 
Glaze and Color Tone 




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No. 3 Si*e 16 X 19 in 40.00 j Gas Kiln 2 sizes 

WRITE FOR DISCOUNTS. 

STEARNS, FITCH & CO., 



/ No. i Site 10 X 12 bu ^J5.0C 

Clwcoal Kiln 4 size*. ! ^^ ^ Si»e 16 x 12 in. 20.00 

J No. 3 Size J6 x 15 in. 25.00 

I No. 4 Sl2« 18 X 26 ia. 50.00 

SPRINGFIELD, OHIO 



Vol. XV. No. 4. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



August 191 3 




MILE awhile, and while you smile, 
another smiles, and soon there's 
miles and miles of smiles and life's 
worth while, because you smile." 
We found this not long ago on an 
advertising card and it seemed worth 
keeping in mind and passing along. 
And smiles are not the only things 
that are catching. Did you ever 
notice in your ceramic class how the 
contagion spreads from one to another — Miss Jones comes 
in out of sorts and begins to fuss and find fault; before long 
she gets on Miss Smith's nerves and Miss Brown upsets her 
turpentine on her finished work; everything goes wrong and 
the morning is spoiled. Another day a pupil starts a vase 
with a bird decoration and soon there are "miles and miles" 
of birds in that studio, or some member of the class starts 
seriously studying design and one by one the other students 
take it up with increasing ardor, so it stands us in good stead, 
if we ever set anything going, to consider before hand what 
the effect will be on those about us. We are not unlike the 
proverbial flock of sheep; if one will lead the rest will follow. 
And it is much more satisfying to feel that you have started 
something worth while. It has been interesting to watch 
this principle developed in the summer school. Everyone 
started on FVench china. Then one started on Sedji wave 
and soon a dozen were at it. Then another started Satsuma 
and soon the entire class of thirty odd were decorating Sat- 
suma ware. One student started a decoration with Dove 
Grey and some other color combination then almost every 
member of the class had to have a Dove Grey combination. 
Every one started decorations in soft dusted colors, some one 
started enamels, then all must have enamels. One must 
have "compromise" decorations with a little panel or inlet 
of naturalistic roses, etc., at intervals. Then others who 
had not before ventured to ask for anything so reactionary, 
found that they must have some little thing done in this fashion 
for pot boilers. But for one thing we have been truly thank- 
ful — one lady came saying she would and must have natur- 
alistic decorations on her china. But not one other has fol- 
lowed her lead. And talking about smiles: You know our 
teacher has a most charming smile and cheerful spirit and 
as to "following the leader!" you should hear the chatter and 
shouts of laughter that from time to time cause the echoes 
to vibrate over Robineau Hill. No wonder our school is 
popular! 



Don't forget to work on competition designs this summer. 
We have more designs on hand than we can use "in a month 
of Sundays" but we shall manage to find room for our compe- 
tition work just the same. Be sure to execute your design 
carefully and neatly with spotless washes and good firm 
drawing. Good execution goes a long way in judging de- 
signs. Do not use too rough a paper, do not use brown paper, 
only light grey or white, write your name and address on back 
of design. Let us have "the best ever" this year in the 
Christmas issue. 



THISTLES (Supplement) 

Jeanne M. Stewart 

PALETTE— Violet, Pansy, Grey, Shading Green, Banding 
Blue, Yellow Green, Brown Green, Lemon Yellow, 
Yellow Brown, Wood Brown. 

The flowers are laid in with Violet shaded with a tone of 
two-thirds Violet and one-third Pansy, except in darkest blos- 
soms where Pansy alone is used. A little Banding Blue may 
be used in all of the greens for leaves. 

Stewart's Grey is the basis of the background, various 
shades being obtained by adding either Banding Blue, Shading 
Green or Pansy. The bright touch of Lemon Yellow and Yel- 
low Brown adds variety. 

In applying the background the second time in the third 
fire, let it run over the edges of some of the design and pad 
evenly. By dusting, this will give a soft underglaze effect. 

RED CLOVER (Page 73) 

Treatment by Kathryn E. Cherry 

FLOWERS are painted in with Blood Red and a little 
Ruby, the light side should be quite a little lighter, 
using less of the Ruby. Leaves are painted in with Apple 
Green and Shading Green warmed with Brown Green, the 
stems ai'e Mauve and Blood Red, the shadow backgi'ound 
is Banding Blue and a little Blood Red. 

Second firing — Paint the background with Copenhagen 
Blue, Violet and touches of Blood Red, use same colors used 
in first firing for the leaves and flowers. 



SHOP NOTE 

M. T. Wynne, importer of white china, so long located 
at 39 W. 21st Street, New York, N. Y., removed on July 1st, 
to her new location 52 W. 36th Street. 

STUDIO NOTE 

Miss Charlotte Kroll formerly of 54 E. 124th St., New 
York, N. Y., has formed a partnership with Mrs. F. N. Water- 
field, and will carry on the Domestic Art Studio, 149 Wash- 
ington St., Newark, N. J. where she will continue her classes 
in porcelain decoration. 

ANOTHER COMPLIMENT 

The Supervisor of Drawing, at the Gloversville, N. Y. 
High School, and a Pratt graduate, writes : 

"Have used the Keramic Studio in the High School design 
classes and have secured some splendid results'." 

A NEW CALIFORNIA ART POTTERY 
Fred. H. Rhead, well known to Keramic Studio subscribers, 
is managing a new pottery in Mission Canyon close to the 
Santa Barbara Mission and sends us interesting illustrations 
of his work 



72 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




No. 7. Modern application of primiihe processes. Marblehead pottery. Designs in fixed colored glazes with incLsed outlines. 

TECHNICAL STUDY ON THE DECORATION OF ART The mixture must be perfectly homogeneous, conse- 

CERAMICS— (Continued) quently well gi'ound. 

Louis Franchei Another example of blue coloring: 
Inlaid Decoration Cobalt oxide 8) 

INCISED decoration has led to another process, inlaid decor- ^ """^ °'!'^'' -fl ^""^^ 
ation, that is, incisions are filled with coloring matters, i:'egmatite 50 j 

generally clay slip or ochres. One must not imagine that in- Green coloring: 

laid decoration is similar to slip painting. These two processes Pegmatite 30 \ 

give absolutely different decorative effects. And modern Kaolin 18/ 

artists could to advantage use inlaid decoration with all kinds Zinc oxide .45 fritted 

of bodies, since we know how to color the latter at will. cobalt oxide it 

Colored slips must be rich in oxides. For instance for a Chrome oxide 6 ' 

blue slip: Pegmatite 70 These examples will be sufficient to give a general idea of the 

Cobalt oxide 30 question. 

This is ground in water, fritted, ground again, then blue slips These colored slips may be used either to make the piece 

of various tones are made. If the clay used contains iron, itself, or for the inlaying. Inlaid pieces may be either glazed 

tones will vary from grey to black (especially in presence of or left unglazed. 
manganese). 
Blue slips: 

Frit as above 1 2 5 10 15 20 

White slip 99 98 95 90 85 80 








Recent application of primitive process. English slip-ware plate, about 1680. 
Inlaid decoration. The plate was made in a mould which left the 
outlines of the decoration in reUef, and the hollow spaces were afterward 
partially filled in with slips. The execution is very crude and imperfect 
and far below the fine work of the primitives. In the Metropolitan 
Museimi of Art, New Yorli. 



. Primilive processes. Precolombian pottery from Lambayecjue (Peru) 
Incised and excised decoration. Prom the Berthon collection, Paris. 






SCOTCH THISTLES J E A N N E M. STEWA RT 



AUGUST 1913 

SUPPLEMENT TO 

KERAMIC STUDIO 



KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



73 




RED CLOVER— C. L. WIARD 



(Treatment page 71) 



74 



nilRAMlC STUDIO 




No. 12. Modem appHcalion of primitive process. Egg shell porcelain cup by Ade- 
laide Alsop-Robineau. Incised decoration with excised border and central 
medallion. This piece was photographed in the biscuit, before glazing 
and plainly iUustrates the difference between incised and excised decora- 
tion. 

If they are to be glazed, with of course translucent glazes, 
one may obtain very fine decorations by using colored glazes of 
a tone harmonizing with the color of the inlaid design. One 
might, for instance, use for the piece itself a light blue slip, 
inlay a design with dark blue, and cover the whole with a light 
gi'een glaze. This would give a general coloration of extremely 
interesting blue green tones. 

One may also use the metallic iridescence of reducing 
firing. The incised design may be filled with lustrous glazes, 
such as I described in this Magazine four years ago, that is, 
glazes or enamels containing salts of silver, copper and bis- 
muth.* The design in iridescent colors will then appear on 
the background of the unglazed pottery. If one has used a 
porous body, and this is advisable, the intense smoking neces- 
sary for the formation of the iridescence will color the piece 
black, an intense black which, by rubbing, will become a 
beautiful lustrous tone, as I explained before. The copper 

*See Keramic Studio, March, 1908. 




No. 9. Modern applicalion of primitive process. Porcelain vase bv Adelaide Aisop 
Robineau. Inlaid poppy decoration. The design is incised and the 
incision filled with pink and green porcelain slips. Tlie decorative effect 
is quite different from the effect obtained with slip painting under the glaze. 

iridescence will be the best, also the green iridescence pro- 
duced by silver and bismuth. 

To obtain another kind of iridescence over white back- 
gi'ound, one might fill the incisions with ordinary glazes and, 
after firing, cover them with the lustres of the oxidising muffle 
firing. 

In using glazes to fill the incisions, it is important to use 
only glazes which do not flow. 

It might also be interesting to burn the incised piece, 




No. 11. Modern application of primitive processes. Handbuilt black pottery by Edith Field. Excised and modeled decoration. 



heramic studio 



75 




CUPS AND SAUCERS 

KATHRYN E. CHERRY 

(Treatment page 83) 




No. 4 



76 



hlEramic studio 




No. 13. Recent application of primitive process. Chinese white porcelain bowl. 
Kang Hsi period, 1662-1722. Excised decoration. From tlie Avery 
collection m the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New Yorlc. 




before the inlaying, and fill the incisions with enamels maturing 
in the low muffle firing. 

The inlaying must always be level with the background, 
never raised higher. 

Excised Decoration 

We have seen that inlaid decoration was born from in- 
cised decoration. 

Excised decoration is quite different. It is obtained by 
scraping away the background until the design stands out in 
relief. 

Although it may seem strange at first, it is impossible to 
obtain by mould work exactly the same decorative effect. 

Excised decoration was practiced nearly 2000 years ago 
by the Italo-Greek potters. It may be considered as nearly 




Beceni application of primitive process. Chinese white porcolain vase 
K'ang Hsi period, 1662-1722. Excised perforated decoration From 
the Avery collection in the MetropoUtan Museum of Art, New York 



completely abandoned to-day, not for reasons of an aesthetic 
order, but for purely economical causes. 

The National Manufactory of Sevres attempted about 
1894 to use this interesting process of decoration, but by a 
purely mechanical method. The design was traced on the 
body of the vase with some kind of a resist varnish, very ad- 
hesive and acid proof, then the vase was immersed in a diluted 
fluorhydric acid bath, the acid attacking the parts not covered 
with the resist. When the background was thus etched out 
to a depth of about two millimeters, the vase was thoroughly 
washed, the varnish was removed, and the excised decoration 
appeared in relief on the etched backgi-ound. 

As an example of excised decoration made, not by me- 
chanical means, but entirely by hand, I could not do better 
than to mention the truly remarkable vase executed two years 




Modern application of primitive process. Porcelain lantern by 
Adelaide Alsop-Robineau. Excised and perforated decoration 
The Satyr figures are in pate sur pate relief work. It would be 
Impossible to reproduce such a piece by mould work 



Modern process. Stone-gJazed stoneware. Designed and executed by a 
student of the Pennsylvania School of Fine Arts. Excised and modeled 
decoration. The piece thrown on the wheel, was modeled on the fresh 
clay, tlie minor features pressed in with a circular stamp, and the lines 
scored m wnh a pointed tool. .All modern work of this kind on low fire 
pottery bodies or stoneware wiU naturally be done while the piece is wet, 
as It IS so much easier and quicker. The decorative effect is however 
somewhat different from work on the drj' paste. On porcelain which can- 
not be worked damp the work must be done on the dry paste and is infi- 
nitely more difficult and slow. 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



77 




JAPANESE TOMATO BERRIES— DRUSILLA PAIST 



78 



RERAMIC STUDIO 





They will obtain a very interesting excised decoration by do- 
ing what did the old Italo-Greek potters, that is, by using com- 
mon potteries firing at rather low temperatm-es, 800° C. or so. 



No. 16. Recenl applicaiion of primitive process. Chinese egg shell porcelain lant- 
ern in tlie Salting collection. London. K'ang H.si period, 1662-1722. 
Excised and perforated decoration. These e.xcised Chinese lanterns are 
rare and extremely valuable, the most .simple ones bringing at auction 
several thousand do ars. They are all painted over the glaze -ivith the low 
Are enamels of the famlUe rose or famille verte. But however perfect the 
overglaze painting, their great technical merit Ues in the fine, difflcult 
excised work in the thin paste. 

ago by Mrs. Adelaide A. Robineau, a porcelain vase with a 
scarab decoration beautifully excised by this clever artist.* 

But porcelain work is not within the means of all artists. 
Many must use a material less difficult to handle and fire. 

*As Mr. Franchet mentions Mrs. Robineau's excised work, we illustrate 
one of her recent porcelains (the scarab vase was illustrated in August 1911 
Keramic Studio), also some interesting old Chinese porcelains of the same 
kind, excised and perforated. Hand perforation is only a development of 
incised or excised decoration, the cutting being continued until perforation. 
When the perforations are filled with glaze, the result, after firing is what is 
known as the rice pattern of the Chinese. Very interesting and beautiful 
open work or perforated porcelains have been made in modern times in 
European factories, Worcester, Sevres, Dresden, etc. But these are made in 
moulds, consequently by a mechanical process and pieces are repeated. Ex- 
cised and hand perforated pieces such as the Chinese lanterns or the recent 
work of Mrs. Robineau are of an absolutely different character. 



A 




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No. IS. Modern industrial process. Worcester porcelain vase. Perforated decora- 
tion made by mould work. By courtesy of John H. Drake, Syracuse, N. Y. 

The excising may be done either on raw or on biscuit. 
In the first case there is danger of slight deformation of the 
design, especially with bodies rich in alumina which shrink 
heavily in firing. Glaze may be applied either on raw or pre- 
ferably on biscuit. Glazes applied on biscuit will have to be 
mixed with gum tragacanth or fucus. Great care will have to 
be given to this glazing, so that glazes used on the etched back- 
ground will not mix with those of the relief design. With 
the great variety of combinations which may be obtained from 
modern glazes, it will be realized that this process offers a large 
field for beautiful decorative effects. 

(to be continued) 



^ ^ 




No. 17. Recent process. Chinese porcelain vase of K'ang Hsi period with rice 
pattern. The incised design is perforated and the perforations are filled 
with glaze. 



BORDER— MARGARET LATHAM 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

OUTLINE design and dust outline with Dark Blue for 
Dusting then clean edges and fire. Second firing — oil 
the wide spaces and dust with Water Green No. 2. 



heramic studio 



79 




DETAIL DRAWINGS OF JAPANESE TOMATO BERRY 
DRUSILLA PAIST 



80 



HERAMIC STUDIO 




DESIGNS FROM THE JAPANESE TOMATO BERRY 

Drusilla Paist 

UNIT could be adapted to large salad bowl by the use 
of abstract lines design or panels to hold it to- 
gether. Colors — Berries of tomatoes, Red (Capucine); 
leaves and stems warm grey green; backgi'ound of unit, 
deep Neutral Yellow or Gold; design strongly outlined. 
If on a bowl the general tone of the bowl should be dull 
Neutral Yellow or old Ivory. The smaller fruit may be 
laid with green instead of red, or gi-een tinged with 
red. 

Unit for inside of bowl or top of catsup dish, or small 
box. See coloring for bowl. 



PLATE OR RELISH DISH, JAPANESE 
TOMATO BERRY MOTIF 

Drusilla Paist 

DISH ivory; design red and green, 
background of design and path Gold, 
Black outlines. 




nilRAMIC STUDIO 



81 




PLATE, JAPANESE TOMATO BERRY MOTIF— DRUSILLA PAIST 

For plate tint with Ivory. Lay leaf and stem in Grey Green and cherry in Neutral Yellow, two values stronger than the 

Ivory of the background. Outline with Gold or Black. 




BANDS, JAPANESE TOMATO BERRY MOTIF— DRUSILLA PAIST 

These borders may be used for bowls, catsup dishes, etc. Coloring same as for bowl, same motif. Gold back-ground 

makes them very effective with black outlines. 



82 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




BORDERS— RUTH M. RUCK (Page 88) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 
No. 1. Oil and dust leaf forms with Florentine Green; 

the flower form is Cameo; the stem is Bright Green; center of 

flower is Lemon Yellow. 

No. 2. Thistle motif is done in gold for small plates and 

cups and saucers, then fired and filled in with pale gi'een 

enamels. 

No. 3. Violet border. Outline with black and fire; then 

dust the flowers with Mode, and the stems with Florentine 

Green. 

PINE CONE MOTIF BORDER (Page 88) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 
/^UTLINE design with black. Second fire, oil cones and 
V^ dust with Coffee Brown; then dust line spaces with 
Florentine Green. 



o 



WILD ROSE BORDER (Page 88) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 
UTLINE with Black, then fire; oil leaves and dust with 
Apple Green; oil flowers and dust with Cameo. 



^ ^ 



STUDY OF VIOLETS— HELENA E. HANSCOM 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

OUTLINE with Grey for Flesh and fire; then paint leaves 
with Apple Green and Shading Green for darker tones 
and Yellow Green for lighter tones; the stems are Mauve and 
Apple Green; the flowers are Mauve and Banding Blue for 
dark tones, and Deep Blue Green and Violet for lighter tones. 



TRUMPET CREEPER (Page 91) 

Treatment by Kathryn E. Cherry 
npms sheet can be nicely adapted for conventional designs, 
J- good motif for tankards, jardinieres. Design is outlined 
in Grey for Flesh; the flowers are Painting Yellow, shaded to 
Yellow Red; the leaves are Moss Green and Brown Green. 
For background use Yellow Brown, Brown Green and Blood 
Red. 




CUP AND SAUCER— MARY H. FEWSMITH 

Treatment by Jessie M.Bard 

OUTLINE design in India Ink; then oil dark 
places and dust with Dove Grey; then oil Violet 
and dust with Yellow for Dusting; the centers and stems 
• are Green Gold. 




RERAMIC STUDIO 



83 




^ 



CUPS AND SAUCERS (Page 75) 

Kathryn E. Cherry 
No. 3 — Rose Motive 

TRACE the design in and ink it, then oil the green places 
and dust with Water Lily Green, then oil the rose form 
and dust with two parts Pink and one part Cameo, then oil the 
bands and dust with Mode. 

Second Fire — Touch up the places where the colors are 
uneven then fire 

Third Fire — Oil the entire cup and dust with Cameo. 

No. 4 — Panel Cap 

Ink in the design, then dust the panels with Deep Ivory, 
then dust the flower form with Yellow for Dusting, then oil 
the green leaves; dust with Florentine Green. The little red 
spots are painted with Yellow Red. Then paint in the gold. 

Second Fire — Paint in the dusted places with the dusted 
colors where colors are not even; then go over the gold again. 



VIOLET BUDS— HELENA E. HANSCOM 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

OUTLINE with the oil very thin, then dust with Copen- 
hagen Blue, then fire; oil the flowers and dust with 
Mode; the stems are dusted with Bright Green. 




RABBIT BORDER— S. R. COMER 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

OUTLINE design with Grey For Flesh very pale then 
fire. Then oil background and dust it with Grey Blue, 
then fire; then third fire oil entire border and dust with Pearl 
Grey 3 parts, 1 part Dove Grey. 




VIOLET LEAF AND FLOWERS— HELENA E. HANSCOM 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 
Outline forms and dust with Mode; the leaves are dusted 
with Water Lily Green; the flowers and buds are Mode. 



84 




HERAMIC STUDIO 



A 



^ 



•T M:©:J7 XF-Q-p' ^'o^Tr ^/qW 

' 'i " "- »' V — 

BORDER 

Henrietta Barclay Paist 
This little border is very attractive in gold for inside or 
outside border for bowls or steins. 



PLATE 

Henrietta Barclay Paist 

DO in gold (two coats) and burnish the outlines, veins of 
leaves and berries with the Agate paint. Keep the 
paint wet to avoid burning the gold. A pretty decoration in 
connection with the little border for inside of bowl. 



!> 


^ — -.^ — u«> 


Brr '■ — ' 

J L 


•^ _! 


i 

J 1 



BORDER— MARGARET LATHAM 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 
/^UTLINE design, dust with Grey For Flesh. Second 
v>^ firing— oil between lines and dust with Florentine 
Green. 




CUP AND SAUCER, VIOLET MOTIF— HELENA E. HANSCOM (Treatment by Jessie M. Bard) 

Outline and dust with Dove Grey. Second fire: Oil flowers and dust with Mode; the stems are oiled and dusted with 

Water Green No. 2 



REKAMIC STUDIO 



85 




PANEL— HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST 



Outline design with Black, water mixture. Tint with Neutral Gi^y or any soft grey, not too cold. Lay the leaves with 

Grey Green and the berries with Copenhagen Blue with a touch of Ruby and Black. 

Thistles are Grey Green and Violet of Iron. 



86 



heramic studio 




BOWL OR PLATE DESIGN— CORA E. TILDEN 



OUTLINE in Auburn Brown and a little Blood Red. Tint 
the large empty panels and center of plate with Yellow 
Brown and a little Brown Green. 

Second Fire — Paint flowers with a thin wash of Blood 



Red and a little Violet. Caps of flowers the Yellow Brown 
and Brown Green mixture. Leaves Brown Green and a lit- 
tle Moss Green. All other background a thin wash of Al- 
bert Yellow and a little Apple Green, 



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heramic studio 








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BORDERS— RUTH M. RUCK 






(Treatments page 82) 




WILD ROSE CONVENTIONAL BORDER— KATE CLARK GREENE (Treatment page 82) 




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PINE CONE MOTIF BORDER— HALLIE DAY 



(Treatment page 82) 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



89 




LUNCH SET, CUP AND SAUCER— ALICE B. SHARRARD (Treatment by Jessie M. Bard) 

Outline in gold. Second fire paint flower with 2 parts Albert Yellow and 1-2 Yellow Brown, the dark center is Yellow Red. 
Leaves, stems and bands are painted with Apple Green and a little Yellow and Violet. 



90 



HERAMIC STUDIO 




BUTTER AND EGGS— HELENA E. HANSCOM 

TO be painted in flat tones and outlined in Black. Flowers, Green and Pearl Grey 6-1 with Grey Green and Shading Green 

Primrose Yellow, shaded with Pearl Grey and thin wash 4-1 in shadows, 

of Brown Green in shadows. For deep tone in heart of flowers Background, Pearl Grey and Moss Green equal parts, 

Albert Yellow, with a touch of Carnation. Leaves, Apple warmed with a little Lemon Yellow. 



ftEKAMlC STUDIO 



91 



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RERAMIC STUDIO 



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BORDERS— MARGARET LATHAM 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

THESE borders are to be used on plates, cups and saucers 
in gold. Nos. 1 and 7 are good outlines to be used 
over bands of Gold, fired and then put in Black outline over 
the gold. 

^ If 
ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

L. H. H. — We do not know the cause of the rust spots on gold unless 
it is that you did not use unfluxed gold which should always be used over color. 

J. M. J. — Belleek may be rested against a piece of asbestos to prevent 
the rough places. Fry's Special Tinting Oil is used for ground-laying. We 
cannot answer the question in regard to bronze colors as we do not know what 
colors you refer to. There is a bronze gold that is a mat color, a bronze 
color can also be obtained by flowing Light Green Lustre quite heavily over 
fired gold. 

Keramic Subscriber — ^Coral enamel can be put on either thin or heavy. 
It will mix with other colors. It requires about a rose fire, too hot a fire 
turns it yellow, there is no other color with which you can get the same effect. 

2 — The trouble with your lustre is probably that of not having used a 
clean brush. Lustre brushes should be thoroughly cleaned in turpentine 
and then in alcohol and rushed back and forth across the hand until the al- 
cohol is all evaporated leaving the brush dry and soft before putting it away. 

3 — Floated enamels can be used on German china, but it is not safe to 
fire a second time unless they are very thin. 

For light colored enamels use 4 parts Relief White, 1 part Hancock's 
Hard White Enamel and a touch of Flux and add any color that you wish 
to use. 

For dark enamels mix the color that you wish and add 1-S Relief White- 

H. — Flat enamels means to apply the enamels in a thin wash. They 
are not much heavier than color is applied. 

For enamels use four parts Relief White, one part Hard White Enamel 
and a bit of flux and add color desired for the light enamels. Use a bone 
knife for mixing, grind thoroughly. Use the tube Rehef White, add a very 
little lavender oil before grinding and then thin to the proper consistency 
with lavender as you use it. 




NEGUNDO ACAROIDES BOX ELDER- 
HANNAH B. OVERBECK 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



93 




NEGUNDO AC^ROIDES BOX ELDER— HANNAH B. OVERBECK (Treatment by Kathryn E. Cherry) 

Outline with Black, then fire. Second fire — Paint pods with Yellow Brown and Brown Green and the leaves with Apple Green, 
Brown Green and Shading Green. The stems are Brown Green and Violet. 



4.^ 



ri:ramic studio 



REUSCH E'S 
PATENT ROMAN GOLD 



HI 
ffliM CILl 

United Stmm Bum No. 975n8.NovEHOT IPISID. 
This tjox of Gold u guaranteed to be, an absolutely 
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HOW TO OPEN THE PATENT GOLD 



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Price per ounce bottle, 25c 
" " small " 10c 

"ELARCO" 
FLEXIBLE RULER 




12 in. long, graduated to 1-8 inch, per piece, 20c 
18 in. long, graduated to 1-16 inch, per piece, 30c 

The ELAKCO Flexible Ruler is an indispensable addition 
to the working table of the Keramjc Artist, and especial- 
ly for conventional style of decoration. This Ruler owing 
to its flexibility can be used on any surface, whether 
straight or curved. As the Ruler is backed by a strip of 
slightly narrower rubber, raising it a trifle from the object, 
the artist can follow the edge with a pen without blur- 
ring. The rubber prevents the ruler from slipping 
by using ELARCO Wax the same can be held in pi; 



BUTTERFLY 
STILTS 




These stilts are placed inside of Cups, Bowls, 
etc., to prevent interference with interior 
decoration and are also wonderful space sav- 
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Size No. 1 , 10c ; No. 2, 15c ; No. 3, 20c pr doz 



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FRENCH 
and GERMAN 
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For both Hard and Soft Glazes 
Write for samples and price list 



COLORS '^-MATERIALS ■^°'' ™^ KERAMIC ART 

SEND FOR OUR ENCYCLOPAEDIC CATALOGUE 



L. REUSCHE &CO., 12 Barclay St., NEW YORK 

IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS 



When writing to advertisers please mention this magazine 



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Book of 
Cups and Saucers 

$1.30 Post Paid 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 

Syracuse, N. Y. 



K-E-EL,-R T^M El. F"l R. 



V^^^^El-. 



CONTRIBUTORS 



JESSIE m; bard 

HARRIETTE B. BURT 

KATHRYN E. CHERRY 

CLARA L. CONNOR 

ALICE W. DONALDSON 

LOUIS FRANCHET 

ALBERT W. HECKMAR 

HELENA E» HANSGOM 

HANNAH B. OVERBECK 

IDA UPTON PAINE 

HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST 

GELIA C POPE 

EDNA MANN SHOVER 

ST. MARY^S ACADEMY AND COLLEGE 

TOPEKA CERAMIC ART CLUB 

C L, WIARD 



SEPT. MCMXIII Price 40c. Yearly Subscription $4.00 



f\ noMTHLY nmmi m in i potter amd de coRf^TOR- 



The entire contents of this Magazme are covered by the general copyright, and the articles must not be reprinted without special permission 

CONTENTS OF SEPTEMBER, I9t3 



Editorial Notes 

Topeka Ceramic Art Club Exhibit 

St. Mary's Academy and College, Portland, Ore., Exhibit 

Japanese Lantern Plant 

Technical Study of the Decoration of Art Ceramics (Concid) 

Fish Studies 

Thorn Vine 

Cineraria 

Breakfast Set 

Tea Caddy Nasturtium 

Bowl, Nasturtium 

Tray, Nasturtium 

Plates and Tea Pot, Nasturtium 

Pitcher, Nasturtium 

California Poppies 

Study and Design for Ground Cherries 

Phisalis (Supplement) 

Ground Cherries 

Punch Bowl 

Answers to Correspondents 

Cups and Saucers 

Tea Tile 

Bowl with Floral Motif 



C. L. Wiard 
Louis Franchet 
Edna Mann Shover 
Alice W. Donaldson 
Ida Upton Paine 
AJbert W. Heckman 
Hannah B. Overbeck 
Hannah B. Overbeck 
Hannah B. Overbeck 
Hannah B. Overbeck 
Hannah B. Overbeck 
Helena E. Hanscom 
Henrietta Barclay Paist 
Harriette B. Burt 
Henrietta Barclay Paist 
Celia C. Pope 

Kathryn E. Cherry 
Clara L, Connor 
Clara L. Connor 



Page 

95 

96 

96 

97 

98, 100, 102 

99 

lOI 

103 

104-105 

106 

106 

107 

108-109 

no 
in 

112 
112 
113 
U4 
IH 
115 
116 
U6 



(6 dt 

THE OLD RELIABLE i^Em FITCH KILNS 




The thousands of these Kilns in use testify to 
their Good Qualities 



THE ORIGINAL PORTABLE KILN 



INEXPENSIVE TO BUY 
CX)ST LmXE TO OPERATE 




•e 



The only fuels which give perfect results in 
Gl&ze and Color Tone 

No. 2 S1««I4 s 12 to 430.00 ) „^ ^ / Na. I Sl«e 10 x « Ib. JI6.8C 

No. 3 Sbe 16 X J9 fa_^ 4O.OO Ga. Kfla 2 sixes ^^ Kfla 4 ri^. ^^^ ^ Sb. W x 12 faw. 30.00 

No. 3 Sb« 16 X IS la. 28.00 

WRITE FOR DISCOUNTS. ( Neu 4 Stee I8 x 36 hi. 56.00 

STEARNS, FITCH & CO., SPRINGFIELD, OHIO 



Vol. XV. No. 5. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



September 19 1 3 




T seems to us thc.t no more valuable 
editorial could be given you this 
month than this letter, which has 
just been received and which we 
publish in full: 

Topeka, Kansas 
Our club, called the Ceramic Art 
Club, having read your most excel- 
lent article in the February number 
of Keranric Studio, concerning the 
proper value of club organization, the president asked me to 
tell a little of our club, which has just completed a most har- 
monious fourteen years of existence. 

Our aim has been first and foremost, educational, rather 
than financial, and we are all agreed that therein lies our 
chief reason for existing so long and harmoniously as we have. 
Soon after joining the Club I made a visit to a city con- 
siderably larger than ours in a nearby state and called at a 
number of studios. When I inquired about club organiza- 
tion they said, "We can't keep up any membership," and 
asked how we managed to do it, so I came home with the 
thought in mind to find out the reason and benefit of club 
membership. 

When I say our first aim is educational rather than 
financial, it is not because we were born with silver spoons 
in our mouths, so to speak, and need not the money, in fact, 
most of the members are indeed glad of the income derived 
from sale of china, orders, and instruction, (and some are 
entirely dependent on this income). We have teachers in 
our club far above the average, who make a profitable liveli- 
hood in keramic art and bring to us the best things from their 
travels and study with the foremost china decorators. With 
the aid of these leaders in our club, we aim to maintain a cer- 
tain standard of work and in this way the financial part seems 
to be solved. 

We endorse the statement that there is a certain public 
for each sort of work and that it does not pay to run down 
another's work and this, in part, is the secret of our loyalty 
and good fellowship. Then we have never known what it 
means to strive for office. We have no agreement that we 
shall boost some certain friend for office, but go to the meeting 
with the idea of bestowing the oflSces upon those who will 
be induced to accept. 

Instead of selling articles at our yearly exhibit, we simply 
invite the public to enjoy the display with us and, later, those 
who would buy or give orders, go to the several studios or 
friends to make their negotiations. 

The expenses attached to the displays have been small 
as one of the members, having a suitable room, has, yearly, 
generously opened her home for the exhibit, and this year the 
Y. W. C. A. is asking us to exhibit in their rooms. So, without 
effort or expense, we are provided a good place for exhibition. 
At present we have a club-membership of twenty-two, 
and for the last year's work each member was to exhibit five 
original pieces. We are sending photographs of some of the 
original work on display. 

But, aftei' all, work is for the worker, and in our efforts 
to raise our standards and work up to our ideals, ("Creation, 
not Imitation," is our Club Motto) we have no time nor 



desire for petty jealousies nor personal laudation, our leaders 
being lerge hearted, large minded and knowing that the way 
of attainment in club organization is not by selfish effort, but 
by hearty co-operation. 

E. BUnn. 

We add a resume of the year book of the Topeka Ceramic 
Club as an object lesson to all interested in club work. It 
is tastefully printed on good paper and shows that the work 
is carefully planned ahead so that all know toward what 
subjects they are working and on what to be informed. In 
small details it could vary in different locations but in the 
main it makes a good model upon which to form a working 
ceramic club. 

The heights by great men reached and kept, 

Were not attained by sudden flight; 
But they, while their companions slept, 

Were plodding upward in the night. 

Club Motto: Not Imitation, but Creation is the aim. — Emerson. 

Club Flower : The Rose. 

Program: Names of ladies entertaining, roll call, business session, 
I'eading of papers, social hour, class day. 

Officers: President, Mrs. .]. S. Ensminger; Vice President, Mrs. W. P. 
liishop; Secretary, Mrs. C. C. Hammond; Treasurer, Mrs. J. H. Stuart. 

The class day lessons directed by Miss Kathaleen McNutt. 

The last sentence of Section 3, Rule 4, of the "Rules of the Topeka Cer- 
amic Art Club" reads: Members failing to comply with the program shall 
be fined one dollar. 

September Sixth : "^^acation echoes, Tallv on Color Harmony, Discus- 
sion, Texas Clay. 

September Twenty-seventh: Class Day. 

October Eleventh: Demonstration on Luster, Designed Cup and Sau- 
cer, Selected Subject. 

October Twenty-fifth: Class Day. 

Ncvcmbcr Eighth: What Interests Me in China, Discussion, A Lesson 
f<n Original Bowl. 

November Twenty-second: Class Day. 

January Third: PajKi-r: Inspirational Design, Discussion, Where I 
Go lor Origin in Design. 

January Seventeenth: Class Da)'. 

January Thirty-first: What 1 know of Enamels, .Ancient Ornament 
as Applied to Keramics. 

February Fourteenth: Class Day. 

February Twenty-eighth: Original Plate to be designed by Miss Wit- 
wer to be interpreted by each member of the Club for the exhibit. Evolution 
of Ceramic Decoration. 

March Fourteenth: Class Day. , 

March Twenty-eighth : My Conversion from the Naturalistic to the 
Conventional, Discussion, Designers of to-day, Election of officers. 

April Eleventh : Class Day. 

A)iril Twenty-fifth : In what way have I derived benefit from the work 
of the Club, Discussion, Color in Nature. 

Maj' Ninth: AVhat Design Has Done for Me, Discussion, Finished 
Conventional Piece, Ideas Gathered by the Way. 

May Twenty-Second and Third: Fourteenth Annual Exhibit, Thurs- 
day and Friday, Aftei'noons and Evenings. The Ceramic Art Club with 
the aim to make its high calling and purpose clear endeavors each year to 
give to Topeka the progressive step obtained, and by continual advancement 
each succeeding twelth month will show determined study and the right 
interpretation of decorated china. 

RULES OF THE CLUB 

RULE I. 

Section 1. This Club shall be called "Topeka Ceramic Art Club." 

Section 2. The object of this club shall be the promotion of friendly' 

intercourse among china decorators, encouragement of Ceramic Art and 

study of Histoiy of Manufacture and Decoration of Pottery. 



% 



KEKAMIC STUDIO 




TOPEKA CERAMIC ART CLUB EXHIBIT 

Punch Set, M 



Top Row — ^Jardiniere, Mrs. Stuart. Bowl, Mrs. .Jones. Punch Set, Mrs, Boone, 

Bowl, Mrs. Doneyson. Vase, Mrs. Gulp. 
2nd Row — Bowl. Mrs. Swartz. Bowl. Mrs. Boone. Bowl, Mrs. Stevens. Sandwich 

Plate, Mrs. Stuart. Bowl, Mrs. Bishop. Jelly Jar, Mrs. Bishop. 
3rd Row — Dresser Set, Mrs. Jones. Vase, Mrs. Blinn. Va.se, Mrs. Ware. Toilet Set 

Mrs. McDonough. Va.se. Miss Lindsey. Tea .Set. Mrs. Blinn. Toilet Set, 

Mrs. Lyman. 

RULE II. 

Section ] . Tliis club shall consist of active and honorary members. 
Only active members can take part in the business of the club or hold office. 

Section 2. The membership shall be limited to thirty. Application 
for membership shall be made at one meeting through some member of the 
club in good standing and voted upon at the succeeding meeting — admit- 
tance to the club requiring an unanimous vote of members present. 

Section 3. Each active member shall be required to exhibit five or 
more pieces at the annual exhibit. All pieces may be for sale and a commis- 
sion of ten per cent, paid the club. Circumstances rendering compUance 
with this rule impossible must be reported to the President and she shall 
grant exemption from this duty if she deems it expedient. "To become an 
active member the appUcant must comply with the rules of the annual ex- 
hibit." 

Section 4. Re-instatement of former members shall be at the pleasiu'e 
of the club if the membership is not fuU. 

RULE III. 

Section I. The officers of the club shall be President, Vice-President, 
Secretary and Treasurer, these officei's to be elected by written ballot at the 
annual meeting and shall form the executive committee. 
RULE IV. 

Section 1. The club shall hold regular meetings semi-monthl,y. 



Top Row— Tray, Miss Mayhew. Plate, Mrs. Stevens. 

Plate, Mrs. Stevens. Tray. Mrs. Bishop. 
2ncl Row — Enamel Bo.x. Miss Lindsey. Vase, Miss Hammond. Nut Set, Miss 

AVitmer. Plate, Miss Witmer. Nut Set. Mrs. Hammond. Tankard, Mrs. 

Stuart. 
3rd Row— Tea Pot, Mrs. Stevens. Tea Caddy. Miss Fuller. Jardiniere, Mrs. Ens- 

rainger. Incense Jar, Aliss Berry. Landscape, Mrs. Blinn. Jardiniere, 

Mrs. Hammond. Plate, Mrs " 



Compote, Mrs. Booae- 



Section 2. "Unexcused absence from three consecutive meetings shall 
be considered equivalent to resignation and the delinquent member shall 
be notified by the Secretary and if not excused or in attendance at the next 
regular meeting of the club her name shall be stricken from the roll." 

Section 3. Members shall be fined ten cents for absence unless seriously 
ill or absent from the city and five cents for tardiness at meetings. Mcmbei-s 
failing to comply with the program shall be fined one. dollar. 

Section 4. The annual election of officers shall take place at the regular 
March meeting. Seven members shall constitute a quorum. 

Section 5. The member.ship fee .shall be one dollar and seventy-five 
cents. AU membership fees must be jiaid at time of annual exhibit and no 
member allowed to exhibit work without payincnl, of dues. All jier.sons 
admitted to the club after the exhibit shall pay an admi.ssion fee of one dollar. 

Order of business: — Calling the roll, reading and adopting minutes of 
last meeting, communications, reports of committees, settlement of accounts. 
unfinished business, new business, program. 

RULE V. 

Section 1. Foregoing rules maybe altered at a. regular or special meet- 
ing appointed by the President for the purpose. 

Section 2. Notice of such meeting shall be given bj' the Secretary. 




ST. MARY'S ACADEMY AND COLLEGE, PORTLAND, OREGON 
MAUDE BROSNAN 





ST. MARY'S ACADEMY AND COLLEGE, PORTLAND, OREGON 
LOUISE ROESCH 



ST. MARY'S ACADEMY AND COLLEGE, PORTLAND, OREGON 
HELEN CLEMONS 

WILD WOODS DESIGN COMPETITION 
CLOSES OCTOBER 10, 1913 

In the editorial of June, 1913, we advised you to go to the 
woods for inspiration with a view to taking part in the fall 
competition for conventionalisations of wild flowers. This 
competition will close October 10th. Make your careful draw- 
ing of flower, leaf and stem, then make conventionalised units 
of flower and leaf, a page of these, then a page of semi-conven- 
tionalised designs, i. e., small flower panels connected with 
conventional or geometrical design or small semi-conventional 
flower arrangements of borders, finally a page of conventional 
designs applied to straight and curved edges, all from the same 
flower. 

For details and prizes see last page of cover. 



HEKAMIC STUDIO 



97 




.j^- 







JAPANESE LANTERN PLANT— C. L. WIARD 



(Treatment page 106) 



98 



REKAMIC STUDIO 




No. 19. Modern application of pri?nilive procens. .Japanese bowl, inlaid decoration . , 
The Incisions in the brown bod\ aio filled with white slip This style of 
decoration was very much used b>- old Corean potters. (This iUustration 
should have, been published in Aiuiusl issue unlaid drcoration) hut was not 
ready in time.) 

TECHNICAL STUDY ON THE DECORATION OF ART 
CERAMICS~(ConcI«ded) 

Louis Franchet 
Excised Decoration (continued) 

THE excising on biscuit or fired body was practiced on a 
large scale by Italo-Greek potters, but only on ceram- 
ics previously covered with the beautiful black enamel which 
was used by nearly all the old potters of the Mediterranean 
sea countries. The following method was used : 

Using a pottery body of fine grain and only slightly colored 
with iron oxide, they applied a very thin and very regular coat 
of a black enamel, the basis of which was ferroso -ferric oxide. 
The firing was done at about 800° C. On the fired 
piece the design was traced, then the background was removed 
to a depth which did not much exceed 1-lOth of a millimeter. 

These potteries had naturally a light pinkish color after 
firing, and the excised decoration in a slightly lustrous mat 




black, over the natural light, mat gi'ound of the pottery, pro- 
duced an extremely harmonious and beautiful effect. 

Artists who might be tempted to revive this fine ceramic 
may prepare a black enamel which will present less difficulties 
than the old enamels, by using magnetite or natural ferroso- 
ferric oxide, which is common in North America as well as in 
all countries. 

This preparation may be made as follows: 

Magnetite 38 

Manganese oxide 20 

Tin oxide 4 

Flux as below 38 

This is ground in water very fine. 
The flux is made of : 

Flint 50) 

Minium 20( . .^^ , , 

Chalk ^5 /fritted and ground 

Soda carbonate .5 ) 

The amount of flux which I mention (38) will be modified 
according to the temperature at which the piece is fired, it 
must be regulated so as to produce a mat glaze, covering the 
surface well even if applied very thin. 




Recent process. Westtrn j\.- 
XVII Century. Painting \vi 
poUtan Museum of Art. Ae 



York, gift of W 



so-called Rhodian). XVI to 
tin enamel. In the ^Ictro- 
B. Osgood Field. 



No. 2i. Ricenl process. Chinese blue and white porcelain va.s.i with metal 
moimts. K'ang Hsi period, 1662-1722, Painting with color.s under the 
glaze. In the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. 

An artist having a true feeling for color, may with this 
excised decoration use polychrome effects, provided that the 
various colors harmonize together, and that too contrasty 
colors, which are unfortunately used by many modern cer- 
amists, be avoided. 

Besides the black glaze which I have just described, I 
wish to mention another ferruginous product giving very 
interesting black, auburn and reddish brown tones. It is a 
product which has not yet been used for this, so far as I know, 



nilRAMIC STUDIO 



99 




FISH STUDIES— EDNA MANN SHOVER 



100 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




No. 22. Modern application of primitive process. Eookwood pottery vase, by Lenore 
Asbury. Painting with slip under ttie glaze. " 

I mean the scoriae constituting the refuse left by the reduc- 
tion of iron ores. There are two kinds of these scoriae: 

1 — Those coming from the modern blast furnaces. 

2 — Those coming from the reduction of iron ores in the 
Catalan furnace. 

The former cannot be used when they are completely 
vitrified in the shape of a translucent glass. One must select 
those which look like lava or metal, and which are also quite 
common. 

The other kind of scoriae, those from the Catalan furnace 
are very seldom vitrified and are consequently very good for 
our purpose. 



These scoriae are nothing but a silicate of iron, often 
calcareous or aluminous, according to the nature of the iron ore 
treated. 

This product is ground very fine, washed several times, 
and used as a glaze. It is applied very thin and if the firing 
is stopped at the time when the vitrification begins, one ob- 
tains a mat glaze, the tones of which, on the same piece, will 
vary according to the atmospheric modifications which occur 
in the kiln in the course of firing. 

The point of fusion of this glaze will vary according to 
the composition of the scoria, from 900° C. to 1200° C. 

It will then have to be regulated as follows: selecting a 
lot of scoriae weighing from 10 to 20 pounds (a very small 
quantity, but we should not forget that we are talking art 
ceramics, not industrial work), the mass will be ground as fine 
as vitrifiable porcelain colors (screen 250). Then it will be 
tested at the point of firing which the artist general uses. If 
it is found that the glaze is too hard, it will be softened with the 
flux which I have described above trying carefully the addi- 
tion of flux in small doses, 3%, 5%, d>%, 10%, etc., as it is 
important to obtain a mat color, not a brilliant one. 

A blacker tone may be obtained by the addition of 5 to 
15% manganese oxide, not forgetting that manganese has a 
tendency to slightly increase the fusibility. 

I think that by showing in a general way, as I have done, 
some processes of decoration to which we owe remarkable 
works of art, the tradition of which has since been lost, artists 
will realize that there is much to do in that line. 

Painted Decoration 

I wish now to say a few words about painted decoration 
such as it was understood by primitive potters, before the 
discovery of vitrifiable matters. 

Everybody knows that the three tones which were used by 
the marvelous artists of old Greece are: black, red and white. 

There is not the slightest doubt that Greek ceramics were 
the development of the much older art of the potters of the 
Aegean sea, who themselves had only perfected the still older 
processes from Eygpt and Asia. The palette used by the Aegean 
potters was more complex than that of the Greeks. Besides 
the black, red and white, it contained brown, orange and 
violet. All these colors, except black, were constituted of 
clays and ochres which wei-e applied on the raw body and 
which were burnt like ordinary colors. 

And it is extremely interesting to compare the colors used 
by the Aegean potters with those used in South America, 




No. 23 Primitive Process. Precolombian pottery from Nazca (Peru). Painting with clays or ocbrcs. 
From the Berthon collection, Paris. 



nERAMIC STUDIO 



fOI 




THORN VINE— ALICE W. DONALDSON 



(Treatment by Kathryn E. Cherry) 



TRACE design in then outline with Grey for Flesh and 
fire. Then oil the background with the Dusting Medium 
and dust it in with Deep Ivory, then clean out the flowers 
and leaves carefully, paint flowers with Apple Green and Vio- 
let which will make a delicate gi'ey if applied very thin, then 



paint light leaves with Apple Green and dark leaves with 
Brown Green and Shading Green. The centers of flowers are 
Albert Yellow, the thorns are Blood Red with a touch of Ruby. 
Third fire — Paint stems with Auburn Brown, shade 
flowers with Yellow Brown and Brown Green. 



102 



MIRAMIC STUDIO 




No. 24. Primiiivc Process. Precolombian pottery from Niveria (Peru). Painting 
with ocliros or clay. From tlie Bertlion collection, Paris. 

before the conquest. We find there the same thought, born 
among people of very different races, but, who, although they 
had neither the same customs, nor the same arts, nor the same 
means of execution, seem to have met in the same conception 
of the beautiful. 

Greek potters executed their admirable paintings with 
colors which in fact were vitrifiable, but were left mat with a 
peculiai' lustre which we do not find in our modern glazes and 
enamels. These colors, thus used, were much more effective 
for paintings than if they had had the facticious brilliancy due 
to a complete vitrification. However, Greeks knew the real 
enamels, the preparation of which they had found in Egypt, 
but it seems that they did not consider them as a necessary ad- 
dition to a craft which is in itself a powerful expression of 
artistic beauty. 

In South America potters do not seem to have found natural 
products capable of vitrification at the low temperature at 
which they burnt the ware. But they found colored clays, 
which, when finely ground and applied on raw, left on the 
surface of the pottery, after firing, a very resistant covering, 
capable of acquiring by rubbing a beautiful lustre resembling 




No. 2.5. Primitive process. Precolombian pottery from Nazca (Poni). 
Painting with clays or ochres. From the Berthon collection, Paris. 

exactly Greek colors. And thus South Americans adopted a 
decorative technique, which is so similar to that of the Greeks, 
that it was undoubtedly conceived in the same spirit. Greeks 
have reproduced on their vases scenes of every day life and 
mythological scenes. South Americans have mostly repro- 
duced symbols and allegorical figures, the meaning of which 
often escapes us. 

These curious paintings which reveal to us customs of far 
away times, should not serve as a model for our modern ceramic 
decoration. Nearly all attempts which have been made to 
revive some of the master pieces of the old arts, have failed, 
because artists have tried to copy them instead of being w- 
spired by them. 

Painting with clays, ochres, manganeses, may be used 
to-day, we will certainly owe many beautiful works to these 
old processes, when artists become familiar with this very 
special decoration. Many clayey, ochreous and manganifer- 
ous products are available, if one knows how to use them. 










No. 20. Priiniiice Process. 



Precolombian pottery from Nazca 
From the Berthon collection, 



(Perm. Paiming uiin clay.-i c 



tVERAMlC STUDIO 



103 




CINERARIA— IDA UPTON PAINE 



(Treatment page 106) 



104 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



Clays give white, yellow, orange, red, reddish brown and 
violet. These variations of tone are due mainly to the differ- 
ent proportions of alumina, iron oxide and lime. Alumina 
gives a lighter tone to iron, a tone called capucine red. Lime 
determines tones varying from orange red to yellow. Certain 
ferruginous clays give a violet tone due to a special oxidation 
of the iron. 

Ochres giving a violet tone are quite common, but they 
produce mainly beautiful reddish browns. 

Manganese oxides which are commonly found in nature in 
the form of pyrolusite and acerdese, are mixed with white clays 
to give light greys and with ferruginous clays or ochres to 
give tones varying from dark grey to black. 

Manganese oxides are used as they are, but clays and 
ochres must be washed to remove the coarsest parts. This 
washing is of course done by decantation ; only the finest parti- 
cles which are in suspension are kept, and when deposited 
and dried out, they are ground either by themselves, or with 
whatever ingredients must be added to them to constitute a 
certain color. 



These colors, which, with very few exceptions, are clayey, 
must be applied on raw and in an extremely thin coat. They 
must be applied perfectly even. No better examples can be 
given than the painted potteries from Peru, Bolivia and Mexico, 
from the period preceding the conquest, numerous specimens of 
which are found in all Museums of Archeology and Ethno- 
graphy. 

As I have said before, artists will find in these old ceramics 
inexhaustible materials for decorative technique, and I am 
pleased to speak of this here because I understand that the 
teaching of ceramics in the United States includes the study of 
some processes of shape making which were practiced in the 
old time.* American teachers, better inspired in this than 
those of Europe, have realized the importance of initiating a 
student into the evolution of technical processes since the 
early times. 

I then hope that this modest contribution to the study of 
the primitive decorative technique, will be well received. 



*Biiilt pottery. 




BREAKFAST SET— ALBERT W. HECKMAN 



HERAMIC STUDIO 



105 






BREAKFAST SET— ALBERT W. HECKMAN 



This may be done in one color or in two colors as the values in the black and white suggest. An old blue with a grey green or a 

yellow brown and a blue may be used. If done in one color, two parts Banding Blue, one part Copenhagen Blue and 

one part Copenhagen Grey makes a good blue. Oil in the whole design and dust on the color. Fire heavily. 



106 



tlEKAMlC STUDIO 





TEA CADDY, NASTURTIUM— HANNAH B. OVERBECK 

CUPS AND SAUCERS (Page 115) 

Kathryn E. Cherry 
No. 5 — Derby Cup, "Haviland" 

Trace the design most carefully then oil all of the greenish 
blue places and dust with Water Green No. 2, then oil the violet 
places and dust with Mode. Clean the dusting well, then put 
in the gold, use Green Gold. 

Second Fire — Touch up all the uneven places then go over 
the gold again. 

No. 6 — Green Cup and Saucer 

Trace the design in, then oil the dark green places and dust 
with Water Lily Green, then oil the darker brown places and 
dust with Coffee Brown. The bands are dusted with Bright 
Green, the oil must be padded very thin for the Bright Green, 
so it will not be too bright, then oil the flower and dust with 
Yellow for Dusting. 

Second Fire — Touch up all the uneven places and fire. 

Third Fire — Oil the entire cup and dust with Green for 
Glaze. This must be padded very dry so it will be a very 
delicate cream. 

PITCHER, PLATES AND TEA-POT IN NASTURTIUMS 
(Pages 108, 109, HO) 

Hannah B. Overbed- 

OIL the bands back of the flowers and dust with equal parts 
Ivory Glaze and Bright Green. Leaves, stems and 
bands in Green Gold. Flowers, 2 parts Albert Yellow, | part 
Yellow Brown, 3 parts Ivory Glaze. 



CINERARIA (Page 103) 

Ida L'pion Paine 
"PLOWERS are painted with Deep Blue Green and Violet 
-T with touches of Mauve. The centers are Yellow and 
Yellow Brown. Leaves are Yellow Green, Bronze Green and 
Shading Green; the stems are Violet and Bronze Green. 

Second Firing — Paint backgi'ound with Violet and Copen- 
hagen Blue, and touches of Yellow. Touch up flowers with 
same colors used in first fire, going over the shadows, leaving 
the lights clear. 

CALIFORNIA POPPIES (Page III) 

Helena E. Hanscom 

OUTLINE design with Grey for Flesh. Oil flowers and dust 
with 2 Pearl Grey, 1 Ivory Glaze and 1 Albert Yellow. 
Oil stems and leaves and dust with Florentine Green or 3 Apple 
Green 1-2 Shading Green, 2 Pearl Grey. 

Second Firing — Oil over the entire surface and pad the oil 
until it is tacky, then let it stand about two hours and dust with 
Pearl Grey and a little Yellow, then clean the color from the 
flowers and paint the dark touches on the flowers with Yellow 
Brown. 




BOWL, NASTURTIUM— HANNAH B. OVERBECK 




NASTURTIUM DESIGN, TEA CADDY, BOWL AND TRAY 
(Pages 106, 107) 

Hannah B. Overbeck 

FLOWERS may be oiled and dusted with 2 parts Pearl Grey, 
1 part Ivory Glaze, f part Yellow Brown. Leaves: 3 
parts Pearl Grey, 1 part Apple Green. Stems and bands in 
White Gold. 



MERAMIC STUDIO 



107 



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108 



nilRAMIC STUDIO 



JAPANESE LANTERN PLANT— (Page 97) 

Treatment by Kathnjn E. Cherry 
P>AINT leaves with Yellow Green and Brown Green, touches 
A of Shading Green. The stems are Brown Green and Violet. 
The lanterns are Yellow for Painting and Apple Green. Use 



the Yellow Green for shading and veining the lanterns. 
The stems are Shading Green and a little Black. 

Second firing — Use same colors for retouching used in 
first firing. The background is Violet, Shading Green, Yel- 
low for Painting and Grey for Flesh. 





1 1! Ill 






PLATES AND TEA POT, NASTURTIUM— HANNAH B. OVERBECK (Treatment page 106) 



nilRAMIC STUDIO 




\, 



\ 



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X 



109 



X 







\ 






PLATE BORDERS, NASTURTIUM MOTIF— HANNAH B. OVERBECK (Treatment page 106) 



no 



HEKAMIC STUDIO 




PITCHER, NASTURTIUMS- HANNAH B. OVERBECK 



(Treatment page 106) 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



in 




CALIFORNIA POPPIES— HELENA E. HANSCOM 



(Treatment page 106) 



112 



REIKAMIC STUDIO 




STUDY AND DESIGN FOR GROUND CHERRIES— HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST 



T TNIT for stein or bowl. The same general color scheme 
^ as for plate should be followed and the unit could be 
connected by a band or panels of the warm tone suggested as 
background for panel (Warm Grey or mixture of Neutral Yel- 
low and Violet of Iron and Olive Green) The whole to be 
outlined with Gold or Black as preferred. 

For panel or small bowl— Tint all over with a soft, 
warm tone made by combining Neutral Yellow (Satsuma) and 



Violet of Iron, with perhaps a touch of Olive Green. Clean 
out the background color for the cherries as they are lighter 
and cooler in tone. After firing lay the leaves and stems with 
soft Grey Green using different values for variety but keeping 
the color flat. Lay the cherries with Neutral Yellow or 
Dresden Yellow Ochre to which a touch of Black has been 
added. The outlines should be gone over at the last firing to 
strengthen and perfect them. 










PEACH BORDER MOTIF— ABBOTT McCLURE 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

TRACE design in carefully with India ink, then 
oil and dust fruit with Deep Ivory. The 
leaves are oiled then dusted with Florentine Green. 
The pointed motif which comes in between fruit is 
oiled and dusted in with Dove Grey. The bands 
are Dove Grey and the marking in bands are 
Florentine Green. 



PHISALIS— HARRIETTE B. BURT (Supplement) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

FOR the red rods use Albert Yellow, Yellow Brown, Blood 
Red and Yellow Red. Outline is Blood Red and a 
little Ruby. For the green pods use Lemon Yellow, Yellow 
Brown, Moss Green and Shading Green and a little Dark Brown 
and the same for the leaves and stems. For the violet tones 
use a little Violet No. 2. Background is Pearl Grey and a 
little Yellow Brown. 

Water Color Treatment — Harriette B. Burt 
The first wash is of Chrome Orange on the flower 
form, then Vermillion and Alyzarine Crimson, with Purple 
for the shadows; and Transparent Green (light) was used for 
the leaves and stems, with washes of Raw Sienna on some parts 
and Blue and Green combined on others. I also used a Warm 
Purple for the under shadowed part of leaves. 










BORDER OF BASKETS— ABBOTT McCLURE 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

OUTLINE design carefully. The darkest spaces are 
oiled, then dusted with Bright Green. The medium 
greys ai'e oiled then dusted with Mode. The small black 
dots and lines are Green Gold. 




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RERAMIC STUDIO 



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114 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




PUNCH BOWL— CELIA C. POPE 



OUTLINE the fruit with black. Paint the bands and geo- 
metric designs with Gold. 
Second Firing — Mix a white enamel, using 4 parts Relief 
White, 1 part Hard White enamel and grind it thoroughly. 
Take enough of this to paint the medium sized pieces of fruit 
and mix it with a little Albert Yellow. For the seeds in the 
fruit add a little Yellow Brown to the yellow mixture, and for 
the remainder of the five larger pieces of fruit add a little Yellow 
Red and Yellow Brown to the white mixture. For the smallest 
fruit use quite a little Violet and a Deep Purple. For leaves 
add Apple Green, a little Yellow Green and a touch of Black. 
Retouch Gold in the second fire. 

STUDIO NOTE 

A letter from Miss Frances Blanchard, Des Moines, la., 
tells of an interesting trip which she has just taken through 
Europe for the purpose of study and recreation. The result of 
this trip will be many new ideas for her prospective pupils. 



ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

p. A. M. — Pure silver is more or less coarse grained, difficult to work 
smoothly, looks rough when finished and tarnishes very easily with ugly colors. 
White gold has a fine grain, is easy to work and looks smooth when finished. 
It does not tarnish as readily as silver, and when it does, the colors are irides- 
cent instead of grey or black. When finished it has not as white a color as 
pure silver, but a slight yellowish tinge, which is due to the fact that the white 
gold contains over- .50% of gold. You evidently wanted a whiter effect than 
the white gold gives, so we are sending you a half i^ennyweight of powdered 
silver. Mix this with fat oil, use the palette knife and mix thoroughly, also 
a Uttle turpentine as you would a dry color, and try it on a piece of china to 
see if it gives the result you want. Liquid Bright Silver is like Liquid Bright 
Gold and is used in the same way. The best way to find out things is to make 
experiments on old or broken pieces of china and firing, then you will know 
exactly. 

J. E. M. — We do not know the rea.son for the stilts leaving marks ou the 
plates. A great many people stack their plates as you say you do and do 
not have any trouble. Possibly you are using a make of china that is not 
as hard as the usual kind, or if you have a heavy tint where the stilts rest they 
are apt to mark it. 



REKAMIC STUDIO 



ns 




116 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




TEA TILE— CLARA L. CONNOR 



(Treatment by Jessie M. Bard) 



OUTLINE with Grey for Flesh and a Httle Blood Red. 
Second Fire — Oil the four large spaces in the center, 
the three large flower spaces at the side and the outer band and 
dust with two parts Banding Blue, two parts Copenhagen 



Flesh, one part Yellow Brown and a little Ruby. Oil the re- 
mainder of the design and dust with four parts Pearl Grey, one 
part Moss Green. Third Fire — Oil over entire surface and 
dust with one part Grey Yellow, one part Yellow Brown, five 



Blue, one part Copenhagen Grey. Oil the darker leaf space parts Ivory Glaze, 
and dust with two parts Pearl Grey, one-half part Grey for 



^^ III -^^^^f 





BOWL WITH FLORAL MOTIF— CLARA L. CONNOR 

The leaves and bands are Green Gold, the flower is outlined in Black, then fired. Second fire — Fill in the flower with Pink 
enamel. The center is Yellow enamel, then paint lower half of bowl with Apple Green and just a little 

Violet. This must be applied very light. 




r. B. AiJLicn'd 



WELL KNOWN 



Select Powder Colors for China 

The beat Qnalltr. Finely Groand. BRUSHES and MEDIUM For Sale by Leadine 

Art Stores. WATER COLOR STUDIES TO KENT. Mail Orders Promptly FiUed 

Send for Price List. 1104 AUDITORIUM TOWER, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS. 



Good China and Art Material Count 



in your work. You'll make 
no mistake in buying of us. 
"Arto" Self-Centering 
Banding Wheels are better 
than ever — Make banding 
so easy. Let us send you 
lists. 



EVERYTHING FOR ARTISTS AND CHINA PAINTERS 
A. H. ABBOTT & CO., 127 North Wabash Avenue, Chicago 

SELLING AGENTS FOR BBTELATION KILNS OUTStDB COOK CO.. ILL 




JUST PUBLISHED 



LEATHER WORK 

By ADELAIDE MICKEL 

Department of Manual Arts, Bradley Polytechnical Institute, Peoria, Illinois 

A COMPLETE MANUAL ON ART LEATHER WORK 



V^1!W?^ 




^^-^_^ 



'T'HE MOST COMPLETE AND SUGGESTIVE BOOK pubUshed on lealhei-work, 
-*■ It is intended to be of practical assistance in acquiring the technique of the 
rarious Idnds of leathcr-Tvork. It describes the tools, processes and materials ased 
in workini! leather and gires detailed descriptions of (he steps to be followed in 
making the articles shown in the many illustrations. 

The book is well illustrated with half-tones and line drawings, showing pholo- 

graphs of many finished articles and full-page working drawings of twenty useful and 
eautiful articles suitable for home and class work. Size 7"xl0" — S3 pages, Bound 
In leather brown Coruscan paper. 

PRICE, POSTPAID, 76 CENTS, 

INEXPENSIVE BASKETRY 

By WILLIAM S. MARTIN, San Jose, California High School. 

npHIS book presents in detail the processes of coiled basket construction. It gives 
-L a complete treatment of the necessary tools and processes and the preparation of 
raw materials. It is unique among books on basketry as it shows by a series of excel- 
lent photographs every step in the construction of a coiled basket. The illustrations 
"really Ulustrate" and show the hand full-size in the different positions assumed in 
mailing a complete basket. In addition it contains a bibliography of books and mag- 
azine articles treating of basketry. 

PRICE, POSTPAID, 25 CENTS. 

THE MANUAL ARTS PRESS, 

PEORIA, (1913 Catalog Free on Request.) ILLINOIS. 



Dresden 




Trade 'W^Matk 

MiiUer&Heimig 

Dresden. 



A Fraud Upon the Public 

Unscrupulous persons have the right to palm oflF a 
worthless product as OLD CHINESE PINK ENAMEL, 
but they hare no right to call it 

Dorothea Warren O'Hara's 
"Old Chinese Pink Enamel" 

or to brand it as such, bottled under another name, or to 
sell this inferior product in bulk, using the above name. 

Such people are guilty of a fraud upon the public and 

We Propose to Invoke the Law 

to aid our patrons 

Anyone who will furnish us with proof that they have 
had colors or enamels offered them as Dorothea War- 
ren's or Dorothea Warren O'Hara's— other than those 
made and bottled by us — will not only be properly re- 
warded, but will be helping to establish justice and 
dispose of dishonesty and imposition. We will be 
pleased to furnish full details as to our reason for 
printing this card. 

WARREN-O'HARA COLOR COMPANY 

132 East 19th Street, New York 



Border Patterns Surface Patterns 
Applied Designs 

A SET OF TEN CARDS 

giving some entirely new motifs, and some fresh 
applications of familiar motifs, useful in your daily work 

You should see these, and see them at once 
Send us Fifty Cents and ask for 

Set No. 5 School Arts Drawing Cards 

SCHOOL ARTS PUBLISHING CO. 

Dept. M. BOSTON, U. S. A. 



IF YOU WISH TO 

BEGIN YOUR SUBSCRIPTION 

with the 

May 1913 Number 

of KERAMIC STUDIO (the first of the 15th vol.) we have a 
few back numbers to date, but the quantity is limited 

DON'T HOLD YOUR ORDER TOO LOiNG 

Bound copies of Vol. 14 now on hand, $5.50 express paid 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO. 
SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



®©i>(P#©^>^@^#(§#<i>#^^K^^)(i)@<§©<i)@(gKi)(i)f)(^(i)^@ 







Wild Woods Desigo 

conipeiition 

CLOSES OCTOBER 10, 1913 

"2 N tlic editorial oi jtiiie^ l^JiJ, we advised you to go to the woods for inspiration with a view 
r to taking part in the fall competition for conventionalisations of wild flowers. This compe- 
tition will close October J 0th. Make your carefttl drawing of f!owcr» leaf and stem, then 
make conventionalised units of flower and leaf, a page of these, then a page of scmi-con- 
ventionalised designs, i, e., small flower panels connected with conventional or geometrical 
design or small semi-conventional flower arrangements of borders^ finally a page of conv&itional 
designs applied to straight and curved edges, all from the same flower. 



$5.00 

$5.00 
$10.00 



PRIZES 

For the greatest number of flowers studied in this way in black and 
white. (The taking of this pri^e will not present the taking of other prizeis or 
selling the studies separately,) 



For the best study of a flower carried out according to directions, 
in black and white. 



For the best complete study and design in color applied to any 
shape 



GOOD DESIGNS WHICH HAVE NOT BEEN AWARDED PRIZES WILL BE 
CONSIDERED FOR PURCHASE 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO. 

SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



# 



I 



@ 









t^E^ELaiR nrti 



F^l R-.E1- A^UJ V^E-. 






CONTRIBUTORS 




JESSIE M. BARD 
ALICE W. DONALDSON 
JETTAEHLERS 
IDA C FAILING 
FLORENCE A. HUNTINGTON 
KATHERINE W. LINDSAY 
EULA L. McHENRY 
PUPILS OF MABEL E. NORTHROP 
MARY CHURCHILL RIPLEY 
EDITH ALMA ROSS 
ALICE SEYMOUR 
ALICE B. SHARRARD 
lONE WHEELER 

K, E. CHERRY'S CLASS, FOUR WINDS 
POTTERY SUMMER SCHOOL 




A nOIITHLY HflGflZIME FOR THE! f=^TTER AND DECORATOR- 



The entire contents of thisMagazine are covered by the general copyright, and the articles must not be refM-inted without special permission 



CONTENTS OF OCTOBER, J913 



Editorial Notes 

Chicago Ceramic Art Association 

Conventional Fig Design for Fruit Bowl 

Blossom Panel 

Modern Chinese and Japanese Decoration 

Acorns 

Designs for Nursery Sets 

Scrap Plate 

Plate, Conventional Rose 

Halloween Place Cards 

Designs by K. E. Cherry's Class, Four Winds Pottery 
Summer School 

Texas Fall Flowers (S^j^plement) 

Vase — Moccasin Flower 

Breakfast Set 

Answers to Correspondents 



lone Wheeler 

Eula L. McHenry 

Alice Seymour 

Mary Churchill Ripley 

Edith Alma Ross 

Pupils of Mabel E. Northrop 

Katherine W. Lindsay 

Ida C. Failing 

Alice B. Sharrard 



Alice W. Donaldson 
Florence A. Huntington 
Jetta Ehlers 



Page 
117 

n? 

US 
U9 
120 
121 

J 22- I 25 
126 
126 
127 

J2&-I37 
136 
137 
138 
138 



t6 



THE OLD RELIABLE ^Em FITCH KILNS 



"dk 




The thousands of these Kilns in use testify to 
their Good Qualities 



THE ORiGINAL PORTABLE KILN 



INEXPENSIVE TO BUY 
COST LITTLE TO OPERATE 




The only fuels which give perfect results in 
Glaze and Color Tone 

No. 2 SiM f 4 z f 2 In J30.00 ) / Na. I Site fO x 12 ia. MSM 

No. 3 Sbe t6 X 19 In..- 40.00 G« Klin 2 sixes ^^^^^^^ ^ ^ ^^^ No. 2 Si^ J6 x J2 te. ^.00 

J No, 3 Size (6 x 15 la. 2i.t)0 

WRITE FOR DISCOUNTS. \No.4 SbeI8x26lfl. 66.60 

STEARNS, FITCH & CO., SPRINGFIELD, OHIO 



sf 



Vol. XV. No. 6. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



October I9I3 




E are showing this month the cer- 
amic work of students of the .Four 
Winds Pottery Summer School. Some 
of the students' finished pieces were 
missed because photographs were 
not taken in time. But the showing 
is very good none the less. There 
were seventy students this year, of 
which forty-two took ceramic dec- 
oration and design and hand built 
pottery; the balance of the students were occupied with out- 
door sketches, basketry, leather, jewelry, frame making and 
gilding and carpentry. Next month we will show some of 
the work of the class in design, which, while not so large as 
the ceramic class, executed some exceedingly interesting 
problems. The soft tones of the new dusting colors of Mrs. 
Cherry were used almost exclusively, so popular did they 
become. There was a quantity of acid etching done and 
much enamel and fine outlining in gold and color. 

Altogether the Four Winds School had a veiy successful 
and jolly year. The students were entertained by several 
of the neighboring families. There was a chop roast at Stolps 
Gully at which some remarkably clever compositions by 
Miss Nell Garner Prince and Mrs. Sidney Morse were read 
and sung. The school prophecy by Mrs. Morse was highly 
acclaimed and the chorus to the school song read by Miss 
Prince was sung with gi^eat gusto by the students. We only 
hope that the long and much talked of Doi-mitory will grow. 
The season wound up with charades, recitations and songs 
by the students and teachers, the porch of Four Winds 
cottage being used as a stage and the lawn as auditorium. 
The school song was distributed as a souvenir. Photo- 
graphs and postals of the school, the pottery, teachers 
and students were exceedingly in demand. We will repro- 
duce a few in the next issue with the design class work as we 
have not roorh this time. Readers will pardon so much space 
given to the school since the Editor is so personallj;^ interested. 
Early readers of Keramic Studio will remember that an Ameri- 
can school of ceramics has always been a cherished plan with 
her and it seems now to be materiahzing rapidly. 

We wish to remind our readers of the wild woods design 
competition of which they will find details on the back of the 
cover. There is only a short time left as the competition 
closes October 10th. We hope you will send us this year 
some really fine original work and design. 

We quote below a letter addressed to the members of 
the Keramic Society of Greater New York by the President. 
It shows the effort being made by the Keramic workers to 
advance with the times in the matter of design. 

"Dear Madam: — The feature of the work of the Keramic 
Society during the coming season is the weekly class in design 
under Prof. Grace Cornell. It has been ai-i'anged that this 
will meet Wednesdays from 1 to 4 in the lecture room of the 
Metropolitan Museum of Art, Fifth Avenue and 82d Street. 
The class is open to all members of the Society in good stand- 
ing who duly register and are regular in attendance. Those 



newly joining the Society will pay a fee of $10, which will 
apply to their membership. After the period of registration 
of members of the Society, applicants who are not members 
will be admitted up to the capacity of the class. Fee, $10. 
The first lesson is on October 8th. They will continue until 
May, 1914. Pupils will pay for their own material, which, 
for uniforaiity and economy, will be supplied them by the 
Society. In this way it is planned to make the cost relatively 
small. 

"By way of organization, the Committee has adopted 
the following regulations: 

"1. Registration exclusively for members, up to Sep- 
tember 20th. 

"2. On September 20th, applications of non-members 
will be registered in the order received. They must be ac- 
companied by the fee. 

"3. Thereafter, appHcations will be registered in the 
order received up to the capacity. 

"From the above, it will be seen that to assure admis- 
sion members should register before Sept. 20th and that 
non-members should also file their applications at an early 
date, as they will be considered in the order received. A 
blank form for registration will be sent on request. 

"Names of prospective pupils known to you should be 
sent to the Committee who will forward notices and blanks. 

"It seems unnecessary to announce that in the above 
arrangements an opportunity is afforded keramic workers 
such as they have never before had and of which it is to their 
interest to take advantage. The work is progressive and 
pupils should plan to begin with the first lesson and continue 
regularly. The facilities afforded through the use of the 
Museum will greatly aid Prof. Cornell in presenting the sub- 
ject to the class." 

It is uncertain whether non-resident members will be 
given an opportunity to participate in the work by mail les- 
sons, but those interested will do well to communicate with 
the Committee so they will be notified if such arrangements 
be completed. 

CHICAGO CERAMIC ART ASSOCIATION 

Io?ie Wheeler. 

The Twenty-first Annual Exhibition of the Chicago Cer- 
amic Art Association will be held from Oct. 7th to Oct. 31st 
in connection with the Twelth Annual Exhibition of Arts 
and Crafts at the Chicago Art Institute. In addition to the 
prizes annually offered by Messrs Abbott, Burley and Aulich, 
Mr. Hasburg offers an additional and very generous award. 
Mr. Sleeper offers a money prize for the best use of his gold 
on the lustre piece which receives the award offered by lone 
Wheeler for the best example of work done with Green's 
Lustres. 

The Club has a list of forty-two active members. The 
officers for the year of 1913-1914 are: President, Mrs. Isabelle 
C. Kissinger, Riverside, Illinois; First Vice-President, Miss 
M. Ellen Iglehart, 100 Auditorium Bldg.; Second Vice-Presi- 
dent, Mrs. lone Wheeler, 917 Fine Arts Bldg.; Recording 
Secretary, Mrs. Marguerite J. Rood, 4607 Evans Ave.; Cor- 
responding Secretary, Miss Marie Bohmann, 1161 W. Madi- 
son St.; Treasurer, Mrs. Ralph R. Park, 6108 Kimbark Ave.; 
Custodian, Mrs. Augusta B. McCarn, 918 Fine Ails Bldg.; 
Histroian, Mrs. J. M. Wright, 7334 Stewart Ave. The mem- 



n8 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



bers of the association have studied design for many years 
under the most able instructors obtainable. 

Miss Bessie Bennett of the Art Institute has lead the club 
in the design class for several years. All those who have 
worked for Institute Exhibitions under her dh-ection are greatly 
indebted for her enthusiasm and interest in ceramics. Her 
monthly criticism is a constant encouragement and inspir- 
ation to all the Club members. 

For the past two and a half years, a Flower Study class 
has been conducted by Mr. Arthur Gunther of the Art In- 
stitute, the work being done outside and brought once a month 
for criticism. A detailed study is made of the growth and 
parts of the flower, separate motifs worked out, and this ma- 
terial developed into conventionalized flower designs. This 
direct study from nature develops original work in a degree 
impossible to obtain from the study of historic ornament. 

The Association has been most fortunate in retaining 
Miss Bennett and Mr. Gunther as instructors for the coming 
year. 

The club president was "at home" Mondays in August, 
to the members who could avail themselves of the opportunity 
to take trips in search of wild flowers, this supplied the "social" 
element and left the workers with delightful memories of 
mornings spent gathering flowers on the river banks and of 
afternoons in which they assembled on a large and most hospi- 
table porch, to make drawings from the flowers amid the most 
ideal surroundings. 

STUDIO NOTE 

Miss Amy F. Dalrymple of Boston has added to her 
Studio several interesting subjects in oil and water colors, 
representative of the picturesque "North Shore" of Massa- 
chusetts. 



PLATE, CONVENTIONAL ROSES (Page 126) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

OUTLINE leaves and geometric figures above and below 
roses and also the wide band between them with Black. 
Outline the roses with Gold. Paint the leaves and the geo- 
metric spaces with Gold also the fine line joining the roses 
and the outer band at edge. 

Second Fire — Oil the wide band between sections with a 
thin coat of oil and dust with Bright Green. Oil Roses and 
dust with Cameo. Retouch Gold. 




FULL SIZE PANEL, FRUIT BOWL— EULA L. McELHINNY 




CONVENTIONALIZED FIG DESIGN FOR FRUIT BOWL— EULA L. McELHINNY 

To be painted in two shades of gold, figs in Fasburg's white gold, leaves and bands in Hasburg's green gold, Black outline. 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



119 




BLOSSOM PANEL— ALICE SEYMOUR 



(Treatment page 134) 



i20 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




PORCELAIN CUPS BY CHIKUZEN 

MODERN CHINESE AND JAPANESE OVERGLAZE DECO- 
RATION 

Mary Churchill Ripley Weisse 

\ MONG Oriental potters there seems to be evident in- 

-^^ tent to copy that which has been successful in the past, 

and they are handling undecorated glazed porcelain in a way 

that should be most suggestive to ceramic artists everywhere. 

One of the greatest Japanese potters said to me frankly 
that there was "too much new style in America" and that he 
wished that some big American artist would do "big copy." 
Keen appreciation was expressed of those artists in America 
who have followed Oiiental lead in doing successful over- 
glaze work. In answer to repeated questions about the styles 
he would suggest for modern artists to adopt, who were 
obliged to depend for decoration upon porcelains which they 
did not make themselves, the answer was "enamel and gold 
— fine in America — solid colors overglaze, etching in glaze." 

In order to obtain some absolutely modern ideas I set 
out one morning with a great porcelain expert to visit the 
potters of Kyoto. On both sides of the narrow streets were 
curio shops, each one boasting a small show window, which 
served as setting for a few selected gems of the potter's art: 
a bit of a jug made by an ancestor, and a less successful but 
somewhat attractive copy made by the owner of the shop 
in his private kiln which was located in the garden at the 
rear of his house. 

A common ambition seemed to have caused the potters 
to do their best toward reproducing Chinese colors, and beau- 
tiful objects both large and small testified to their skill. No 
one with a thorough knowledge of Chinese pastes and glazes 
could for a moment be deceived by the Japanese wares, but 
no novice could escape being puzzled by certain of the repro- 
ductions. 

It was my personal experience to find the potters all 
anxious to claim their work as their own and in no single case 
was anything offered me that was other than what it was 
said to be. Several times more money was charged for por- 
celain, hot from the. kiln, so to speak, than for pieces made 
by the noted grandfather of the potter. 

Seifu and Chikuzen are conceded to be the master potters 
of Japan to-day and they are more difficult to approach than 
many of the younger men whose reputation is not yet made. 
They received me most courteously and spread out before 
me matchless little saki cups and bottles, closely resembling 
in color the white libation cups of the Fukien Province in China. 
Chikuzen himself selected for me twenty-one little white cups 
which had that morning been drawn from the kiln. On 
each one of them his name was engraved as sole decoration. 

Nothing could be of more superb quality than Chiku- 
zen's white ware, this has been developed by the master 
potter himself and is produced in many shades. Bowls of 
fine quality paste, decorated with raised flowers, were covered 
with a deep cream colored glaze of almost a yellow cast re- 
sembling the opaque white glaze of old Ming pottery, these 
bowls were of translucent porcelain without a blemish. 



A set of teacups of eggshell porcelain were bluish white 
in color and utterly different in every way from the bowls, 
while some exquisite little one company teapots were both 
in paste and glaze suggestive of the wares made for Kang- 
h.si, the first Great Emperor of the last Chinese Dynasty. 

Altogether these reproductions of the Chinese have never 
been asjf successfully made as by Seifu and Chilcuzen and 
neither of these great simple hearted men claimed that the 
work of their hands was other than it really was, twentieth 
century reproduction of beautiful objects made in the past. 
It is generally left to the middle man to offer as genuine an- 
tiques, wares made to-day. These reproductions are ordered 
in large quantities by dealers and though the potters know 
perfectly well that they are sold as antiques, they personally 
seem proud of their success and insist upon being recognized 
as makers of the articles. 

This was demonstrated by Makudza Kozan, 3d, who 
charges to-day more for his copies of antique pottery than for 
specimens made by either his father or his gi'and father. I 
bought several very rare bits of porcelain made by the elder 
Kozan nearly a half century ago for which I paid less than 
for a tea-bowl and a tea-jar made by Kozan's grandson. Each 
of the small porcelain vases made by the elder Kozan was 
marked by him and bore the impress of his own seal, there 
was no attempt to copy a Chinese mark. Many connoisseurs 
have been surprised to find these little glazed pieces so puz- 
zling and difficult to identify as they are strongly suggestive 
of Chinese work. 

I tried to obtain some idea of the materials used in the 
most successful overglaze work being done in Japan to-day 
and was astonished to find that the preparations instead of 
being of old time formulae and of native manufacture were 
generally the same as those used in Europe and America and 
bore the name of some American or European maker. 

A method of mixing India ink or lampblack with the 
colors serves to change their tone somewhat and seemed to 
me an important item of interest. The use of India ink was 
advised by several artists, especially those who favored the 
Chinese process of etching in the glaze. This mode of decor- 
ation long puzzled students of the potter's art and two cen- 
turies ago both in Germany and England, Chinese porcelains 
thus decorated were counted as rare and interesting. Of 
late years this has been frankly spoken of as a lost art and one 
never really understood and therefore it was interesting to 
have it recommended to American artists as one of the methods 
they might adopt with success. Determined to find out all 
that I could about this etched ware, I carried the thought 
from Japan to China and in the original home of porcelains 
discovered that for which I was seeking. 

The whole country beyond Nanking on the Yangtse 
Kiang and in the mountains back of the river in the neighbor- 




Rouge Box decoration incised in the glaze while you wait 



REKAMIC STUDIO 



m 





ACORNS— EDITH ALMA ROSS 



(Treatment page 136) 



122 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



hood of Kingtechin and Lake Loyang is peopled with potters. 
Kilns are everywhere and eveiything that can be formed of 
clay is found in this world famous location. As my intention 
was to secure ideas for present day use I asked, through an 
interpreter, numberless question about method. I was 
finally rewarded by finding etchers who were doing extremely 
good work on glazed porcelains and from them I gleamed a 
few points that will, I trust, prove stimulating to those who 
have never tried this method of decoration. White glazed 
porcelain was first rubbed over with clay so as to take from 
the smoothness of the surface and then with a sharp pointed 
tool the design was cut through the glaze free hand. Frets 
and floral bands served as borders, and medalUons enclosing 
figures and flowers were scattered over the sides of bowls and 
vases. After the etching was finished India ink was rubbed 
into the decorations and the whole object was then wiped off 
and left to stand in the sun awhile. After polishing with a 
rough cloth the result was most attractive. 

Later when I became more familiar with the country I 
found in the streets of the native cities potters sitting before 







FLORENCE A. PETERS 



stands on which was plain white ware. These articles were 
decorated while the customers waited. Historical scenes 
were ordered by the most ordinary buyers, who wished to 
have portraits of Confucius and other celebrities etched on 
the sides of their ten cent teapots and whiskey bottles. I 
selected a rouge box which was decorated for me while I waited. 
I learned that India ink was often used for outlines be- 
tween which colors were spread and fired in a muffle kiln,and 
the gi'eat delicacy thus procured led me to examine some an- 
tiques afterward to find that the confining lines of the color 
work had been cut in the glaze and on some antique pieces 
gold had been applied between engraved lines. I could not 
discover of what the fine point was made, used by the engrav- 
ers, but no cracking of the glaze was ever apparent and ex- 
periments by American artists would, I am sm-e, prove inter- 
esting. 

DESIGNS FOR NURSERY SETS 

Mahd E. Northrop 

THE designs for the nursery sets shown in the illustrations 
are the answers to a problem involving both constructive 
and decorative design. They were worked out, by first year 
pupils, in the free hand drawing department of the Utica Free 
Academy at Utica, N. Y. In the solution of the problem the 
first consideration was, of course, that of form. Examples of 
fine shapes were shown, together with a mass of illustrative 
material, from catalogues of high grade potteries and clippings 
from the Keramic Studio and other sources. Several bowl 
shapes were cut by each pupil. The best one was selected and 
the jug cut to conform to the same general lines of the bowl. 
A circle, of suitable diameter, for the plate, completed the set 
of shapes. All were cut from an ingi^ain yellow paper, resem- 
bling in color and effect of texture, some of the inexpensive 
table pottery. 

The motif of decoration was from nursery rhyme or ani- 
mal form. After the unit was satisfactorily drawn, it was re- 
peated to form a border and as such was traced to both jug 
and bowl forms and adapted to fit the carved border of the 
plate. The designs were rendered in one or more flat tones of 
water colors and in some cases an outline was added. 





"BO-PEEP"— VERA DUNN 



'•EARLY BIRD--REGINA A. WINEBURGH 



DESIGNS FOR NURSERY SETS— UTICA FREE ACADEMY 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



123 





J. G. WATERS 



"LITTLE CHICK"— ELIZABETH LLOYD 





ROSANNA E. WALSH 



"DANNY DUCK" 





FRANCES GRIFFIN -TEDDY BEAR"— MARGUERITE A. STEBER 

DESIGNS FOR NURSERY SETS— UTICA FREE ACADEMY 



124 



tlEKAMIC STUDIO 



^ .•-■ 


- rr c:^ 


-x 


__jg-ra*«a«* 


k»sfijij^"— — ^ 






^ 


^ 


I— :;-:35aPE^c^-a!:?'«^sffia:3 




Sk 



*^ ' 




LITTLE BO-PEEP— HELEN McMULLEN 



"JIM CROW "-EDNA "CURT 








/ 



— J — ;^~ki=>jiu 



"RAG CAT"— LOUISE WEBAR 



"MISS MUFFET"— R. ROBERTS 




<t^)IK^ -| 




"TOM, TOM, THE PIPER'S SON"— KATHRYN LLOYD CORA B. WATERS 

DESIGNS FOR NURSERY SETS— UTICA FREE ACADEMY 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



125 




FLORENCE A. JONES 





^, 



^-Tj^ 



r^^^rcr^^ 



/ 





WITCH—LULA BURR 



1^!^^ 




TURKEY^GEO. TAYLOR 



MARTHA PATRICK 





DESIGN FOR BREAD AND MILK SET— FLORA McGREGOR ERMA DABELSTEIN 

DESIGNS FOR NURSERY SETS— UTICA FREE ACADEMY 



126 



RIIRAMIC STUDIO 




SCRAP PLATE— KATHERINE W. LINDSAY 



(Treatment page 135) 




PLATE, CONVENTIONAL ROSE— IDA C. FAILING 



(Treatment page 118) 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



127 





HALLOWE'EN PLACE CARDS 

Alice B. Sharrard 

Mouse and Apple 

PAINT apple in natural tints. Red in darkest tones, shaded 
to Yellow Cadmium and Greenish Grey, by adding a 
bit of Indigo on right side of apple. Have high light white. 
The name is to be written here. The mouse is a purplish grey, 
pink feet and nose, eyes black. Cut a small strip of board, 
attach to back after cutting out the card. This allows it to 
stand up, and makes a very unique and pleasing table decora- 
tion. Outline card in gold. 

Cat and Pumpkin 

CAT is black with bluish white spots. Paint pumpkin with 
Cadmium Yellow shaded with warmer tones of yellow, 
leaving high lights white for writing the name. Cut and mount 
with easel back. Outline with silver. 

Witch Card 

USE Yellow Ochre and Light Red for flesh tones. The 
tall hat is dark bluish green with dark red bands. 
Cape same green, lined with Cadmium Yellow. Waist dark 
red. Skirt left white, shaded with soft greys. Here the name 
is written. Brown, Burnt Sienna and Vandyke. Shoes black, 
hair is grey. Cut out and stand on easel back. 

Caldron Card 

THE pot is greenish grey; Snake Green with yellow spots, 
flowers, Vermillion and Yellow. Bats, grey with yel- 
lowish ground. Outline all in gold, silver or black. 






128 



hbkamic studio 




Miss Ruth Johnson Miss M. C. Carter Miss Myrtle McCoy Miss M. C. Carter Miss Jessie M. Bard 

Mrs. G. W. Brown Mrs. G. "W. Brown Miss Ruth Johnson 




Miss Jean Roberts Mrs. Van Pelt Miss Nell Garner Prince 

Miss Jessie Jackson 



Mrs. Van Pelt 
Miss Halt 




Mrs. Hallie Smith 

K. E. CHERRY'S CERAMIC CLASS, FOUR WINDS POTTERY SUMMER SCHOOL 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



129 




Miss Nealley 




Mrs. Halite Smith 




Miss Florence Maley Miss Hall 

Miss Jessie Jackson 



Mrs. F. M. Gobright 



Miss Florence Maley 
Miss Mattie Hursey Miss Myrtle McCoy 

K. E. CHERRY'S CERAMIC CLASS, FOUR WINDS POTTERY SUMMER SCHOOL 



130 



ki:ramic studio 




Mrs. E. S. Beard 




Mrs. S. D. McLaud 




Miss Jessie M. Bard 



K. E. CHERRY'S CERAMIC CLASS, FOUR WINDS POTTERY SUMMER SCHOOL 



nilRAMIC STUDIO 



I3t 




Mrs. E. B. Fttch 




Miss J. Jackson 




Mrs. S. D. McLaod 

K. E. CHERRY'S CERAMIC CLASS, FOUR WINDS POTTERY SUMMER SCHOOL 



132 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




Mrs. S. D. McLaud 




Mrs. E. S. Beard 

K. E. CHERRY'S CERAMIC CLASS, FOUR WINDS POTTERY SUMMER SCHOOL 



REKAMIC STUDIO 



133 




Mrs. Ellen VanPelt Mrs. J. P. Joyce Mrs. F. M. Gobright Miss Nell Garner Prince 

Mrs. E. S. Beard Miss Jean Roberts Mrs. E. S. Beard 




Mrs. K. E. Cherry Mrs. K. E. Cherry Miss Nell Garner Prince Mrs. Sidney Morse Mrs. K. E. Cherry 

K. E. CHERRY'S CERAMIC CLASS, FOUR WINDS POTTERY SUMMER SCHOOL 



134 



nilRAMIC STUDIO 



BLOSSOM PANEL (Page 119) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

LIGHTEST blossoms are left white using a very thin wash 
of Rose for the shadows and use the Rose a little heav- 
ier for the darker blossoms. Centers of blossoms are Yellow 
shaded with Yellow Brown. Stamens are Yellow Brown 
and a little Dark Brown. Branches are a thin'^wash of Grey 
for Flesh and a little Blood Red for the lights and used a little 
heavier for the darker tone. Background beginning at upper 
left hand corner is Grey and a little Violet shaded to a blue 



tone in center using Deep Blue Green and a little Sea Green 
and toned to a dark green in right hand corner using Shading 
Green with touches of the blue. The colors all are shaded 
to a very light tone at the bottom using the Ivory tones for 
the left hand side and delicate blue with touches of Apple 
Green for the right hand side. Shadows back of blossoms 
are Blood Red and a little Violet. 

Second Fire — Paint a very thin wash of Yellow over the 
white blossoms just enough to take the glaze from the china 
and retouch the rest of the blossoms wherever it is needed 
with the same colors as in first fire. 




Mrs. M. Sherry Hall 

Miss Flood 



Miss M. C. Carter 
Miss M. C. Carter 



Mrs. M. M. Hagadorn 
Miss M. C. Carter 




Miss Nell Garner Prince Miss B. Baagher Miss Nell Garner Prince Mrs. Hopton 

K. E. CHERRY'S CERAMIC CLASS, FOUR WINDS POTTERY SUMMER SCHOOL 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



f35 



SCRAP PLATE (Page 126) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

OIL the darkest tone and dust with Dark Blue for Dust- 
ing; clean edges carefully and oil all the darker grey- 
tones and dust with Water Lily Green and just a little Bright 
Green. Oil the lightest tone in birds except the space aroung 
the eye and dust with 3 parts Deep Ivory and 1 part Albert 



Yellow. The smallest space in background figures and the 
claws of the bird are oiled and dusted with 2 Pearl Grey, 1 
Grey for Flesh, 2 Yellow Brown. 

Second Fire — Oil light background space back of birds, 
and the center of plate and dust with 3 Ivory Glaze and 1 
Yellow Brown. Oil all the grey background in border and 
dust with 1 Violet No. 2 and 4 Pearl Grey. 




Mrs. F. M. Gobright 





Miss Myrtle McCoy Miss Nell Garner Prince Miss Nell Garner Prince Miss Jessie Jackson Miss Leia Hursey 

K. E. CHERRY'S CERAMIC CLASS, FOUR WINDS POTTERY SUMMER SCHOOL 



136 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



ACORNS (Page 121) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

PAINT the cap of the acorns with Albert Yellow and a 
little Yellow Brown for the lights and shade with 
Dark Brown and a little Blood Red and Dark Brown and a 
touch of Black for the darkest touches. Stems same as cap 
using very little of the Blood Red. The center of acorns 
or the nut is Moss Green and a little Yellow for the lights 
and add Brown Green and Shading Green for the darker part. 
Leaves are Apple Green and a little Grey For Flesh for the 
lights and a little Brown Green and Blood Red added for the 
darker tone. Under part of leaf is Albert Yellow and a little 



Brown Green or Grey for Flesh added for the darker tone. 
Background is Yellow at the top with Apple Green added at 
the bottom and a little Violet in the shadows. 

TEXAS FALL FLOWERS (Supplement) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

OUTLINE design with outlining black, then fire. Paint 
ox-eyed daisies with Albert Yellow and Yellow Brown, 
the centers with Auburn Brown and Black. Wild larkspur is 
painted in with Banding Blue and Copenhagen Blue, the white 
asters are Yellow for Painting and Yellow BrowTi, the greens 




Mrs. A. B. Smith 




Mrs. J. P. Joyce Mrs. J. P. Joyce Mrs. J. P. Joyce Mrs. M. Hagadorn Mrs. J. P. Joyce Mrs. M. Hagadorn 

K. E. CHERRY'S CERAMIC CLASS, FOUR WINDS POTTERY SUMMER SCHOOL 











TEXAS FALL F LO WE RS— A. W. do N AUDSO N 



OCTOBER 1913 

SUPPLEM ENT TO 

KERAMIC STU DIO 



KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



137 



are Moss Green and Brown Green. The background is Co- 
penhagen Blue and Warm Grey. For the third fire touch in 
the shadow in flowers with same coloi-s used in second fire. 
Wash 'a thin wash of Mauve on the white asters. 
WATER COLOR TREATMENT 

Alice W. Donaldson 
Yellow field daisies, with Deep Brown centers. Wild 
larkspur, New Blue, paler in center. White asters, with 
Rose Pink buds. Light Yellow centers. Prairie bells, deli- 
cate pink flowers with Yellow stamens and darker Pink dots 
in center petal. Stems Pmplish Grey. 

VASE, MOCCASIN FLOWER 

Florence A. Huntington 

ETCH the path around the design with acid, leaving the 
design in relief, then tint the background with Yellow 
Brown Lustre, wiping out the design and fire. Do the leaves 
and panels in Green Gold and the flower and sepals, also the 
outline around panel in Roman Gold. 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 
Outline is black, except the one around the plain large 
background space which is gold, the darkest tone is also 
gold. All medium grey tones are in White Gold. The 
light grey tone may be painted in an Ivory tone or a thin coat 
of Yellow Brown Lustre apphed. 





Miss Bertha Baugher 

K. E. CHERRY'S CERAMIC CLASS, FOUR WINDS POTTERY 
SUMMER SCHOOL 



VASE, MOCCASIN FLOWER-FLORENCE A. HUNTINGTON 



138 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

Question — Please tell me what causes liquid bright silver to get grey, 
cloudy streaks in it when a perfectly clean brush was used and the china was 
perfectly clean. There was no other paint on the ^ ase to run and spoil the 
silver. — I. M. M. 

Answer — We do not know the cause of your trouble unless it is because 
the hquid silver was not applied heavy enough. 

Q. — Will you kindly tell me why silver (I use Reusche's) comes out dark, 
also which is best silver to use — and whether one should use liquid silver 
with burnish silver or not? — S. S. 

A. — It is best not to use the liquid silver with the burnish silver. Pos- 
sibly your thinning medium was not cleaned which caused it to turn dark. 
Any of the White Gold which come in boxes the same as the other gold is 
verjr satisfactory. 



Q. — Is it necessary to apply gold for a third fu-e where you work over 
a background? The work I have referred to is on a vase; the handles are 
gold and have had two coats and are O. K., but as the background is not 
strong enough, I would like to go over it again, so did not know whether it 
would be necessary to go over gold also. When you mix enamels, can you 
use fat oil of turpentine to mix the hard white enamel to the proper con- 
sistency?— C. E. C. 

A. — It is not necessary to go over the gold the third time when it was 
satisfactory with a second wash but it is best to do as the gold loses some of 
its brilliancy with the extra fire. Fat oil can be used to mix enamels but 
should be used very sparingly just enough to moisten the enamel slightly 
but not enough to hold it together. Use Lavender oil for thinning. 




if- 







BREAKFAST SET— JETTA EHLERS 



Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 



Oil band and basket and dust with 1 Banding Blue, 1 Aztec Blue and 2 Pearl Grey. Oil the darkest tones and dust with 2 
Yellow Green, 1 Violet No. 2, 2 Pearl Grey, 2 Palma Rosa Salmon, 1-2 Yellow Red, 1 Pearl Blossom, 1 Ivory Glaze. 




r. B. AULicri'd 



WELL KNOWN 



Select Powder Colors for China 

The best Quality. Finely Ground. BRUSHES^and MEDIUM For Sale by Leadlne 

Art Stores. WATER COLOR STUDIES TO RENT. Mail Ordera PrompUy Filled 

Send for Price List. 1104 AUDITORIUM TOWER, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS. 



Everything for Artists and China Painters 

is found with us. Good 
goods, good service, is what 
we try to give. 

"Arto" Self-Centermg 
Banding Wheels are better 
and more popular than ever 
— It makes banding so easy. 
Lists sent on request. 

IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS 

A. H. ABBOTT & CO., 127 North Wabash Avenue, Chicago 

SELLING AGENTS FOB REVELATION KILNS OUTSIDE COOK CO» ILL 




JUST PUBLISHED 



LEATHER WORK 

By ADELAIDE MIGKEL 

Department of Manual Arts, Bradley Polytechnical Institute, Peoria, Illinois 

A COMPI.RTK MANUAL ON ART LEATHER WORK 



THE MOST C^L^^^^^x^ „i,i> i^oGGiiGVIVE BOOK published on leathei-worlt. 
It is intended to be of practical assistance in acquiring the technique of the 
rarions kinds of leather-work. It describes the tools, processes and materials used 
In working leather and gives detailed descriptions of the steps to be followed In 
making the articles shown in the many illustrations. 

The book is well illustrated with half-tones and line drawings, showing photo- 
graphs of many Gnished articles and fall-page working drawings of twenty useful and 
beautiful articles suitable for home and class work. Size T'xlO" — S3 pages. Bound 
in leather brown Ooniscan paper. 

PRICE, POSTPAID, 75 CENTS. 

INEXPENSIVE BASKETRY 

By W^ILLIAM S. MARTIN, San Jose, Califomia Hieh School. 

THIS book presents in detail the processes of coiled basket construction. It gives 
a complete treatment of the necessary tools and processes and the preparation of 
raw materials. It is unique among books on basketry as it shows by a series of excel- 
lent photographs every step in the construction of a coiled basket. The illustrations 
"really illustrate" and show the hand fuU-size in the different positions assumed In 
making a complete basket. In addition it contains a bibliography of books and mag- 
azine articles treating of basketry. 

PRICE, POSTPAID. 25 CENTS. 

THE MANUAL ARTS PRESS, 

PEORIA, (1913 Catalog Free on Request.) ILLINOIS. 



The Sixteen Numbers of "Palette and Bench" from Oct. 
J 908 to Jan. 19 10, inclusive, $3.50 postpaid or botind in Yel- 
low Buckram,, J volume, $5.00. Express prepaid. 

Keramic Studio Pub. Co. 



COOLERS GOLDS. 



ROMAN 
GREEN 



RED 
"WHITE" 



OILS BRUSHES 

Every Material for Decorating China. 

We carry the largest and most complete 
stock of WHITE CHINA in the country. 

China Gilded and Decorated to order. 

Monograms Designed for Artists' own work. 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE. 

Boston China Decorating Works, 

L. COOLEY, 
38 Tennyson Street, BOSTON, MASS. 



FOUR WINDS POTTERY 
SUMMER SCHOOL 

Offers a few left-over pieces of 

SATSUMA 



as follows: 



PRICE LIST OF SATSUMA. 



Bowl 



4 1-4 in. Diam. $ ,60 



Bowl . . . 4 3-4 in. 
Bowl . . . Tin. 
Sq. Plate or Card Tray 7 in. 



Gov. Box 

Gov. Box 

Gov. Box 

Gov. Box 

Sugar and Creamer 

Teapot , 

Vase 

Vase 

Vase 



small 

2 1-2 in. " 

4 in. " 

5 in. " 

3 1-2 in. " 
5 in. " 

5 in. High 

6 1-2 in. " 
Tin. 



.50 
.75 

1.50 
.50 
.70 

1.10 

1.25 
each 1.25 

1.75 
.45 
.65 

1.00 



Express paid on $5.00 worth or more. 

ROBIN EAU POTTERY, 

SYRACUSE, N. Y. 







wim woods Desigo 
compBiiiioii 

CLOSES OCTOBER 10, 1913 

"a N the editorial of June, I9J3, we advised you to go to the woods for inspiration with a view 
r to taking part in the fall competition for conventionalisations of wild flowers. This compe- 
|fli tition will close October lOth. Make your careful cfeawing of flower, leaf and stem, then 
make conventionalised units of flower and leaf/ a page of these, then a page of semi-con- 
ventionalised designs, i, e., small flower panels coimected with conventional or geometrical 
design or small semi-conventional flower arrangements of borders, finally a page of conventional 
designs applied to straight and curved edges, all from the same flower. 



@ 






© 






$5.00 

$5.00 
$10.00 



PRIZES 

For the greatest number of flowers studied in thiis way in black and 
white. (The taking of tliis prize w'dL not present the taking of other prizes or 
selling the studies s^arately,) 



For the best study of a flower carried out according to directions, 
in black and white. 

For the best complete studv and desIt^M in tolor aoolied to any 
shape 



GOOD DESIGNS WHICH HAVE NOT BEEN AWABDhu rKi^ 
CONSIDERED FOR PUROIASE 



KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHINo *.u. 

SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 






(©) 

t 



@ 



I 



I 



@, 



(^ 
(^ 



@ 









h^EL.El.-p T'H EL. F^|R_E_- ^_l_ I \^EI_ 



CONTRIBUTORS 



H. L, BRIDWELL 
KATHRYN E, CHERRY 
SARAH RYEL COMER 
OPHELIA FOLEY 
MRS. ROBERT D. HAIRE 
•ALBERT W. HECKMAN 
MAY B.^HOELSCHER 
A. V, LINGLEY 
KATHERINE W. LINDSEy 
DORRIS D. MILLS 
HANNAH B. OVERBECK 
ELMA S. RITTER 
ALICE B. SHARRARD 
EDNA MANN SHOVER 
T- SLOCOMB 



k^' 



J^nian InstJt^ 



0CT27 19ig 



NOV. MCHXIII Price 40c. Yearly Subscription $4.00 



f\ noMTHLY momt\i m the potter amddecor/mor- 



The entire contents of this Magazine are covered by the general copyright, and the articles must not be reprinted without special permission 

CONTENTS OF NOVEMBER, J9I3 



Editorial Notes ^ 

The|WiId Turkey 

Chop Plate, Tttrkeys 

Trillium 

Conventional Suggestions, Trillium 

Plate Border and Center 

Bowl 

Salt Shaker 

Plate 

Bitter Sweet Berries 

Sugar Tree 

Butternut 

Water Beech 

Red Oak 

White Oak 

Black Walnut 

Cockspur Thorn 

Hop Tree 

Judas Tree, Red Bud 

Fruit Plate 

Dinner Set 

Rabbit Mug 

Cup and Saucer 

Child's Pitcher 

Child's Mug 

Child's Cup 

Fish Platter 

Plate, Conventionalized from Holly Leaf 

Answers to Correspondents 



Edna Mann Shover 
Alice B. Sharrard 
Albert W. Heckman 
Albert W. Heckman 
Albert W. Heckman 
Albert W. Heckman 
Elma S. Ritter 
Mrs. Robert D. Haire 
J. Slocomb 
Hannah B. Overbeck 
Hannah B. Overbeck 
Hannah B. Overbeck 
Hannah B. Overbeck 
Hannah B. Overbeck 
Hannah B. Overbeck 
Hannah B, Overbeck 
Hannah B. Overbeck 
Hannah B. Overbeck 
May B. Hoelscher 
Katherine W. Lindsey 
Dorris D. Mills 
Sarah Ryei Comer 
H. L. Bridwell 
M. B. Hoelscher 
A. V. Lingley 
Ophelia Foley 
Hannah B. Overbeck 



Page 
139 
140 
HI 
142 
143 
144 
144 
J 44 
144 
J 45 
146 

146, 147 
J 47 
148 
149 
150 
J 50 

150, 151 
J 52 
153 

J 54, J 55 
156 
156 
157 
157 
157 

158, 159 
160 
160 



THE OLD RELIABLE iimill FITCH KILNS 



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The thousands of these Kilns in use testify to 
their Good Qualities 



THE ORIGINAL PORTABLE KILN 



INEXPENSIVE TO BUY 
COST LrnXE TO OPERATE 



The only fuels which gire perfect results in 
Glace and Color Tone 




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No. 2 SU«l4xJ2to ...430J)0 ) 

No. 3 Size 16 x »9 in.^^^ 40.00 j G« KHn 2 rfsea 

WRITE FOR DISCOUNTS. 

STEARNS, FITCH & CO., 



Chafwvil Kfln 4 sizes. 



N%l 


SiM fO Z 12 lA...... 


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No. 2 


SiM 16 z (2 la. 


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Sprinqfield, Ohio 



Sf 



Vol. XV. No. 7. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



November I9I3 




HANKSGIVING will soon again be 
with us, a,nd we are counting over 
our blessings as an antidote to our 
usual grumbling humor. Among 
other things we are giving this month 
a number of nut sketches which have 
been long awaited by many sub- 
scribers. We are always thankful 
when we get one of these requests off 
our mind. Then we have, as you can 
see, an unusual Thanksgiving turkey plate and a fruit pi ate that 
suggests good cheei', some childrens' mugs that ought to prove 
helpful as well as amusing with the Christmas season coming on, 
and a unique fish platter among other good things. We had to 
put off the designs from the Four Winds Summer School un- 
til a later date as the color study could not be finished in time 
and for that we ought to be thankful too for we will know that 
we have something good still coming to us. 



We are also thankful that we have a few "drawbacks" 
for we don't have to keep rapping on wood, and that we have 
a few "dislikers," for that proves that we must be geniuses. 
It is only on the dead level that there are no jolts. And, any 
way, we are thankful if just for contrariety because we 
would very much like to be scolding the powers that be in the 
heavens above, the earth beneath and the waters that are 
underneath the earth. But that is an old story. At least 
we are thankful that we can shut our eyes to the dust on our 
mantlepiece and the weeds in our garden and that we can 
make a soup bone last three meals and maybe four, but we'd 
be still more thankful if we could find among our subscribers 
some nice girl or woman who would take the burden of the 
housekeeping and domestic hiring and managing off of our 
shoulders and give us a chance to do something worth while. 
Now this is no joke, it is a real business proposition. If such 
there be let her write to us and we will tell her what nice folk 
we are and what a nice work room she could have in which to 
paint china or make jewelry or do whatever stunt she prefers 
in her spare time and what renumeration we could offer and 
all the other inducements that we could rake or scrape up. 



A correspondent wishes to know the real status of china 
decoration as she has heard that it is not on a par with arts 
such as oil and water color painting. This is a difficult ques- 
tion to answer as so much depends upon the quality of the 
work. A technically clever ceramic decorator who is original 
in design, has good taste in color and has a feeling for fitness, 
is certainly much the superior of an average painter in oils 
or water colors. If she does the best possible work in that 
line, we cannot see why she would not be the equal of any 
artist or craftsman of the same amount of talent. But the 
world at present is laboring under the idea that only painting 
is art. It is gi'adually waking up to the genius of the artist crafts- 
man, and in late yeai's the decorator of cei'amics has taken, 
and is taking, such vast strides in advance of the work of 
former years, that ceramic work is rapidlj' taking its true 
place with the art crafts of the world. It has so long been 



the plaything of woman's idle hours, that men have come to 
think it can never be anything more than any other fancy 
work, but so many are taking up the work seriously that no 
one need feel anything but honor in being in the ranks of cer- 
amic decorators. 



In the illustrations of work of the Four Winds Summer 
School in October issue, the following errors of names were 
made: On page 128, center section, a Satsuma Box, large 
middle plate and smaller etched plate, credited to Mrs. Van 
Pelt, are by Katherine Flood of Hudson Falls, N. Y. So is 
the large Chop Plate on page 134, center of first section. 

The Autumn Competition is closed. The quality, as 
well as quantity, was exceedingly good. We have been obliged 
to return much material which in former years we should 
have purchased, because the editorial drawers are overflowing 
with more designs than we can use in a year. We are becom- 
ing every year more strict in our judging so that the standard 
of designs published is continually averaging higher. The 
first prizes Class A and B awarded to Albert Heckman were 
awarded especially for the fine work in conventionalizing the 
flower forms and for the designs so beautifully executed, al- 
though many others send more exact and detailed drawings 
of the flower itself. It is a delight to the editor to open a 
package of Mr. Heckman's work, every detail is so exquisitely 
executed and so neat and if one may use the word here "self 
respecting." The pages are beautifully arrayed, marked 
and numbered and a careful typewritten list sent of all pages 
with titles so that no mistake can be made. The brush marks 
are so clear, the washes so clean and even; the black so fine; 
the drawing beyond criticism and the designs themselves so 
carefully thought out and so satisfying that the editor's du- 
ties are not only reduced to a minimum but also transformed 
to a pleasure. 

The work of Henrietta Barclay Paist, who received first 
prize in class C, while quite different in style, is equally well 
executed with a firm and assured hand. Mrs. Paist is writing 
a book on design, which is soon to be published and which 
will be beyond doubt of great value to the student. The 
awards in the competition were as follows: 

Prize Class A — Albert W. Heckman. 

Prize Class B — Albert W. Heckman. 

Prize Class C — Henrietta Barclay Paist. 

Mentions: Mrs. V. T. Kissinger, Lucile W. Sharpe, Ida 
Upton Paine, Mrs. M. H. Watkeys. 



A new" "Stained Glass Tour" this time in Italy has just 
been published by the John Lane Company. The author, 
Charles Hitchcock Sherrill, has studied the subject of stained 
glass very intimately and writes about it interestingly. The 
book is illustrated with thirty-three photogravures of the 
various cathedrals and churches where the best examples of 
stained glass can be found. This is the third of a series, the 
other tours being in France and England. 



140 



HER AM I C STUDIO 




rm wfLD v\3RKiiy 




THE WILD TURKEY— EDNA MANN SHOVER 



heramic studio 



HI 




CHOP PLATE, TURKEYS— ALICE B. SHARRARD (Treatment by Jessie M. Bard) 



OUTLINE rather heavily in Gold also the dark spaces 
in tail of turkey and the darkest tones in center design. 
Second fire. Oil the wide space next to the outer band in 
center design and all the bands in the border except the wide 
grey one under the turkey's feet and dust with Dove Grey. 



Oil the light part of turkey, the wide band under the turkey 
and the grey tones m center design, and dust with Yellow for 
Dusting. Oil tail and head of turkey and light part of center 
design, and dust with 2 parts Deep Ivory and 1 part Ivory 
Glaze. 



142 



RIIRAMIC STUDIO 




TRILLIUM—ALBERT W. HECKMAN 



hekamic studio 



143 






CONVENTIONAL SUGGESTIONS, TRILLIUM-ALBERT W. HECKMAN (Treatment page 156) 



144 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




TRILLIUM— PLATE BORDER AND CENTER— ALBERT W. HECKMAN 



SALT SHAKER 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

PAINT the darkest tones 
with Gold. The band at 
the top and the three small 
grey spaces at the lower part of 
the design are Sea Green and a 
little Deep Blue Green, and the 
remainder of the design is 2 
parts Apple Green, 1 part Moss 
Green and a very little Shading 
Green. Second fire — Tint back- 
ground with 2 parts Yellow 
Green and 1 part Yellow Brown 
using it a little heavier at the 
bottom and shading to a deli- 
cate ivory at the top. Retouch 
in Gold. 




PLATE AND BOWL 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

OIL all darkest tones and 
dust with Water Green 
No. 2. Oil the dark grey tone 
and dust with Grey Blue. 

Second fire — Oil all the light 
grey tones and dust with Glaze 
for Green. This can all be 
done in one firing if one is a 
careful worker. 



BOWL— A. W, HECKMAN 





SALT SHAKER— ELMA S. RITTER 



PLATE— MRS. ROBERT D. HAIRE (Treatment page 156) 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



145 



H 



w 
w 

00 



CO 

O 
n 
o 




146 



HlEramic studio 




,n 1\ \ ( 

SUGAR TREE- HANNAH B. OVERBECK 




BUTTERNUT— HANNAH B. OVERBECK 



IIERAMIC STUDIO 



147 



BUTTERNUT- 
HANNAH B. OVERBECK 








WATER BEECH- 
HANNAH B. OVERBECK 



f48 



heramic studio 




RED OAK— HANNAH B. OVERBECK 



(Treatment by Kathryn E. Cherry) 







OUTLINE design with Blood Red, then fire. Then 
oil the leaves with Dusting Medium and dust 
with Coffee Brown, then oil the stems and dust with 
Warm Grey, then oil the nuts and dust with Flor- 
entine Green, then fire, then oil all the darks in leaves 
and dust with Yellow for Dusting, then the caps and 
dust with Green Glaze, then fire and then oil the en- 
tire surface and dust with Green Glaze. 

BLACK WALNUT (Page 150) 

Treatment by Kathryn E. Cherry 

PAINT leaves with Apple Green and Brown Green. 
Stems with Mauve and Apple Green. Blossoms 
with Yellow Green for caps and Blood Red for seeds. 
The small tender leaves have a yellowish caste^ run- 
ning into Yellow Red. Use for this Yellow Brown and 
Yellow for Painting. Use same coloring in second 
firing leaving lights delicate. Strengthen the stems 
with Brown Green and Blood Red. 



nERAMIC STUDIO 



J49 




WHITE OAK— HANNAH B. OVERBECK (Treatment by Kathryn E. Cherry) 



LEAVES are painted in with Yellow Green, Brown 
Green and just a little Shading Green. Stems 
are Brown Green and Auburn Brown. The acorns are 
Brown Green and a little Yellow Brown for caps and 
Auburn Brown and Brown ^Green for the nuts. For 
background use Yellow for Painting and Brown Green. 
Second Fire — Use same colors leaving the lights clear 
and darken the shadows only; wash over the nuts a 
clear color of Yellow Brown. 

COCKSPUR THORN (Page 150) 

Treatment by Kathryn E. Cherry 

FOR the leaves use Yellow Brown and Brown Green; 
the stems are Brown Green and Mauve; [the apples 
are Yellow Brown, Brown Green and Blood Red; the 
blossom ends are Brown Green and Auburn BrowTi. 

Second Firing — Use same coloring for shading, use 
Yellow Green for high lights on leaves. 



AIL - K'^'i^ 0'^ 




150 



tVtRAMlC STUDIO 




BLACK WALNUT-HANNAH B. OVERBECK 







&^\ 




COCKSPUR THORN-HANNAH B. OVERBECK 



HOP TREE- HANNAH B. OVERBECK 



K.ERAM1C STUDIO 



151 




HOP TREE, PTELA TRIFALIATA— HANNAH B. OVERBECK (Treatment page 152) 



152 



MlEkamic studio 




JUDAS TREE, RED BUD—HANNAH B. OVERBECK 

Treatment by Kathryn E. Cherry 

TRACE design in and outline with Warm Grey, then fire. 
Paint pods with Apple Green and Warm Grey shading 
with Brown Green. Leaves are Yellow Green and Brown 
Green. Background is Yellow Green and Mauve and a lit- 
tle Grey For Flesh. The stems are Warm Grey and a little 
Mauve. 

Second Fire — Go over the stems with Apple Green, the 
leaves with Shading Green. 

WATER BEECH (Page 147) 

Treatment by Kathryn E. Cherry 

PAINT leaves in Yellow Green, Albert Yellow. Shade 
with Apple Green and Warm Grey. The blossoms are 
Yellow Green very delicate and Brown Green for shading 
leaving lights almost white; the stems are Brown Green and 
Yellow Brown. 

Second Fire — Use same coloring leaving the lights very 
delicate, these leaves are a yellowish green, so do not paint 
in heavy. 

HOP TREE (Page 151) 

Treatment by Kathryn E. Cherry 

FOR the leaves use Brown Green and Yellow Green; for 
the very deepest tones in leaves use some Shading 
Green with the Brown Green. For the pods use Painting 
Yellow and a little Apple Green, the markings are Yellow 
Brown and Yellow Green. The stems are Auburn Brown and 



a little Mauve. Background, use Albert Yellow, Yellow 
Brown and Warm Grey. 

Second Fire — Use same colors used in first tiring; strengthen 
the darks only leaving the high lights clear. Go over the 
background again with Yellow Green, add a little Shading 
Green to the Warm Grey. 

BUTTERNUT (Pages 146-147) 

Treatment by Kathryn E. Cherry 
pAINT leaves with Yellow Green, Shading Green and a 
A little Black. The nuts are Apple Green and Yellow 
Green. The stems are Shading Green and Mauve. 

Second Fire — Wash a thin wash of Apple Green over 
the leaves and nuts shade the deep tones in leaves with Brown 
Green. 

SUGAR TREE (Page 146) 

Treatment by Kathryn E. Cherry 

PAINT leaves with Yellow Green and Brown Green. The 
pods with Yellow for Painting and Yellow Brown. The 
stems Yellow Brown and Shading Green. 






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nEKAMlC STUDIO 



153 



SHOP NOTES 

We acknowledge with thanks the receipt of a very attrac- 
tive catalogue from the Railsback China Co., of Los Angeles, 
Cal. 

The Dresden Color Co. of Canton, Ohio, has changed 



its name and location. They will be known hereafter as the 
Gaskell Art & China Shop located at 129 Fourth St. N. W. 
Mrs. Esther D. Gaskell will conduct the studio and teach 
Indian Basketry in connection with her china classes. Mrs. 
H. S. Tonjes of N. Y. City assumes the half interest formerly 
owned by Mr. Haskell. 




FRUIT PLATE— MAY B. HOELSCHER 



Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 



ALL bands are Gold. Small space between the two verti- 
cal lines painted with 2 parts Blood Red, 1 part Yellow 
Brown, the longer space is Apple Green, a little Shading Green 
and a touch of Violet. All outlines in Black. Apples are 



red enamel. Use 4 parts Relief White, 1 part Hard Enamel 
and coloring with Yellow Red and a little Yellow Brown. 
Leaves same mixtm-e of enamels and color with Apple Green 
a little Yellow and Brown Green. 



154 



nURAMlC STUDIO 



BITTER SWEET BERRIES (Page 145) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

OUTLINE in Black. Light part of berries is Yellow Brown 
and a little Yellow Red; shadow side Blood Red, Yellow 
Red and a little Black. Leaves, Yellow Brown, Green and 
Moss Green for the lights; Brown Green and a little Dark 
Brown for the darker tone. Stems, Yellow Brown and Dark 
Brown for the lights and a little Black added for the darkest 
tones. Background, Dark Grey and a httle Yellow. 

PARROT TULIPS (Supplement) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

THE yellow tulips are painted in with Yellow for Painting, 
Albert Yellow, Yellow Red with touches of Brown 
Green in the shadows. Red tulips are, Yellow Red, Blood 
Red in shadows. The lights are, Albert Yellow, Yellow 



Brown and Yellow Red. The centers are. Moss Green and 
Black. The greens are Moss Green and Yellow. 

Second Fire — Paint background with Mauve, Yellow for 
Painting, Yellow Brown; the shadow flowers are Yellow Brown, 
Mauve and Brown Green. Strengthen flowers with same 
colors used in first fire leaving the high lights and painting 
the shadow side only. 

FISH SET (Pages 158-159) 

Ophelia Foley 

OIL all dark parts of design except spots on head of fish and 
fins and in the tail of the small fish and dust with 1 
Violet, 2 Yellow Green, 2 Pearl Grey. Oil light part in both 
fish and dust with 3 Ivory Glaze, 1 Albert Yellow, 1 Yellow 
Brown. Oil fins and dark spots on head and dust with 2 Yel- 
low Brown, 1 Albert Yellow, 1 Ivory Glaze. Oil background 
and dust with Pearl Grey and a little Yellow. 




DINNER SET— KATHERINE W. LINDSEY 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



155 




DINNER SET— KATHERINE W. LINDSEY 



Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 




/^IL the space forming the two outer bands, the larger 
^^ space in the inner band, outhne around the flower and 
the two leaf forms on either side of the stem and the stem 
which is oiled solidly and dust with 1 part Warm Grey, 1 part 
Dove Grey. Oil the two spots in the long space in the border 
the two leaves on either side of bud in the border, the small 
space in inner band and the heavy dark space in the two large 
leaves and dust with Bright Green. The oil should be applied 
as light as possible for this. Oil the dark space in bud and 
blossom and dust with Cameo. Oil the small spot just under 
the large blossom and dust with 2 parts Albert Yellow and 1 
part Yellow Brown. 



Full Sized Section of Plate 



156 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



CONVENTIONAL SUGGESTIONS (Page 143) 

Treatments by Jessie M. Bard 
PLATE, TRILLIUM 

OIL all the design except the flower and dust with 1 Yel- 
low Green, | Violet, 1 Pearl Grey, 2 Ivory Glaze. Oil 
the flower and dust with 3 Ivory Glaze, 1 Albert Yellow, 
1 Yellow Brown, 1 Pearl Grey. Center of flower is oiled and 
dusted with with 2 Yellow Red and 1 Yellow Brown. Oil 
back-ground and dust with 2 Pearl Grey, and 1 Palma Rose 
Salmon. 

BOWL, TRILLIUM 
Outline and darkest tones of design in Gold. Grey spaces 
around the flower are oiled and dusted with Cameo. The re- 
maining grey tones are oiled and dusted with Dove Grey. 
The back-ground may be left white or an ivory tint painted 
or dusted over it. 



PLATE (.Page 144) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

PAINT the outline of the flowers, the bands and the line 
design in Gold. Outline the leaves with 1 part Shading 
Green and 2 parts Dark Grey or Grey for Flesh. 

Second Fire — Paint the light flowers with a very thin 
wash of Blood Red to make a delicate pink and the dark ones 
a little heavier, centers are Yellow and stamens are Yellow 
Brown and a little Dark Brown. Leaves are Apple Green 
and a little Yellow Green and a little Yellow Brown. 




L 



RABBIT MUG-DORRIS D. MILLS 

OWER part of mug Albert Yellow with a touch of Black. 



Brown added. Moon, Albert Yellow. Rabbits, bands and 
spots Copenhagen Blue, with a touch of Black and Albert 
Yellow. 





CUP AND SAUCER— SARAH RYEL COMER 

Trace in design in Outlining Black then fire. Then dust dark with 1 part Apple Green, 2 parts Pearl Grey, 1 part Grey 
For Flesh, The medium_Grey_is Lemon Yellow 1 part, 2 parts Pearl Grey. The stems are Green Gold. 



HERAMIC STUDIO 



15? 




CHILD'S PITCHER— H. L. BRIDWELL 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

OUTLINE in Black and a little Banding Blue. The 
three upper light bands, the wide light part of design 
in the border and the grey spots on body of cat are White 
Gold. 

Second Fire — Oil all the darkest tones and dust with 
Dark Blue for Dusting. Oil the light tone of the cat and dust 
with 3 Pearl Grey, 1 Violet No. 2, pinch of Deep Blue Green. 
Oil the background and dust with 2 Ivory Glaze, | Pearl 
Grey and a little Yellow Brown. 



CHILD'S MUG-M. B. HOELSCHER 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

OUTLINE Banding Blue and a little Black and Aztec 
Blue. Bands and windows in wind mill are painted 
in with the same color. 

Second Fire — Oil light part of wind mill and dust with 
2 Pearl Grey, 1 Dark Grey or Grey for Flesh. Oil dark part 
of mill and dust with 2 Dark Grey, 1 Pearl Grey and a little 
Copenhagen Blue. Oil dark part of cow, lower part of mug 
and the dark gi'ey on handle and dust with 1 Banding Blue, 
1 Copenhagen Grey, 1 Copenhagen Blue. Oil the light back- 
ground and dust with 1 Ivory Glaze, ^ Pearl Grey and a pinch 
of Deep Blue Green.. 




CHILD'S CUP-A. V. LINGLEY 



Treatment by Jessie M, Bard 



T>AINT all parts of the design except the chickens with 2 Brown. The feet with Yellow and a little Yellow Brown. 

-t parts Banding Blue and 1 part Copenhagen Blue. Out- The comb with equal parts Blood Red and Carnation. If a 

line the chickens with the same. Paint all but the feet and background tint is desired use Pearl Grey and a little Yellow 

comb of the chicken with Yellow Brown and a little Dark Brown. 



158 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



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ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

P- A.— You mentioned in magazine some material to be bought for clean- 
ing soot from pipes without remo^dng them,. I have made several inquiries 
but camiot find it. 

A. — The material for cleaning out the kiln is powdered zinc and can be 
found in a large drug store. The zinc is thrown into the pan while the oil 
is burning. About one tablespoonful of it. 

Mrs. D. M. B.— Must I use unfluxed gold over raised paste alwaysl I want 
to do some raised letters on a cliiua (Plaviland) set of dishes. I have never 
used much paste and never any unfluxed gold. My dishes are the Star 
Pattern and have a small raised sort of scallop on edge and I want to raise 
the letters slightly. 

2 — I want to tint some plates and bowls cream and put a gold band 
and letters. Will you tell me — must I dig out the band and letters or can 
I tint and fire and then put gold and letters on the fired color? I have my 
own kiln and can fire as many times as I wish. Will gold wear as well if put 
on over the fired color? 

3 — I want to use silver over raised paste, will just plain silver do or 
should I use white gold? and is there unfluxed white gold? Would just 
white gold do? I want to use silver on a Belleek Tea Set. What silver do 
you suggest for best success? Is it always best to use unfluxed gold on Bel- 
leek china? Will other gold do at all? Can you tell me where I could get 
some fancy 3-letter monograms? I have old Enghsh but can't get fancy 
3-letter monograms. I can draw some but I was especially interested in 
L. W. B. and can't draw a pretty one. 



A. ]— It is best to use unfluxed gold over paste unless the paste is very 
flat. The unfluxed gold is used like any other gold. 

A. 2 — If the tmt is not very dark you can fire it and then use the unfluxed 
gold over it. It is usually best to wipe out the color when possible as the 
gold will come out better if it is not over a color. It wears as well over the 
color as it does on the plain china. 

A. 3 — White Gold is better to use as it does not tarnish as soon as the 
silver. Always use unfluxed gold on beUeek, there is no unfluxed white 
gold; if you apply the white gold to belleek, fire it very light. Any of the 
A^Tiite Golds are satisfactory. Jewelers usually make monograms; you 
•ndll also find firms advertismg monograms in this magazine at different times. 

Mrs. R. D. — I want to paint a dinner set like the design that won first prize 
in your competition (on page 185 of your Jan. Kemmic) and do not fully under- 
stand the treatment. Is the design outlined and with what? and how can 
you outhne the stems and then the bands next to them without the oil run- 
ning into the stems? 

A. — The design is not to be outlined if you wish to do it in one fire. If 
an outhne is preferred use 2 parts Grey For Flesh, 1 part Copenhagen Blue. 
The oil is not apphed heavy enough to run ; when applying one color next to 
another the first color is applied and the edge cleaned and straightened and 
then the oil for the next color is painted just up to it, care being taken not to 
run into the other color. 

A. R. E.— Why is it in using M. Masons' Hard Black with grounding oil it 
fires with a glaze when I supposed it would produce a dull effect? 

A. — The Masons' Hard Black was fired too hot which causes it to have 
a glaze, it should have a medium fire. 




PLATE CONVENTIONALIZED FROM HOLLY LEAF- HANNAH B. OVERBECK 



T>AINT entire surface of plate with Pearl Grey and a little 
A Albert Yellow. Second Fire. — Trace in design and 
outline with Yellow Brown and Grey for Flesh. Paint in 



dark parts of design with two parts Yellow Brown and one 
part Brown Green. The Grey space is two parts Yellow 
Brown and one />art Albert Yellow, 



Everything for Artists and China Painters 

You'll find here the best 
goods and a full assortment. 

Catalogs sent on request. 

MAKE YOUR BANDING 
EASY 

with "Arto" Banding Wheel 
It is self-centering and made better than ever. Every user is 
pleased with it. We also are selling agents for Revelation Kihis 
outside Cook Co., 111. 

A. H. ABBOTT & CO., 127 North Wabash Avenue, Chicago 




IF YOU WISH TO 

BEGIN YOUR SUBSCRIPTION 

with the 

May 1913 Number 

of KERAMIC STUDIO (the first of the 15th vol.) we have a 
few back numbers to date, but the quantity is limited 

DON'T HOLD YOUR ORDER TOO LONG 

Bound copies of Vol. 14 now on hand, $5.50 express paid 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISfflNG CO. 
SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



Keramic Studio Magazine 
Mailed FREE for One Year!! 



A PREMIUM WORTH YOUR BEST EFFORT— LIMITED TO FEBRUARY 1, 1914 



For a Ciish of Five Yearly Subscribers, new or renewals, at $3.65 each, we will give One Year 
Sabscription to Keramic Studio worth $4.00, or One Full Set of K* E. Cherry's New Dusting Colors 
(16 vials) worth $4.80. (This last by special arrangement with the manufactures,) 




It's a Question 
of Dollars 
for You 



H^Tn^APAsforl ^"^ ■'""' ""■■ Additional 
^iniereSiea ^^ of Premiums 



KERAMIC STUDIO PUBUSHING CO., SYRACUSE, N. ¥. 



s 

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WE NOW HAVE A 

FULL LINE of ENAMELS 

FOR BOTH HARD and SOFT GLAZES 

of which a list will be sent 
on application 



THE FRY ART COMPANY 

35-37 West 3l8t Street 
NEW YORK CITY 



^1 






K-EL.EL.-P T'H 



F"l R-l 



/V-.UI V^Ew 



CONTRIBUTORS 



JESSIE M. BARD 
JANE P. BAKER 
BURLEY & CO. 
ALICE W. DONALDSON 
HALLIE DAY 
ALBERT W. HECKMAN 
MRS. W. C. McDONOUGH 
FLORENCE MILTON 
HENRIETTA B. PAIST 
EDITH ALMA ROSS 
LEAH H. RODMAN 
GEORGIA SPAINHOWER 
ABBIE P. WALKER 
WM. G. WHITFORD 
C L. WIARD 



^S: 



''^m£^^ 



DEC. MClWXIII Price 40c. Yearly Subscription $4.00 



The entire contents of this Magazine are covered by the general copyright, and the articles must not be reprinted without special permission 



CONTENTS OF DECEMBER, 1913 



^•xa* 



Editorial Notes 

Hony 

Checkerberry 

Elder Blossom 

Bluet 

Satswma Boxes, Blttet 

Bowl, BIttet 

Tea Caddy and Sttgar Bowl, BI«et 

Cttp, Saucer and Plate, Bluet 

Choke Cherry, Semi-Naturalistic 

Panel, Composition, Wild Rose 

Wild Rose units for adaptation 

Wild Rose Details 

Vases, Wild Rose Motif 

Answers to Correspondents 

Details of Supplement, Yellow Daisies (Black Eyed Susan) 

Holly Designs for Photo Frame and Salt and Pepper in 

Enamels 
Mistletoe Designs for Trinket Boxes 
Holly Design for Bon Bon 
Treatments for Holly Studies 
Autumn Leaves and Berries 
Burley & Co/s Exhibition 
Designs of Mistletoe 
Mistletoe Design for Nut Bowl 
HoUy Plate 
Mistletoe and Holly 
Holly Design for Cup and Saucer 
Fruit Plate, Apples 
Supplement, Teapot, Yellow Daisies (Black Eyed Susan) 



Alice W. Donaldson 
Edith Alma Ross 
Wm. G. Whitford 
Albert W. Heckman 
Albert W. Heckman 
Albert W. Heckman 
Albert W. Heckman 
Albert W. Heckman 
C. L. Wiard 
Henrietta B. Paist 
Henrietta B. Paist 
Henrietta B. Paist 
Henrietta B. Paist 

Henrietta B. Paist 

Leah H. Rodman 
Henrietta B. Paist 
Georgia B. Spainhower 
Abbie P. Walker 
Jane P. Baker 

Abbie P. Walker 
Georgia B. Spainhower 
Mrs. W. C. McDonough 
Hallie Day 

Georgia B. Spainhower 
Florence Milton 
Henrietta Barclay Paist 



Page 

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108 
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120-130 

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122 
122 
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124-127 
127 
127 
128 
J 29 
129 
130 
128 



iS 



THE OLD RELIABLE lElm FITCH KILNS 



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The thousands of these Kilns in use testify to 
their Good Qualities 



THE ORIGINAL PORTABLE KILN 



INEXPENSIVE TO BUY 
COST LITTLE TO OPERATE 




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The only fuels which give perfect results in ^^ __„^ 

Glaze and Color Tone 'l^^'^afr" O^^^^in'"'''' 

No.2 SizeI4xI2m $30.00) /No. I Size 10 x 12 in $15.00 

No. 3 Size 16 x 19 in 40.00 ^^ K«" ^ sizes ^^^^ ^^ ^ ^^^^^ ^o. 2 Size 16 x J2 in 20.00 

1 No. 3 Size 16 x 15 m 25.00 

WRITE FOR DISCOUNTS. (No. 4 Size t& x 26 in 50.00 

STEARNS, FITCH & CO., SPRINGFIELD, OHIO 



Vol. XV. No. 8. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



December 191 3 




E present this month the first prize 
work in the Autumn Competition. 
The supplement by Mrs. Henrietta 
Barclay Paist is not the applied de- 
sign in the set for which the prize 
was given but belongs to another of 
the submitted sets. While the Wild 
Rose study was more thoroughly 
carried out according to specifica- 
tions and for this reason was awarded 
the prize in Class C, we considered this applied design 
in color of Black-eyed Susan rather more satisfying. The 
design is quite effective on the white china as well as on the 
brown tint, and could be carried out also in other colors with 
good results. Blue or violet flowers with the green leaves 
would be particularly attractive on a white ground, also with 
a fine tracery in gold or faint color in the background. The 
Wild Rose Studies were executed on the same dull brown 
backgi'ound as the supplement and made very attractive 
color schemes. 

The study of the Bluet flower with details which ac- 
companied Mr. Heckman's prize study in Class B. was not 
the careful study of a flower that many of the other 
studies were, but from the nature and simplicity of the flower 
itself there was not much to tell in drawing, and, as the con- 
ventionalized units and applied designs were far and away 
the best and most varied of any submitted, we considered them 
for our purposes the most deserving of the prize. We feel 
as if the designs accompanying the study will be a veritable 
gold mine for many of our decoratois for they can be either 
used as they are or taken in part and simplified for little things 
for Christmas. 

We are publishing also for Christmas use a lot of Holly 
and Mistletoe designs that we have gathered in the past year, 
which should also prove helpful to our hohday workers. 

We have received from Florence Levy, Editor of the 
American Art Annual a reprint of an article published by 
the American Federation of Arts, entitled "The Importance 
of Art Museums in our smaller cities" by Robert De Forest, 
one of the Directors of the Metropolitan Museum. The 
article is strong and to the point. He insists that the function 
of an Art Museum in a small city is inherently quite as im- 
portant as a public library from an educational standpoint, 
and if the editor of Keramic Studio may be allowed to say 
anything so in variance with the accepted ideas and so opposed 
to the Carnegie creed, we would add that we consider it far 
more useful to the community^ for we believe the public library 
of to-day is a pubhc nuisance and a hindrance to the making 
of manly men and womanly women. That sounds icono- 
clastic but as a matter of fact we have too many books in the 
public libraries and for the serious minded the way is made 
too difficult in selecting the most worthy of study. Time and 
strength are wasted in reading much that is unnecessary and 
more that is misleading, while the conglomerate mixture 
and mass of fiction is making of our youth and maidens vis- 
ionary book-worms, their minds filled with a fantastic melange 
that they live from day to day in a dream of unrealties, de- 



vouring the pages of one book only to rush to the library for 
another and it is almost impossible, when the habit becomes 
fixed, to get them out into the open for fresh air and exercise; 
and as for practical or useful information, they have acquired 
such a distaste for real work that one would wonder what 
will become of our future generations if we did not know that 
when conditions in any line become unbearable, the race will 
rise in its might and find a remedy. We trust that all books 
will not be consigned to a universal bonfire but some drastic 
weeding out should certainly be done. 

To return to Mr. De Forest's brochure. It certainly 
is time that the American public began to receive the culture 
that should follow education, and for culture a fairly clear 
insight into the arts is necessary. Painting, Sculpture and 
Music of course, but we would like to add a plea also for the 
art crafts in our Museums. For, in the first place, to bring 
art into the home, the articles of daily use should be well 
designed and inspiring in color, form and execution. The 
articles of ornament and decoration next should be choice 
in material and inspiration. Art has too long been associated 
in the public mind with painting and sculpture alone, the 
choice examples of which the poor or the comparatively poor 
cannot hope to personally possess. Any one can learn to 
appreciate objects of art in some line of the art crafts and, if 
not to make them himself, to love them well enough to man- 
age to possess himself of one or more examples. Then if 
each art Museum would show not only specimens of the great 
art crafts of ancient times but consider it necessary to have 
an example of the work of every worth while contempoi-ary 
art craftsman, a greater impetus would be given to art appre- 
ciation than could be obtained in any other way, for in the 
present day the craftsmen of inspiration are discouraged 
from doing their best because of the almost absolute lack of 
a market for their best efforts, and in these days of high cost 
of living, the moments are so precious as they fly that we 
dare not use many of them for executing one's ideals when 
bread and butter must be eai^ned. The opportunity for 
comparing modern work with the best of ancient art, more- 
over, would by contrast stimulate the craftsmen to greater 
effort. So while we heartily endorse the appeal of Mr. De 
Forest for Art Museums in the smaller cities, we would add 
even more heartily an appeal for representation of modern 
handicraft along with the ancient objects of art, not only in 
the smaller cities but in the greater ones as well. 

CHICAGO CERAMIC ASSOCIATION 

An interesting illustrated account of the fall exhibit of 
the Chicago Ceramic Association has reached us a little too 
late to appear in this issue. It wfll be published in January 
number. 

LITTLE THINGS TO MAKE 

We are rushing through our new book of "Little Things 
to make." containing a number of excellent designs for small 
pieces and five color supplements. As this book will be most 
useful for Christmas work, we will try to have it ready as 
early as possible in December. 



108 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




HOLLY— ALICE W. DONALDSON 



ELDER BLOSSOM (Page 109) 

THIRST Fire — The first painting is done chiefly with green 
-T and violet. There should be plenty of violet used in 
the first painting, as it makes a foundation which qualifies 
the colors which are washed over it afterward and helps to 
harmonize them. Wash in the dark in the background and 
into this paint the forms very vigorously and crisply, leaving 
plenty of light in the flowers and light part of background as 
the tendency in subsequent paintings is to darken everything 
and lose the transparency. Use Violet No. 2, Albert Yellow, 
Fry's New Green, Shading Green or Brown Green. Leave 
the flowers very light and flat, reserving the detail for the 
next painting. When work is diy, dust with Fry's Grey Green, 
Violet No. 2 and Ivory Glaze (the latter used in the palest 
part of background, and over the flowers.) 

Second Fire — Define flowers with mixture of Moss Green 
and Albert Yellow, and any accent on foliage may now be 
added. 

The third painting consists of a thin wash of Sea Green 
to envelop the entire study in a tone of cool green. The wash 
over the flowers should be very pale indeed and also over the 
light part of background, but may be thicker over the dark 
green. When dry dust flowers and light part with Ivory 
Glaze and the darker part with Copenhagen Blue. 

CHECKERBERRY 

Edith Alma Ross 

PAINT berries with Yellow Brown and a little Yellow Red 
for lights and Blood Red and a little Carnation for dark 
side. Leaves are Apple Green and a little Moss Green shaded 
with Brown Green and a little Violet. The more delicate leaves 
are Apple Green and a little Violet shaded with a little Shad- 
ing Green. Stems are Apple Green, Moss Green and a little 
Yellow Brown with Dark Brown for the darkest touches. 
Background a thin wash of Yellow for the lightest tones shaded 
into delicate Violet and Apple Green. 




CHECKERBERRY— EDITH ALMA ROSS 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



109 





ELDERBERRY— WILLIAM G. WHITFORD 



no 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




BLUET— ALBERT W. HECKMAN 

For painting the' natural flower use Deep Blue Green, Banding Blue and Peach Blossom. The leaves and buds are a 
Light Yellow Green. The conventional units may be used in making all-over patterns, bands, panels, borders, etc. 

First Prize Class B, Wild Flower Design Competition. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



III 






SATSUMA BOXES, BLUET— ALBERT W. HECKMAN 

Carry out these designs with Gold and Soft Enamels. 





BOWL, BLUET— ALBERT W. HECKMAN 

This may be carried out in three tones of Dark Blue hard enamel or with enamel and ] 
First Prize Class B, Wild Flower Design Competition. 



112 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




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TEA CADDY, BLUET— ALBERT W. HECKMAN 




TEA CADDY 

Albert W. Heckman 

FIRST fire. — Paint in the whole design with Green Gold. 
Second Fire — Wash over the whole jar with Light 
Green Lustre. Wipe out the flowers and paint in with Yellow 
Lustre. 

Third Fire — Go over all the gold. 
>- .^r 

MISTLETOE AND HOLLY (Page 129) 

Hallie Day 

NO 1. Outline in Black or dark green. Band back of mis- 
tletoe Gold. The leaves in Light Green, leaving the 
berries White. Light cream tint over all. 

2. Outhne in Gold, do berries in Capucine Red. Leaves 
in ^ Olive and | Grass Green. Two dark bands in Green Brown 
and background to the band Dark Green Lustre. Either 
of these designs can be applied to several things: talcums, 
sugars, tumblers, ice boats, tobacco jars and others. 

DESIGNS OF MISTLETOE (Page 127) 

Ahhie P. Walker 

THESE little arrangements of Mistletoe may be fitted to 
a variety of small Sedji forms and the formula given 
will assure a pleasing color. Oi;tline with Fry's Dark Green. 
Make a stock of two parts soft enamel, two parts relief white 
and one part flux. Mix two parts Royal Green and one part 
Apple Green. For the bands and leaves mix half and half 
color and stock and flow on smoothly. For the berries use 
the stock alone or add a little Silver Yellow and Brown 4 to 
make a creamy color. By using syrup in the outline it may 
all be done in one fire. A pleasing effect may be obtained by 
painting the bands in silver or green gold. 

STUDIO NOTE 

Miss Leah H. Rodman, 7 Parkside Court, Brooklyn, 
N. Y., has given up her New York Studio but will retain her 
classes in Brooklyn and will hereafter give more time to de- 
signing. 




SUGAR BOWL, BLUET— ALBERT W. HECKMAN 
Use same treatment as for Cup, Saucer and Plate shown on page 114. 
First Prize Class B, Wild Flower Design Competition. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



113 




CUP, SAUCER AND PLATE, BLUET^ALBERT W. HECKMAN 

One treatment is to give the plate a wash of Light Green. Paint in the leaves with two tones of Green and use Lemon Yellow 
for the flowers. Another treatment is to use Gold for the leaves and bands with hard enamel for the flowers. 



First Prize Class B, Wild Flower Design Competition, 



114 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




CUP, SAUCER AND PLATE, BLUET— ALBERT W. HECKMAN 



THIS same design for sugar. Tint the background with 
a wash of delicate Grey Green. Paint in all the black 
parts of the design with Green Gold. For the little bluets 



use Deep Blue Green, Banding Blue, Pearl Grey and Lemon 
Yellow. For the leaves and buds use Yellow Green, Pearl 
Grey and a little Peach Blossom for the tips of the buds. 



First Prize Class B, Wild Flower Design Competition. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



115 




CHOKE CHERRY, SEMI-NATURALISTIC— C. L. WIARD Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

Leaves are Apple Green and Brown Green. Stems are Brown Green and Shading Green. The cherries are Banding Blue, 
Mauve and Black. The backgi'ound is Mauve and Copenhagen Blue. Use same colors in second firing. 



116 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



WILD ROSE UNITS TO BE ADAPTED (Page 117) 

Henrietta B. Paist 

THE border and units may be adapted to shapes in var- 
ious ways. The httle border of rose hips is beautiful 
with the unit in bright Red (Blood Red or Pompadour), the 
darker space or path in Gold and the panels in Deep Ivory 
(Neutral Yellow). 

The whole outhned in Black. 

The circle and oval units may be placed on bowls, pitch- 
ers, etc., and connected with abstract line panels, etc. The 
rectangular unit may be repeated to form a border and the 
triangular or upright units may be repeated on small vases, 
steins or bowls. They may be treated flat or in enamels, 
coloring much the same as suggested for larger designs, or 
they may be done in flat and raised gold and make a beauti- 
ful chaste decoration in this way. 



VASES, WILD ROSE MOTIF (Pages 119, 120) 

Henrietta B. Paist 

TINT entire vase mth a warm grey made by mixing 
Mason's Neutral Yellow and Warm Grey. After fir- 
ing, trace on the design and lay the space behind the design 
with another wash of Warm Grey to deepen. Clean out the 
design and lay the petals of flowers with a light wash of Pom- 
padour Red, the leaves with Ivy Green, and the stems with 
a thin wash of Brown. The space above the design is dusted 
with Gray Green. The tiny center of flower is Grey Green 
and the stamens of Gold. After firing outline the entire 
design with unfluxed Gold. The stamens may be of raised 
paste, for second fire, and covered with unfluxed Gold for 
third fire. If one wishes to use enamels, the petals of the 
flower may be laid with Old Pink Enamel. This is very 
effective with the stamens in raised paste. 




PANEL, COMPOSITION, WILD ROSE— HENRIETTA B. PAIST 



LAY the background with a tint made by mixing Neutral 
Yellow, I Warm Grey and Brown Green. After fir- 
ing lay the stems with a soft wood brown blending into green 
at the tender stock (small leaves). Leaves are two values 
of Grey Green. Petals of flowers, thin wash of Pompadour 



Red, calyx center of flowers, a soft green. Stamens, Yel- 
low deepened at the tips with Yellow Brown. The extra 
line around the design is made with Brown Green or Grey 
and adds to the decorative eflFect of the whole. The Composi- 
tion may be adapted to a vase or bowl in Japanese style. 



First Prize, Class C Wild Flower Design Competition. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



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WILD ROSE DETAILS— HENRIETTA B. PAIST 

First Prize Class C, Wild Flower Designs Competition. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



119 




WILD ROSE MOTIF— HENRIETTA B. PAIST 

First Prize Class C, Wild Flower Design Competition. 



(Treatment Page 116) 



120 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




71 



WILD ROSE MOTIF— HENRIETTA B. PAIST 

(Treatment page 116) 

First Prize Class C, Wild Flower Design Competition. 



ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

Mts. C. D. — Will you please tell me the most nccunilc way of getting straigh 
lines and eve?i spacings from top to botlom of a vase which is narrower at the 
hotlomf 

Also jrhich are the most satisfactory colors {Fry's) to use for Ground Laying. 
I havr ji'yi rrn-ii'rd from the firing a vase of which tme section ivas ground laid 
with Ffi/'s Ailcr Blue for 1 si fire and winch was salisfaclory when fired and 
which I did not retouch for 2d fire, hut which came from the 2d firing rough and 
"crackled". Is it because it was not padded enough for the 1 si fire? 

To divide a vase which is larger at the top than the bottom take a ]>lale 
divider (which can be found at any art dealers) , divide the top in as many 
sections as you wish, then hold the vase directly in front of you and draw a 
straight line down from any of the divisions. One of the new flexible rulers 
is a great help in this. Then divide the bottom of the vase from this Une and 
place tlie flexible rale between the corresponding marks at the top and 
bottom of vase and draw the line between. 

Any of the ground laying colors are satisfactory — the trouble was prob- 
ably in the wa.y it was applied or in the firing. It is hard to say without 
seeing the piece but the trouble is probably due to the color being applied 
too heavily, the oil was either apphed too heavily or it was not padded long 
enough or possibly you did not allow it to dry long enough before applying the 
color. 

Mrs. B. J. — Shoidd Antique Bronze Gold be padded slightly In obtain a 
smooth effect.' Ail I hare erer seen has .shown bru^h 7narks. Can a good bronze 
effect be obtaimd hi/ u.snuj iiiijhiied gold over fired -mat bronze green and should 
Ike gold be padded in iln'.s ra.sc' 

I want to put a, design in gold over a bronze background. May nnjhixed. 
gold be used over Antique Bronze Gold and come out bright? 

Antique Bronze Gold cannot be padded. The cause of the brush marks 
showing is cither tliat it was not painted on evenly or it wtis over-fired; if it 
was api)lied on Bclleok (tic lat tor is very likely the reason, it is not verj- easily 
over-fired on china, it should be apphed in two thin washes. 

The unfluxed gold over bronze would change the color of the gold 
and would not be satisfactory. Possibly the unfluxed gold would come out 
bright over the bronze with two applications. It is best to make a test on 
a broken piece of china when in doubt. 

C. H. — In so many of the treatments dusting is called for when Fry's Special 
Tinling Oil i.s u.scd, .should il he padded'? And especially in, small spaces. 

How is llir /loirdi red pa. -:1c for raised gold mixedf 

The Special Tinting <->il need not be padded in small places if it is applied 
very thin and even, but it is necessary to pad it in large spaces. 

Powdered paste is niixe<i with a drop of Fat Oil of Turpentine, not enough 
to hold the paste together but just to darken the color very slightly, breathe 
on it quite a while until it seems moist and rub it thoroughly with a horn 
knife and then add Lavender Compound as a medium, do not rub it hard 
after adding the Lavender. 



killdh, Irll 
ml ds nd.hu 
■lid Slim, 1 1 III,. ■ 



,rh,if., 



nt,i! 



In. 



mil ni]iiiri:s a hard, 
n, <l d IT' rijiriirie in 
■I <i>ic plnrr iind then 



K. V. C— Would ijo 
niediim or light fin: lo pn 
the Kiln crcepl way buck 
again it does not rub. 

We do not know what you mean by platiinmi. Do you mean tlie lustre 
(silver lustre) or white gold? If you mean white gold, it certainly needs a 
hard fire. As a rule, any color which rubs off is not fired hard enough. Your 
firings are probably uneven. If you cannot judge accurately of the point of 
filing from the color in the kiln, use cones. Cones 019 and 018 will give 
light firings. Cones 017 and 016, medium. Cone 015, hard. 

A. R. E. — Why is it in using M. Mason's Hard Black {with groundiug oil) 
il fires with a glaze when I supposed it woidd produce a dull effect? 

The Mason's Hard Black was fired too hot which causes it to have a 
glaze. It should have a medium fire. 

Margaret — 7s there a Canadian firm handling Belleek and Salsuma ware? 

Can I prepare white enamel for Satsuma Belleek and Favorite or is it bel- 
ter to buy from Mr. Phillips whose enameU dte reliable f 

Why is Flux .sometimes added? 

Have the colored enamels an adva.nlage over (he while lirileU with La Croix 
colors f 

We do not know of a Canadian firm handling Satsuma and Belleek ware, 
but there ought to be firms having them. Try Williams Art Importing 
Co., Toronto. 

You can either prepare your own enamels or use a ready prepared ena- 
mel for the Satsuma, Belleek and Favorite. 

Flux is added to make the enamel fire at a lower heat, the more flux is 
added the less heat is required. 

The advantage in using colored enamel, is that they are ready for use 
and save the trouble of mi.ving and you are always siu-e of your color. 

(.Continued on page 130) 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



121 




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o 

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122 



KERAMIC STUDIO 






HOLLY DESIGN FOR SALT AND 

PEPPER IN ENAMELS 

LEAH H.RODMAN. 



MISTLETOE DESIGN FOR TRINKET BOX— HENRIETTA B. PAIST 




TREATMENT FOR HOLLY STUDIES 

Abbie P. Walker 

OUTLINE carefully with Dark Green putting in all the 
little accents which give character and style to the 
drawing. Oil leaves, stems and outer frame and dust with 
Gray Green. Paint berries with Blood Red. Retouch leaves, 
shading slightly with Grounding Green. Repaint berries 
with Yellow Red. For the last fire, tint Pearl Gray over all 
and when dry rub the same color into the tint. Wipe out the 
red. 

ON SATSUMA 

Outline carefully with Dark Green and fire. Oil outer 
background, stems and distant leaves ' and dust with 
Gray Green. On the nearer leaves flow thinly Walker's Leaf 
Green Enamel. For the berries Walkers Dark Red Enamel, 
quite thick. Leave the panel the color of the Satsuma. 



HOLLY DESIGN FOR BON BON— GEORGIA B. SPAINHOWER 




HOLLY DESIGN FOR PHOTOj^ FRAME IN 
ENAMELS— LEAH H. RODMAN 




HOLLY DESIGN FOR TRINKET BOX— HENRIETTA B. PAIST 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



123 




AUTUMN LEAVES AND BERRIES— JANE P._ BAKER Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 



LIGHTEST berries are Violet and a little Deep Blue Green. 
Banding Blue and Violet for the middle tones and||Deep 
Purple and Banding Blue for the darkest; a touch of Black 
may be added if necessary. Leaves are Yellow and Brown 



Green with occasional touches of Yellow Brown for the lights. 
Blood Red and Auburn Brown for the darker tones, the vein- 
ing is Auburn Brown with a very little Black. Background 
is Pearl Grey and a little Yellow Brown. 



124 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




MR. OTTO TREPTE— THIRD PRIZE, NATURALISTIC 

BURLEY & GO'S EXHIBITION 

A NATIONAL display of Ceramic Art which exhibits 
-^^ annually in Chicago at Burley's, was shown the second 
Monday in September, according to their established custom 
and continued for ten days. The scope was larger than prev- 
ious years and showed praiseworthy progress. Four years 
ago the division of the exhibition was about three-fourths 
naturalistic; this year it was almost reversed, far the larger 
number being decorated with conventional ornament. 

This opportunity for presenting and comparing work in 
a collective exhibition is a distinct benefit to all the workers 
in the field and the appreciation of this privilege is shown by 
the constantly increasing numbers. 

The exhibition contained 385 pieces coming from eighty- 
five exhibitors, representing about twenty towns. The ex- 
hibits were tastefully arranged on eighteen tables, decorated 
with flowers and ribbons to harmonize with the displays. 

It was regretted that in the prize awards.the consignment 
of Canadian work was not in competition. This was owing 
to a technicality in the entry to the Customs which prevented 
delivery. 

Prizes and Mentions were distributed as follows :^For 
work in Conventional Ornamient, the first prize (No. 247) 
was awarded to Miss M. C. McCormick of Springfield, Mo. 
The second prize (No. 211) went to Miss Sarah Hewen of 
Chicago. The third prize (No. 301) was received by Miss 
Esther L. Allfree of New Orleans. 





MISS AGNES M. WESCHLER— HON. MENTION, NATURALISTIC 

There were three Honorable Mentions in the above 
class, given to Mrs. L. E. Bartlett of Tulsa, Oklahoma, (No. 
210), Mrs. I. C. Kissinger of Riverside, Illinois, (No. 208) 
and Mrs. EfRe George of Kokoma, Indiana, (No. 287). 

The three prizes for Naturalistic Decoration were re- 
ceived respectively by: Mr. E. Challinor, (No. 55), Mrs. E. 
Heimerdinger, (No. 51) and Mr. Otto Trepte, (No. 36) all of 
Chicago. 

Mr. E. J. Mulvaney, (No. 72) and Miss M. South of 
Chicago, (No. 82) and Miss Agnes M. Weschler of Erie, Penn- 
sylvania, (No. 66) were the recipients of Honorable Mention. 

Miss McCormick's piece was a square comport executed 
in masses of semi-conventional fruits enclosed by narrow bands 
of gold. 

Miss Hewen's chop dish was decorated in cartouches of 
flowers divided by geometric ornament on an ivory back- 
ground. 

Miss Allfree's third prize winner was a bon-bon dish or- 
namented with purple flowers mingled with green and gold. 

Mrs. Bartlett's piece was a vase, a harmony in tans, 
greys and greens, lighted with gold. 

Mrs. George's plate showed a design of stenciled effects 
in two shades of green with blue accents. 

Especially attractive was Mrs. Kissinger's tea pot stand 
in flat ornament executed in blue greys on a pearl grey ground. 

The first prize in the Naturalistic Ornament was a vase 
done in landscape effects, similar to the mat colors of Rook- 
wood pottery. Its motive consisted of roses in the foreground 
and. trees in the distance. "Springtime," (No. 57) "Old 
Fashioned Garden" (No. 56) and "Reflection" (No. 58) are 
other quaint conceits from the same brush. 

The second prize in this class was a bowl completely 
covered inside and outside with a beautifully executed motive 




HON. MENTIONS CONVENTIONAL DECORATIONS 

No. 287— Plate, Mrs. Effie George, Kokomo, Ind. 

No. 208— Teapot Stand, Mrs. I. C. Kissinger, Riverside, III. 



SPECIMENS OF CONVENTIONAL DECORATIONS, PUPILS OF ART 
INSTITUTE, CHICAGO 
Mrs. Abbie P. Walfcer, Instructor 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



125 




PRIZES CONVENTIONAL DECORATION 

First Prize, No. 247 — Square Comport, Miss C. M. McCormick, Springfield, Mo. 
Second Prize, No. 211—010? Dish, Miss Sarah Hewen, Chicago, III. Third Prize, No. 301— Octogon Comport, Miss Esther L. Allfree, New Orleans, La. 




SPECIMENS OF CONVENTIONAL DECORATION— MISS H. PETERSON, CHICAGO 

Not in competition at her request. 



126 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




PUPILS ART INSTITUTE CHICAGO— MISS ABBIE P. WALKER, INSTRUCTOR 



of gooseberries. All the tones were soft, yet they managed 
to give a depth of coloring that was felt even in the lightest 
shades. The all-over background contributed much to the 
atmospheric effects. 

Mr. Otto Trepte certainly excells in technique. His 
chocolate set which won for him the third prize was a marvel 
of accuracy of the units and in the gold etching. 

Unfortunately Miss H. Peterson and Mrs. LeRoy T. 
Steward were not in competition. Mrs. Steward was repre- 



sented by but one piece (No. 203), a long tray, purely geo- 
metrical in ornament with color schemes of blues, green, man- 
ganese pink and reds. She shaded the blue masses from deep 
to light and the pinks from a brownish shade to rose and filled 
some of the smaller spaces with red, running to orange, dem- 
onstrating that a pleasing contrast may be obtained by using 
two tones, really different colors of red, in contra-distinction, 
to varying shades of the same. These small spottings gave 
snap to the scheme as a whole. 




CONVENTIONAL DECORATIONS 

No. 203— Sandwich Tray, Mrs. Leroy T. Steward, Chicago, Ifl. No. 237— Salad Bowl, Miss C. S. Scott, Kirwin, Kansas. 

No. 266— Flower Holder, Miss Eula McEIhenny, Dallas, Texas. No. 255— Electric Light Shade, Miss Gertrade Gilpin, Portland, Ind. 

No. 275— Comport, Mrs. W. J. Dixon, Kokomo, Ind. No. 312— B & C Tray, Miss M. E. Beede, Minneapolis, Minn. 

No. 270— Salad Bowl, Mrs. W. J. Dixon, Kokomo, Ind. No. 328— Whipped Cream Bowl, Mrs. M. A. Williams, Moncie, Ind. 

No. 273— Salad Bowl, Mrs. "W. J. Dixon, Kokomo, Ind. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



127 



One table was entirely devoted to Miss 
Peterson's work. Conspicuous j among the 
exhibits was a' chop plate with dandelion 
motive executed in natural colors, but soft- 
ened for decorative effect. A smaller plate 
in floral ornament, excellently planned and 
carefully executed. Her chocolate set and 
salad or fruit dish were also admirable ex- 
amples of workmanship. 

It will be interesting to the co-workers in 
this line to know that Kokoma has sent in 
a collective exhibit each year and also 
that while they have been prize winners in 
the past and received some distinction in this display, still 
possibly a little word to them against their lavish use of gold 
might be useful. 

Mr. Kastner of Milwaukee showed a unique decoration 
done in paste and colored golds which completely covered, in 
a most decorative manner, the panels of a large size water 
jug. The handle was ovide and presented a sufficient surface 
for some of the beautiful ornamentation that he used so gen- 
erously on the pitcher but it was gold covered. There were 
many other handles treated in this rather past-date way. 




MISTLETOE DESIGN FOR NUT BOWL— GEORGIA B. SPAINHOWER 



The critics of the present urge all ceramic artists to give the 
same study to the smaller spaces that they do to the main 
masses. The nose of the tea pot at the base, if needed; at 
the spout if so shaped or perhaps both; the covers, and by all 
means the handles. Do not cover them with gold if you can 
arrange any relative color scheme. So pronounced has this 
feeling become that none but the most tiny or slender handles 
are now being covered with gold, in fact all large surfaces of 
gold are being discouraged. Lack of space forbids mention 
of much other interesting work. 





DESIGNS OF MISTLETOE— ABBIE P. WALKER 



(Treatment page 112) 



i2S 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



TEAPOT, BLACK EYED SUSAN (Supplement) 

Henrietta Barclay Paist 

OUTLINE the design with Black or Finishing Brown. 
Tint the entire piece with Satsuma, Neutral Yellow, 
or some soft dull ivory mixture. Lay the handle on cover, 
the inside of large handle and inside of spout, with Roman 
Gold and fire. 

Second Fire — Oil and dust the foliage with Grey Green 
and the petals of flowers with any Deep Yellow, Egg, Silver 
etc. The tone underneath will keep from being too bright. 
The centers are of Finishing Brown with a touch of Hair Brown. 
Go over the Gold and fire. 

For third fire go over the outline and if the tones are 
uneven wash over with color to flatten. 

Details are shown on page 121. 



GOOD WORDS FROM A FRIEND OF THE "KERAMIC" 

Josephine G. Widdemer, of Albany, N. Y., writes: "The 
Keiamic Studio ceitainly grows in beauty and value. I look 
eagerly for it every month and I own every issue from Number 
one Volume one and would not part with any of them." 

As we are now in the midst of the 15th Volume, the above 
compliment is thoroughly appreciated by the publishers. Ker- 
amic Studio was founded by Adelaide Alsop Robineau in April 
1899 

STUDIO NOTE 

Miss Myrtle E. Murphy, of Los Angeles, Cal., has opened 
a studio at 1752 West 49th Street, where she will receive pu- 
pils for class or private instruction in conventional design 
china painting. 




HOLLY PLATE— MRS W, C. McDONOUGH 







TEA-POT-BLACK EYED SUSAN MOTI F-H EN Rl etta BARCLAY paist 



DECEMBER 1913 

SUPPLEMENT TO 

KERAMIC STUDIO 



COPYRIGHT 1913 
KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 

SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



129 





# 



MISTLETOE AND HOLLY— HALLIE DAY 



(Treatment page 112) 




HOLLY DESIGN FOR CUP AND SAUCER--GEORGIA B. SPAINHOWER 



130 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

(Continued from page 120) 

J. G. W. — How can so many colors be dusted on one design for the same 
firing without conflictingf I understand ordinary dusting perfectly, hut it seems 
impossible {for me) to accomplish perfect work with several colors dusted for 
the same firing. How is the color cleaned from the china and how is it put on 
without encroaching on other parts of the design? 

When dusting in several colors in one fire the oil is applied very thin 
without padding. Oil and dust one color at a time. Straighten the edges 
carefully after dusting with an orange stick and then the next oiling can be 
painted right up to the line without running into it just as you would paint 
in a color. 



L. M. V. — Will you kindly give me the correct proportions of Hand- 
cocks Hard, soft and m,edium enamel and Relief white used 1st on French and 
German, 2d on Salsuma and Belleekf 

For mixing enamels use 1 part Hancocks Hard White Enamel, 4 parts 
M. & H. Relief White, a touch of flux and whatever color you desire. Rub 
it through thoroughly without any medium and then use a thin quaUty of 
Lavender Compound for a medium. This same mixture can be used on 
BeUeek or Satsuma by using just a little more of the enamel or the same pro- 
portions can be used by using the medium enamel. 

Anxious — In making the "Acid etched Borders" ivhat is best to use in 
painting the design and the rest of the plate so the acid will not run and will eat 
only where you wajit it to? 

Use "Turpentine Asphaltum Varnish" as a resist for the acid work. 




FRUIT PLATE, APPLES— FLORENCE MILTON 



(Treatment by Jessie M. Bard) 



OUTER band, large leaf and two inner bands are Green 
Gold. Stem of the Apple and the 2d band from^edge 
are oiled and dusted with Bright Green, remainder of the de- 



sign except the apple is Dark Blue for dusting. Apple oiled 
and dusted with 2 pai;ts Yellow Red and 1 part Yellow Brown. 




f. B. AULICri'd 



WELL KNOWN 



Select Powder Colors for China 

The best Qaailty. Finely Ground. BRUSHES and MEDIUM For Sale by Leadini 

Art Stores. WATER COLOR STUDIES TO KENT. Mail Orders Promplly Fillei 

Send for Price List. 1104 AUDITORIUM TOWER, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS. 



Everything for Artists and China Painters 

You'll find here the best 
goods and a full assortment. 

Catalogs sent on request. 

MAKE YOUR BANDING 
EASY 

with "Arto" Banding Wheel 
It is self-centering and made better than ever. Every user is 
pleased with it. We also are selling agents for Revelation Kilns 
outside Cook Co., III. 
A. H. ABBOTT & CO., 127 North Wabash Avenue, Chicago 




Wilke Studio China Kiln 



FOR FIRING DECO- 
RATED CHIN 4, 
GLASS, ET( 



WRITE FOR 
CATALOGUE 




MANUFACTURED BY 

LAVELLE FOUNDRY CO., ANDERSON, IND., U. S. A. 



Copy for advertisements for the 
January number MUST be here by 
December 1 to insure insertion, 

Keramic Studio Pub. Co. 



I DelleeK CKina 
\ in Ne^w SKapes 
i of American 
I Design 




Our White China Department is now displaying a large vari- 
ety of New Articles in China for Decorating 

Your special attention is called to the large variety of American De- 
signed shapes in Belleek China. The surface is the most perfect of 
any ware made and many of the best decorators prefer to work on this 
ware. You will notice that the prices are lower in proportion for sizes 
and shapes than asked for either French, English or German. We 
illustrate and price three pieces. 
2 QT. PITCHER, $2 25 lOi INCH VASE, $2.00 

12 INCH TROPHY LOVING CUP, $4.00 
You will be delighted with the many artistic blanks contained in our stock and will 
find your best efforts most perfectly rewarded if you also use the reliable colors 
and supplies which are offered in this enlarged department of our new estabUsh- 

'"^"'' WRITE FOR PARTICULARS 



The Kinney & levan Co. 

1375-1385 Euclid Ave., CLEVELAND, 0., U. S. A. 



JESSIE LOUISE CLAPP 

511 McCarthy block, Syracuse, n. y. 

Manufacturer of 

"SYRACUSE" OUTLINING INK 

SOLD BY PROMINENT DEALERS ! 
Or direct. Large bottle 40 cts. Small bottle 25 cts. Post-paid 
"SPHINX" GOLD, 68 cts. postpaid. COOVER'S OUTLINES 

K. E. CHERRY'S COLORS— THE NEW "DUSTING COLORS 

in full size and half size vials. Send for price Hat. 

Sleeper's Crucible Gold, 67 cents, post-paid 

PER DOZEN, $7.36, POST PAID 
Unflnxed— Roman— Antique Green— Green-Red Bronze — SUver 

ASK YOUR DEALER FOR "SYRACUSE" OUTLINING INK 

HE WILL HAVE IT IF UP-TO-DATE 



IF YOU WISH TO 

BEGIN YOUR SUBSCRIPTION 

with the 

May 1913 Number 

of KERAMIC STUDIO (the &st of the 15th vol.) we have a 
few back numbers to date, but the quantity is limited 

DON'T HOLD YOUR ORDER TOO LOxNG 

Bound copies of Vol. 14 now on hand, $5.50 express paid 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUBUSHING CO. 
SYRACUSE, N. Y. 






i:-.;«-r;j tt^fvur'Jr.'^ttir-sm'^sri 



K. E. CHERRY 
CHINA COLORS 



...« .^. Price List of Standard and Dust- 
ing Colors in Standard Vials or Half Vials and 
in packages of 50 grammes (1 1-3 ounce); also 
Mediums for Fakting and Tinting and for 
Dusting. 

The colors for Dusting are beautiful glazes 
of soft and subdued tints, speciaUy selected for 
dusting work, and different from anything on 
the market. 

Send also for list of a few nice pieces of 
Satsuma and Sedji ware left over from our 
Summer School. Will sell them at low figures. 




n 



KE.CHEi 

China Colors 

YELLOW 

?0R DUSTING 



iDBWEAUPOTTEin 
snucusE,}yfi 



L 



THE ROBINEAU POTTERY 

SYRACUSE. N. Y. 



SLEEPER'S 
CRUCIBLE GOT D 

is the standard in the Field of C era: 

A Chemically Precipitated Gold of Extreme Smoothness 
and Unequalled Lustre 




Its superior quality, combine. solute protection 

afforded by SLEEPER'S PATENTED DUST AND MOIST- 
URE PROOF CONTAINER, is sufficient to recommend it 
to the most critical. 

A Perfect Gold That Will Stand the Severest Test 

China Decorators' Gold that possesses more commendable 
features than any similar article on the market— a pure, 
chemically precipitated gold of remarkable richness and 
lustre, insuring THAT perfect gold color so vitally important 
in ceramic art. 

■MARSHINGSV LIQUID BRIGHT GOLD 

OILS AND MEDIUMS FOR CHINA PAINTERS 

ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE ON REQUEST 

FAVOR, RUHL & CO. 

NEW YORK CHICAGO BOSTON 



Little Things To Make 

FOR some time past we have had in preparation the book entitled *'LittIe Things to Make" and it 
now appears that we will publish the same in December, early enough to be sent as a Christmas 
gift, bttt not soon enotigh for ceramic workers to take advantage of the designs for making 
Christmas Gifts. This book, however, w^ be acceptable any month in the year as a help in the making 
of little gifts, and the five inserts showing these designs in thd Original, colors, will be of great assistance 
to the china decorator, _ ' 

We hope that orders for this book will be sent to us at once so as to be fifled from the first ones pub- ■ 
lished which will be on or about December 1 5th (before that date if possible). Wegtiarantee satisfaction 
or money refunded. 

Five color inserts filled with designs and studies to be used on small pieces of china — besides a large 
number of unique designs in black and white for Pepper and Salts, Celery Dips, Toilet Sets, Bon-Bons, 
Bar Pins, Hat Pins, Tea Caddies, Small Pitchers, Ferneries, Pin Trays, Jewel Boxes, Mugs, Mustard 
Pots, Small Bowls, Sugar Shakers, Ointment Boxes, Syrup Jugs, Pins, Buttons, Medallions, Buckles, 
Almond Dishes, Biscuit Jars, Ramiquin, Talcum Shakers, Cold Cream Boxes, Belt and Lace Pins, 
Small Tea Sets, Tea Jars, Nut Bowls, Candlesticks, Rose Jars, Dresser Sets, etc., etc. 

PRICE, $2.50 POST-PAID 

SEND YOUR ORDER NOW FOR CHRISTMAS DiiLilUKY 

Keramic Studio Pub. Co., Syracuse, N. Y. 



\r^E^EL.l=> 



M 



F"| R^EL- Pl^L- 



CONTRIBUTORS 



JESSIE M. BARD 
HELEN BECKER 
MARY BURNETT 
CLARA L. CONNOR 
ALICE W. DONALDSON 
IDA C. FAILING 
KATE CLARK GREENE 
ALBERT W. HECKMAN 
MAY B» HOLSCHER 
FLORENCE A. HUNTINGTON 
MARGARET LATHAM 
KATHERINE W, LINDSEY 
ANNA V. LINGLEY 
MAUD M. MASON 
DORRIS D, MILLS 
O. E. MINER 
HANNAH B. OVERBECK 
LILLIE PETERSON 
M. PHILLIPS 
RUTH M. RUCK 
ALICE SEYMOUR 
EDNA MANN SHOVER 
MABELLE W. WELLS 
lONE LIBBY WHEELER 
C. L. WIARD 



JAN. MCMXIV Price 40c. Yearly Subscription $4.00 



The entire contents of this Magazine are covered by the general copyright, and the articles mast not be reprinted without special p^mission 



CONTENTS OF JANUARY, 1914 



Editorial Notes 

Newark Class in China Decoration 

Orchids (Stiisplement) 

Begonia 

Fernery, Bleeding Heart Motif 

Bowl Border in Horse Chestnuts 

Dinner Set 

C«p and Saucer 

Plate 

Anemone Virginia 

Japanese Anemone 

Cttp and Saacer and Plate 

Jardiniere, The Red Cock 

Anemone 

New Jersey Meadow Weed 

Bird Studies 

Fish Design for Plate 

Pitcher, Wild Aster 

Dogwood Blossoms 

Border 

Border 

Border 

Border 

Jar, with Tigers 

Tiger Tobacco Jar 

Exhibition of Chicago Art Association 

Finger Bowl 

Bowl Design 

Cap and Saacer 

Conventional Border 



Maad M. Mason 
Helen Becker 
Hannah B. Overbeck 
Clara L. Connor 
Dorris D. Mills 
Albert W. Heckman 
Anna V. Lingley 
Anna V. Lingley 
Hannah B. Overbeck 
C. L. Wiard 
Lillie Peterson 
Hannah B. Overbeck 
Mary Burnett 
Alice W. Donaldson 
Edna Mann Shover 
May B, Holscher 
Alice Seymour 
M. Phillips 
Ida C. Failing 
Ruth M. Ruck 
Margaret Latham 
Clara L. Connor 
Katherine W. Lindsey 
Florence A. Huntington 
lone Libby Wheeler 
Ida C. Failing 
MabefleK. Wells 
O. E. Miner 
Kate Qark Greene 



Page 
131 

132 
132 
J33 
134 
134 

135-136 
136 
137 
138 
139 
140 
I4J 
142 
143 
144 
145 
146 
147 
148 
H8 
148 
148 
148 
149 

I50-I5J 
150 
152 
153 
153 



/6 9i 

THE OLD RELIABLE iOEm FITCH KILNS 




The thousands of these Kilns in use testify to 
their Good Qualities 



THE ORIGINAL PORTABLE KILN 



INEXPENSIVE TO BUY 
COST LITTLE TO OPERATE 




■e 



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STEARNS, FITCH & CO., SPRINGFIELD, OHIO 



Sf 



Vol. XV. No. 9. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



Janaary J9I4 




^NY, many times have the editor 
and pubUshers of Keramic Studio 
talked over plans for improving the 
Magazine and many are the times 
we have sighed and said: "if only we 
could increase the circulation suffi- 
ciently to warrant it." But that 
circulation, while healthy enough 
to keep us in bread and butter, 
has not reached the point where we can 
afford the improvements we have in mind. It is sat- 
isfactory to the advertiser who gets good returns for his 
advertisements, but the subscription list itself remains at a 
point where one would think that the number of china decor- 
ators in the United States was very limited, and where it would 
be suicidal to spend more money in improvements of the Maga- 
zine. The reason for this discrepancy, as we will explain 
further on, lies in the fact that each issue is read by five or six 
times more readers than there are subscribers. 

Now one of the things we want most to do, and we can do 
it if we succeed in increasing the subscription list some 
two thousand names above our average, is to give every month 
two color supplements, one naturalistic, one conventional. 

China decoration is on the increase, and there is no valid 
reason why Keramic Studio should not have a ten to fifteen 
thousand circulation at the very least, and if we could have 
that, many are the improvements we could give, besides the 
double color supplement. But there are reasons why the 
list remains below these figures — and many letters in our daily 
con-espondence repeat the tale. 

In the first place, many content themselves with reading 
it and tracing the designs at the public library. We have 
seen copies of each issue absolutely worn to rags from use in 
libraries and in large art schools. Of course there are china 
decorators who are too poor, not only in pocket but also in 
work, to subscribe $1.00 every three months, or should we say 
too poor in pocket because so poor in work, or shall we say, 
so poor in pocket and work because so short sighted as to 
think they can get all the inspiration and help they need by 
poring over Keramic Studio once a month at the library in- 
stead of owning their own copy. 

But the china decorator who is going to amount to some- 
thing is the one who appreciates the value of instruction and 
is willing to stint herself in some other way in order to have 
that instruction in the best way and the most useful form. 
Such a decorator should have her owoi file of Keramic Studio 
because it is the only publication that can keep her in touch 
with every new movement. It is the only ceramic monthly 
publication for the china decorator and by keeping her file 
for daily reference, she can refresh her memory on the things 
she wishes to try. She can make careful tracings of the 
studies she wishes to use and keep them in a filing cabinet or 
boxes, all of a kind together ready for instant reference. Some 
things that appear too difficult on first sight, after repeated 
studying appeal to her as just the things she wants most to 
do. It is like reading a foreign language, at first sight, it is 
hardly understandable, at the second glance it begins to mean 
something; a third reading and the meaning and beauty of 



the passage becomes clear. So to these china decorators 
who see Keramic Studio only at the library we would say, for 
your own sakes, if not for ours, own your copy. But to each 
of our readers who really appreciate what they are getting we 
would say "You owe it to us who work so hard to give you 
everything helpful we possibly can. Don't you think you 
owe it to us to pay foryourowncopy?andif you want to see the 
good work go on won't you urge every one else to do the same?" 

A number of teachers who ought to know better because 
they have to work to live just as we do, write as did a good 
friend the other day, thanking us for calling attention to our 
club offers but saying that her pupils had no interest to sub- 
scribe as they could use her copy in the studio. She forgets 
that in this way her own file will be ruined for future reference 
as well as that, to be a conscientious teacher, she should urge 
them to work at home as well as in class so that they will do 
her credit. An exhibition of student's work and the testi- 
mony of the student herself who goes about saying what a 

fine teacher Miss is because she makes her pupils 

so independent and able to help themselves at home, these 
are the very best advertisements a teacher can have and she 
will lose nothing in the price of lessons — for as her reputation 
increases, the more students she will have and the higher 
price she can ask. So here too is a case of short sightedness 
in not hustling to get up a club amxong her pupils and thereby 
not only gaining the premium, but adding to her own reputation. 

Then there is another type of teacher, of whom we hear from 
time to time, but thankful to say these are not so abundant; 
who use designs from Keramic Studio but carefully keep the 
magazine out of sight so that their pupils may not know the 
source of their inspiration. These are the most short sighted 
of all, for one of these days, one of these pupils, or may be 
more, will find out the source in some other way, and then they 
will lose all credit for anything they have done no matter how 
original or sincerely worked out, and in the meantime all of 
these short sighted folk are cheating themselves out of two 
color supplements a month, for we cannot pay for the extra 
study on the present basis, but if they will hustle themselves 
and raise our subscription list a little higher than it has been so 
far, they will not be long in receiving that added help regularly. 

Finally — dear ceramic family and loyal friends — you, 
who appreciate Keramic Studio and the good work it has 
done and is doing — wont you show your spirit of loyalty this 
New Year by doing what you can to work for Keramic Studio 
and get new subscriptions? You will not find us unappre- 
ciative — not only will you receive the club premiums, but if 
we get the additional subscriptions before the May anniver- 
sary number is out, you will begin at that exact date to receive 
two color supplements to content your hearts and we won't 
forget you either. There are other benefits to come. 

In this number we give illustrations of the work shown by 
the Chicago Ceramic Association, and we expect to soon give 
an account of the December exhibit of the New York Society. 
Photographs of interesting exhibi^ons ai-e always valuable 
material for Keramic Studio readers, provided the photographs 
are good and clear and show well the designs. 



132 



KERAMICj STUDIO 




NEWARK CLASS IN CHINA DECORATION 

Maud M. Mason 
I am sending you a group of photographs of some work 
done in my class in the Industrial School in Newark last 
year. It was a most interesting experience on my part at 
least, to teach our work, design and its application to ceramics, 
in a large class of this kind where the instruction had neces- 
sarily to be in a great measure of a general character. There 
were forty-five pupils registered in the class so you can imagine 
what a busy time I had. The result was most satisfactory, 
however, as a beginning to myself and the school also. I was 
prevailed upon to take it up again this year although I had 
decided to undertake other 
work instead — and have a larger 
class than last year with nearly 
all of the old ones back — prefer- 
ence being given to former stu- 
dents. I find that Newark is a 
most progressive place and a 
pioneer in many directions and 
the school tells me that this is 
the first class in overglaze cer- 
amics introduced into an in- 
dustrial art school in the coun- 
try. It is under the direction of 

the Board of Education and I was delighted to get an entering 
wedge into schools of this class, as I felt that our greatest 
hope in the growth artistically in ceramics will be due to the 
right teaching in big schools of this kind. It has been a source 
of much pleasure and satisfaction to me and I felt sure you 
would be interested in this work. Let us hope that all other 
schools throughout the country will become interested in 
introducing a ceramic department also. 
[Reproductions of the photographs all shown on this page. — Ed.] 

PLATE (Page 137) 

Anna V. Lingley 

OIL bands, all but the small square in the broken band, 
the lower part of the open triangular design and the 
upper part of the solid triangle and dust with Water Green 




No. 2. Oil the remaining parts of the two triangular figures 
and dust with Florentine Green. Oil the remaining parts of 
design and dust with Deep Ivory. 

ORCHIDS (Supplement) HELEN BECKER 

Treatment hy Jessie M. Bard 

LIGHTEST tone in blossom is Violet and a httle Deep 
Blue Green, shaded with Violet, ? very little dark Pur- 
ple and Banding Blue. Light purple tones are Ruby and a 
little Violet and the darker tones are Ruby and a very little 
Black. Yellow tone is Albert Yellow shaded with Yellow 

Brown. Outline in Black. 
Stems, Auburn or Dark Brown 
with a little Yellow for the lights. 
Leaves, Moss Green and a little 
Yellow Green for the lightest 
tone with a little Brown Green 
added for the darker tone and 
Shading Green added to that 
for the very darkest. Back- 
ground, Pearl Grey and a little 
A^iolet and Yellow for the light- 
est tone and a little Copenhagen 
Blue for the darker tone. 

BEGONIA (Page 133) 

Hannah B. Overheck 

OIL the leaves and dust with Glaze for Green. The stems 
are oiled and dusted with Mode, then the blossoms are 
oiled and dusted with Rose. Second Fire — Oil the background 
and dust with Glaze for Green, clean out the flowers then fire. 
Next firing — Oil the leaves and dust with Florentine 
Green, then clean out the veins and then shade the blossoms 
with Rose and a little Mode. 

CUP AND SAUCER (Page 136) 

Anna V. Lingley 

PAINT all the design in Gold except the small square and 
the figure above it, these are painted with 2 parts Yel- 
low Green, 1 part Apple Green, use the color rather thin and 
paint it rather hea\^^ using a flowing motion. 




ORCHID CATLEYA TRIANAE" HELEN BECKER 



JANUARY 1914 

SUPPLEMENT TO 

KERAMIC STUDIO 



KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 
SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



.h 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



J33 




BEGONIA— HANNAH B. OVERBECK 



(Treatment page 132) 



134 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




FERNERY, BLEEDING HEART MOTIF— CLARA L. CONNOR 



OUTLINE in Dark Grey and Blood Red equal parts. 
Second Fire — Oil dark space at the top and dust with 
3 Pearl Grey, 1 Apple Green, 1 Shading Green, 2 Grey for 
Flesh or Dark Grey. Oil leaves and stems and dust with 2 
Yellow Green, 1 Violet, 3 Pearl Grey, 1 Ivory Glaze. Oil 
flowers and dust with 2 Yellow Red and 1 Yellow Brown. 
Oil background and dust with Pearl Grey and a very little 
Apple Green. 

DINNER SET (Pages 135, 136) 

Albert. W. Heckman 

FOR the outer bands and connecting lines use Yellow Green. 
Greywithatouchof Blacktotonedownthegreen. For the 
flower forms and stems use two parts Pearl Grey and one part 
Violet No. 2. If one may have a preference for a certain color 
on their dinner set it may be used in place of the violet. The 



small dots in the center of the flower forms are a Bright Yellow. 
The design for this set looks equally well when painted 
with gold or green gold over china that has been tinted a delicate 
cream color. Add a bit of bright color for the small dots and 
center upright stem and also insert a thin hair line of color 
between the double connecting lines. 

BOWL BORDER IN HORSE CHESTNUTS 

Dorris D. Mills 

TINT lower part of bowl Light Yellow Brown, border same, 
shade darker. Leaves Olive Green with a touch of 
Auburn Brown. Nuts Auburn Brown. Spots Blood Red 
with a touch of Auburn Brown. Nuts outlined in Gold, 
rest outlined in Dark Brown. Band at top same as leaves. 
Design can be all outlined in Gold or Black. Line bowl with 
Yellow Brown Lustre. 




BOWL BORDER IN HORSE CHESTNUTS— DORRIS D. MILLS 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



135 





DINNER SET— ALBERT W. HECKMAN 



(Treatment pages 134 and 136) 



136 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




DINNER SET— ALBERT W. HECKMAN 



(Treatment by Jessie M. Bard) 



PAINT all the design with Green Gold, except the spots 
in center of flowers and the center vertical lines; these 
are painted with 2 parts Yellow Green and 1 part Apple Green, 
also paint a narrow line of the Green between the two hori- 
zontal lines. A thin wash of Yellow Lustre or a soft yellow 
tint may be added between the design and the edge of plate. 

TREATMENT No. 2 

Flowers and buds in Silver or White Gold. Remainder 
of design in Green Gold. Small spots in flowers and buds, 
2 parts Banding Blue, 1 part Copenhagen Blue. Space be- 
tween design and edge of plate in Pearl Grey and a little Deep 
Blue Green. 



TREATMENT No. 3 

Oil flowers, center vertical stem, line and the small bar 
under the stems and dust with Mode. Oil remainder of de- 
sign and dust with 3 parts Florentine Green and 1 part Bright 
Green. Oil band between design and edge of plate and dust 
with 2 parts Ivory Glaze and 1 part Florentine Green. Paint 
small spots in flowers and buds with Albert Yellow and Yellow 
Brown. 

This design may also be etched. Paint the asphaltum 
over entire design and over all the background leaving a nar- 
row space half the width of the stems all around the design. 
Treatment No 1 and 2 may be used for the coloring. 




CUP AND SAUCER— ANNA V. LINGLEY 



(Treatment page 132) 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



137 



^ 



m 



w 







138 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




O^ 



JAPANESE ANEMONE (Page 139) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 
OUTLINE in Black. Blossoms are left white and shaded 
with Brown Green and Yellow with a little Violet added 
for the deeper shadows. Center of blossom is Yellow Green 
and Moss Green shaded with Brown Green and a little Shad- 
ing Green. Paint a yellow wash over the stamen with Yellow 
Brown and Yellow. Stems and leaves are Apple Green and 
a little Moss Green for the lightest tones with a little Brown 
Green added for the middle tone and Shading Green and a 
little Grey and Brown Green for the darkest tone. Back- 
ground Deep Blue Green and a little Yellow for the lightest 
tone, shaded to Deep Blue Green and Sea Green. Darkest 
tone Shading Green, Moss Green and a little Brown Green. 

ANEMONE (Page 142) 

Mary Burnett 

PAINT leaves with Yellow Green and Shading Green for 
dark in leaves and the lights are Apple Green and Yellow 
for Painting. The stems are Yellow Green and Mauve. 
The flowers are Rose. The centers are Yellow for Painting 
and Yellow Brown. 

JARDINIERE (Page 141) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

OIL entire surface of jardiniere and dust with 1 part Grey 
Yellow and 3 parts Pearl Grey. Second Fire — Oil all 
darkest tone and dust with 3 Pearl Grey, 1 Apple Green. 
Oil darkest grey tone which forms the cock, and dust with 3 
Pearl Grey, 1 Yellow Brown and 1 Blood Red. Oil the darker 
grey background tone and dust with 1 Pearl Grey, 1 Dark 
Grey or Grey for Flesh, 2 Yellow Brown. If an outline is 
desired use 2 Dark Grey and 1 Blood Red. 



ANEMONE VIRGINIANA— HANNAH B, OVERBECK 




Anemone nryi 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



139 



I 



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o 
w 
n 



> 










140 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




-/ 



OUTLINE with Dark Grey or Grey for Flesh. 
Second Fire — Oil the flower and the wide 
band above it and dust with 3 parts Yellow Brown, 
i Albert Yellow, 1 Ivory Glaze. Oil remainder of 
design and dust with 3 Pearl Grey, 1 Moss Green, 
i Albert Yellow. 

Third Fire — Oil over entire surface and dust 
with 3 parts Ivory Glaze, 1 Pearl Grey, a very 
little Yellow Brown. 





CUP AND SAUCER AND PLATE— LILLIE PETERSON 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



141 



> 



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w 

H 

w 

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w 
o 

n 
o 
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w 

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w 

W 

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142 



KERAMIC STUDIO 





m'W 



ANEMONE— MARY BURNETT 



(Treatment page 138) 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



J43 




NEW JERSEY MEADOW WEED— ALICE W. DONALDSON 



Flowers pale Yellow, under sides of petals much dai'ker. Stamens bright Yellow. Pistil, light Blue Green. Seed pods and 
under sides of leaves, light Yellow Green. Leaves, Sage Green. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




BIRD STUDIES— EDNA MANN SHOVER 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



H5 




FISH DESIGN FOR PLATE— MAY B. HOLSCHER 



(Treatment by Jessie M. Bard) 



OUTLINE with 1 part Black and 2 parts Banding Blue. 
Second Fii-e — Oil the outer band, the dark spaces at 
the end of the wave and dust with 1 part Banding Blue, 
1 Aztec Blue, 1 Dark Grey or Grey for Flesh. Oil all the re- 
maining darkest tones and dust with 1 Banding Blue, 1 Aztec 
Blue, 2 Pearl Grey, then use this same mixture and add 2 
parts Ivory Glaze and dust the backgi'ound back of fish with 



it. Oil the leaves and dust with 3 parts Pearl Grey, 1 Apple 
Green, 1 Shading Green, 1 Dark Grey or Grey for Flesh. Oil 
the light part of wave and the light space in the inner narrow 
border and dust with Glaze for Blue. Oil the fish and the 
center of plate and dust with 4 Ivory Glaze, 1 Pearl Grey, 1 
Yellow Brown. Oil light space in the eye and the mouth and 
dust with 1 part Yellow Bro^vn and ^ part Dark Brown. 



J46 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




PITCHER, WILD ASTERS— ALICE SEYMOUR 



PAINT the light flowers with a very thin wash of Deep 
Blue Green and a little Sea Green and shaded with the 
same colors applied a little heavier. Center of flower is Al- 
bert Yellow for the light shaded with Yellow Brown. Darker 
flowers add Banding Blue for the hghts and Royal Purple 
for the darkest touches. Yellow Brown and Dark Brown 
for the centers, Violet and Deep Blue Green for the shadow 



blossoms. Stems are Moss Green and a little Deep Blue 
Green. Dark bands are Gold. Wide band at the top and 
bottom are Banding Blue and a little Moss Green. The two 
narrow light bands are Deep Blue Green and a little Moss 
Green. 

The color through center of pitcher is a thin wash of 
2 parts Yellow Brown and 1 part Yellow Green. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



J47 




DOGWOOD^BLOSSOMS— M. PHILLIPS 



(Treatment page 148) 



148 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




BORDER— IDA C, FAILING 

BANDS are gold. Paint roses with Old Rose or a thin 
wash of Blood Red, use the color a little heavier for the 
dark center. Outline with Blood Red and just a touch of 
Violet. Paint leaves with Moss Green and a little Grey For 
Flesh and outline then with Grey For Flesh and a little Shad- 
ing Green. 

DOGWOOD (Page 147) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

PAINT a very thin wash of Blood Red over the pink tips 
of the blossoms, Albert Yellow and a very little Brown 
Green for yellow tones, Violet and a little Yellow for the 
cool shadows and Brown Green and a little Yellow for the 
warm shadows. Leaves, Moss Green and a httle Dark Grey 
shaded with Brown Green. Stems, Brown Green and Yellow 
and a little Yellow Brown added in the shadows. Background 
2 parts Pearl Grey, 1 part Dark Grey and a little Yellow Brown 
Shadow blossoms in background are Violet and a little Copen- 
hagen Blue. 



BORDER— RUTH M. RUCK 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

OIL the background, or if the design is used for a bowl, 
oil over the entire surface and dust with 3 parts Pearl 
Grey, 1 part Ivory glaze and a touch of Shading Green. 

Second Fire — Oil all parts of the design and dust with 
Water Green No. 2 and outline with Black. 



h 4'% l§ 

r \ ^ \ r 

BORDER— MARGARET LATHAM 




BORDER CLARA L. CONNOR 




JAR WITH TIGERS— KATHERINE W. LINDSEY (Treatment by Jessie M. Bard) 



OIL over entire surface and dust with 4 Ivory Glaze, 1 
Grey Yellow, 1 Yellow Brown. Second Fire — Oil 
dark in tigers and dust with 1 Yellow Brown, 1 Dark Brown, 
1 Dark Grey or Grey for Flesh. Oil all other dark tones in 
design and dust with i Yellow Brown, 1 part Dark Brown or 



Auburn Brown. Oil the large light tones and the dark gi-ey 
ground and dust with 2 Pearl Grey and 1 Yellow Brown. Oil 
the sky, foreground and small light tones and dust with the 
same coloring as for first fire. Oil the flowers and dust 
with 1 Yellow Red and 1 Yellow Brown. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



i49 




Treatment by Florence A. Huntington 

TINT entire jar with brown and wipe out the path around 
trees and band at top of jar also the monogram on cover. 
Second firing make tigers trees, and circle back of monogram, 
two tones depeer. Fill path with gold and outline with Black. 



TIGER TOBACCO JAR— FLORENCE A. HUNTINGTON 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

THE background, back of tiger and all of the design except 
the tigers in Gold. Second Fire — Oil the tigers and dust 
with 2 Ivory Glaze, 1 Yellow Brown. Oil all other unpainted 



spaces and dust with 1 Grey Yellow and 3 Ivory Glaze. 



150 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



EXHIBIT OF CHICAGO CERAMIC ASSOCIATION 

lone Libby Wheeler 

THE twenty-first annual exhibition of the Chicago Ceramic 
Art Association was held at the Art Institute from 
October 7 to 31, practically all phases of overglaze decoration 
being included in the display. 

An appreciation of the correct handling and decoration 
with regard to harmonious design, color and forms was evi- 
dent in nearly all of the work. Many examples were dis- 
played of the skilful handling of enamels in subdued tones 
and beautifully blended colorings. 

"In all the crafts the simplest effects often require much 
technical knowledge. The old Chinese vases are nothing but 
form and color, but their simplicity is the expression of the 
most consummate skill in the potters' craft the world has 
ever known." In modern work the same principle is often 
followed in the application of lustre to interesting shapes, 
depending entirely upon the decorative quality of the varying 
tones of color, shading from light to dark. 

In this display a fine discrimination in the choice of shapes 
was evident. Thirty-five pieces of lustre, varying from the 
copper lustre of "ye olden times" to the brilliant nasturtium, 
soft greens and shell pinks, showed how much gi'eater is the 
variety of coloring in m.odern lustre than in the antique. 
There is no other medium in which the variety of metallic 
tints and the iridescent hues of the peacock can be so faith- 
fully reproduced. 

Miss Marie Bohmann has gained some very interesting 
effects with lustre, her "nasturtium-bowl" and small ruby 
vase being especially good. Miss Tilla Booth had some un- 
usual lustre pieces and also showed a plate and bowl of very 
dainty coloring. A departure from the beaten track of con- 
ventional work was Miss B. S. Browers' quaint tea-set of period 
decoration; it seemed like an echo from our grandmother's 
time. The ornament was cleverly adapted to the shapes 
and strong in color. Mrs. Anna V. Cornish was represented 
by two very attractive vases with interesting designs in Roman 
and Green Gold on nasturtium-lustre ground. A cup and 
saucer from the Persian and a large vase very rich in color 
and well designed was the work of Miss Amanda B. Edwards. 

The prize offered by A. H. Abbott for the best vase was 
deservedly won by Miss Mary E. Hippie. The decoration 
was a thoroughly original design from the narcissus, worked 
out in gold, silver and lustre. Among other good pieces, this 
artist showed a tea-set with violet motif, a large bowl in rich 
deep coloring and a dainty basket with design in white gold. 

The six pieces of a dinner set offered by Mrs. Isabelle 
Kissinger were given the Burley & Co. and Hasburg prizes. 
Technically, it was as correct as a piece of ceramic art could 
well be, the design being skilfully adapted to the varying 



shapes. Some good lustre and enamel work and several 
interesting pieces using the violet m.otif complete this artist's 
showing. A beautifully executed salad bowl in subdued tones 
of grey, dull reds and blues with touches of gold, was the 
work of Mrs. Myrtle E. Lidberg. Another entry by the same 
artist was a bowl and plate with a color scheme of gi-een, orange 
and grey. 

A tea-set of six pieces with an interesting design skil- 
fully applied in pink and gold, was the work of Miss Bertha 
L. Lockwood; she also showed a mayonaise bowl and a vase 
with a design of pond lilies in gold and green lustre. Mrs. 
Maud Myers offered a set of plates in geometric design of 
green and gold. She also showed a stein and a large Sat- 
suma vase in enamels wonderfully rich in color. Mrs. Ralph 
Park displayed a vase with a gourd design in soft greys, greens 
and touches of subdued red on a green lustre ground, the 
paint cleverly blended in with the lustre. A dainty Satsuma 
box in enamel and a service plate completed her exhibit. 

In the competition for the Sleeper Gold and Wheeler 
Lustre prizes, Mrs. Rena 0. Petterson, a new exhibitor, re- 
ceived the award for a charming vase. This piece showed 
the artist's appreciation of the subtle and elusive quality of 
the lustre and a skilful handling of the gold. A Satsuma 
jar in green and lavender, a quaint tea-set, several excellent 
examples of enamel work and two interesting sets of table 
ware completed this showing. Miss Aurora S. Pierce's en- 
tries were all lustre pieces, a pitcher shaped vase in iniby 
lustre showed effects like Tiffany glass. A dull green tea 
caddy resembling a piece of Chinese Jade ware, a delicate 
shell like pink vase and a large vase in gi-eenish gold tones 
made an interesting variety. Mi-s Louise A. Rees, another 
new exhibitor, presented a plate, cup and saucer with a quaint 
and pleasing violet design. Mrs. Rood's collection comprised 
a bowl interesting in design and strong in color, a dresser set 
in crisp blues, greens, and pinks, a lustre vase in green and 
gold, a set of chocolate cups in warm tones of brown and gold. 

The F. B. Aulich and Hasburg prizes were received by 
Mrs. Abbie Pope Walker for a veiy attractive punch bowl 
in enamels and gold, good in the design, accurate drawing, 
and confident handling of the enamels. A placque in soft 
tones of grey, pink and gi'een without outhne was skilfully 
executed. A nut set in copper lustre with gold lining was 
very pleasing, also a claret pitcher in a harmonious color 
scheme of orange and green lustre, gold gi'ound, bands of 
red gold and mat brown green base. Several Satsuma pieces 
in enamels completed her fist. 

The writer exhibited a number of lustre pieces, a three 
piece Satsuma tea-set, a syrup jug and plate and a service 
plate in etched gold. The latter piece was awarded a Has- 
burg prize. 




FINGER BOWL— IDA C. FAILING 



Trace design in outline with Grey For Flesh and fire. Second Fii-e— Dust dark with W^ater Lily Green. Light places with 

Glaze for Green, the white squares are Green Gold. If a background is desired give another firing 

and paint it in with Apple Green and Lemon Yellow very delicately. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



t5t 




Mrs. Kissinger 



Mrs. Cornish 



Miss Bohman Mrs. Park Mrs. Rood Miss Brown 

Mrs. Cornish 
Miss Hippie Mrs. Peterson Mrs. Park 




Miss Booth Mrs. Rood Mrs. Myers 

Miss Pierce Mrs. Edwards Miss Lockwood 







Mrs. Hippie 

Mrs. Peterson 
Mrs. Wheeler 
Mrs. Kissinger 



PRIZE GROUP 

Mrs. Walker 

Mrs. Kissinger 



Miss Bohman Miss Booth Miss Edwards Mrs. Lidberg Mrs. Rees 




Miss lone Wheeler Mrs. Walker 

EXHIBITION OF CHICAGO CERAMIC ASSOCIATION 



152 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




BOWL DESIGN— MABELLE K. WELLS 

Outline design in Black. Paint in dark parts with Gold ; light parts with Silver. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



153 




. CUP AND SAUCER— O. E. MINER 

The bands and the square formed flower are Green Gold, also the outlines of small flowers and leaves. Paint the small flowers 
with Deep Blue Green and a little Sea Green and the leaves with Apple Green and a little Moss Green. 




CONVENTIONAL BORDER— KATE CLARK GREENE 

Outline design and fire. Then oil and dust design with 2 parts Grey for Flesh, 1 part Yellow Brown and 4 parts Pearl Grey. 



154 



KERAMIC STUDIO 






MiSS!>:$SSSSSSSSsK 



K^SSS®SSSSSSS$JS 



SLEEPER'S CRUCIBLE GOLD 

The Most Important Link Connecting 
the Next Two Greatest Factors Necessary 
to Success in the Field of Ceramic Art 




AMBITION 



v____y V 



MANY A COMPETENT JUDGE HAS SAID: 

*'The execution on that piece of work is perfect— but it 
has been spoiled by the use of a cheap, inferior gold." 

When 

SLEEPER'S CRUCIBLE GOLD 

is used that verdict is never rendered 

It's a RICH, PURE, BRILLIANT GOLD that Stands Out 
Conspicuously Prominent Amid the Strongest Competition 

Manufactured by 

FRED L. SLEEPER 

950 Diversey Parkway 

CHICAGO 



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CONTENTS OF FEBRUARY, 1914 



Editorial Notes 

Conventional Designs (Sttpplement) 

Phlox 

Fo«r Winds Sammer School Designs 

Phlox 

Medallions, Phlox Motif 

Garden Motifs 

Chrysanthemams 

Grapes 

Adaptation of Flower Motif to Different Spaces 

Adaptation of Flower Motif to Different Spaces 

Adaptation of Flower Motif to different Spaces 

Evening Primrose 

Answers to Correspondents 

Flower and Fruit Motifs 

Flower and Fruit Motifs 

Acorns 

Cobaea 

Designs from Four Winds Summer School 





Page 




155 




155-157 


Elise Talfy 


156 




I58-I60-I64-I65 


Alice W. Morse 


159 


Mrs. A. B. Smith 


161 


Elsie Tally 


J6I 


Russell Goodwin 


162 


Jeanne M. Stewart 


163 


Ruth Johnson 


264 


J. Jackson 


165 


Myrtle McCoy and Alice Morse 


166-167 


Hannah B. Overbeck 


168-169 




168 


Ruth Johnson and Florence Gough 


I70-I7I 


Alice Morse Elise Tally 


172-173 


M. Burnett 


174 


Dorothy Putzki 


175 




176-177 



i6 d\ 

THE OLD RELIABLE i^im FITCH KILNS 



The thousands of these Kilns in use testify to 
their Good Qualities 




THE ORIGINAL PORTABLE KILN 



INEXPENSIVE TO BUY 
COST LITTLE TO OPERATE 



The only fuels which give perfect results in 
Glaze and Color Tone 




Size 14 X 12 in $30.00 

Size 16 X 19 in 40.00 

WRITE FOR DISCOUNTS* 



Gas Kiln 2 sizes 



«- 



STEARNS, FITCH & CO., 



!No. I Size 10 X 12 in $15.00 

No. 2 Size 16 x 12 in 20.00 

No. 3 Size J6 x 15 in 25.00 

No. 4 Size 18 x 26 in. 50.00 

Springfield, Ohio 



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CONVENTIONAL DESIGNS FROM FOUR WINDS POTTERY SUMMER SCHOOL 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 



FEBRUARY 1914 
SUPPLEMENT TO 

KERAMIC STUDIO 



Vol. XV. No. 10. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



Fcbrtiary 19 H 




E are devoting this issue of Keramic 
Studio to the work of the ceramic 
design class of the Four Winds Sum- 
mer School under Mrs. Kathryn 
Cherry. We present it to our stu- 
dents confident that they will find 
it abounding in useful material; all 
the designs having been made under 
the inspiration and with the correc- 
tion of the teacher, they can be used 
with as perfect confidence as if made by Mrs. Cherry herself. 
Some of the other pupils not being able to attend the full six 
weeks, we were unable to secure specimens of their work but 
we consider that we have a very representative lot. Among 
those whose work we missed was Mr. Albert Heckman, who 
has been a correspondence pupil of Mrs. Cherry's for some 
time, but his fine work is well known by all our students. 

For the benefit of those who have not yet reached the 
point where they know how to use the material presented 
to them, the following suggestions are made. The rectangu- 
lar panels can be used on square boxes or trays, or repeated 
on cylindrical shapes. They can be arranged without the 
enclosing lines to make repeated borders or medallions placed 
on opposite or three sides of a bowl or vase, finishing the edge 
with color bands alone or broken at intervals by a single 
blossom. They can also be adapted to tiles. The round 
medallions can be used for tops of boxes, centers of bowls or 
without the lines, used as medallions on the outsides of vases 
or bowls. The odd "flower motifs" can be used in the same 
way, or made into borders by using connecting or enclosing 
lines. The same thing can be done with the garden motifs 
and the motifs from the all over patterns. Very handsome 
jars can be made by using the allover, adapting it to a simple 
shape. Any desired color scheme can be used beside those 
given in the supplement. The designs are all finer in the 
dusting colors, but your own colors may be made to approxi- 
mate the effect. The borders are suitable for bowls, plates 
or cups and saucers or other shapes, by varying the width of 
the border to be in good proportion to the articles decorated. 
Any one with a little ingenuity can make new and interesting 
arrangements to suit whatever shape is chosen. 

A good plan in choosing a color scheme is to make several 
tracings of the design to be used and fill these in with various 
colors till a harmonious combination is found. Do not be 
afraid to try all. sorts of colors bright as well as dull. We 
are too much inclined to stick to the old and hackneyed color 
combinations. Some very brilliant colors may be used with 
charming effect, especially the in the garden motifs. A bright 
soft apple green, with a brilliant purple blue and a touch of 
orange or bits of scarlet and orange with a bluish purple and 
a rich pui'e green, or if the taste runs to more subdued effects, 
the grayed tones of Mrs. Cherry's own dusting colors are 
very charming and always just right. Many of the bolder 
flower motifs ai'e extremely effective in etched gold, using 
two or three colors of gold or silver with a soft lustre and a 
bit of brilliant color or enamel. Most of these designs however, 
were carried out in dusted color and soft effects, enamel 



and gold being reserved for the daintier pieces such as the 
Satsuma boxes and jars. The ground motif was used mostly 
with heavily dusted black outlines, filled in with gold or silver 
lines and soft tints of lustre. The designs which were executed 
on Sedji ware were usually in silver and fiat enamels. The 
colors are dusted one at a time and edges thoroughly cleaned 
before another color is applied, in this way almost all the color 
can be laid in at one fire, giving an opportunity for strengthen- 
ing and retouching in a succeeding fire. 

CONVENTIONAL DESIGNS (Stjpplement) 

(From Four Winds Summer School) 

Treatments by Jessie M. Bard 
Left Hand Row, Top to Bottom 

A. W. M. — Oil entire space and dust with three parts Dove 
Grey and one part Warm Grey. Second Fire — Oil darkest 
spaces and dust with Dark Blue for Dusting. Oil light blue 
spaces and dust with Grey Blue. 

E. T. — Oil entire surface and dust with three parts Ivory 
Glaze, one Pearl Grey, two Deep Ivory. Second Fire — Oil 
darkest tone and dust with Mode. Oil the bright gi-een spaces 
and dust with Bright Green. Oil yellow spaces and dust 
with Albert Yellow. 

E. T. — Oil over entire surface and dust with three Ivory 
Glaze, one Albert Yellow, one Yellow Brown. Oil darkest 
tones and dust with five parts Black and one part Mode. 
Oil green spaces and dust with Bright Green, lavender spaces 
with Mode and red spaces with Yellow Red. 

M. M. — Oil entire surface and dust with Dove Grey and a 
httle Deep Ivory. Second Fire — Oil dark green and dust with 
equal parts Dove Grey and Bright Green. The light green is 
equal parts of Ivory Glaze and Bright Green. The blue is 
Dark Blue for Dusting. Oil the flowers and buds and dust 
with same color as in first fire using a little more Deep Ivory. 
Centre Row, Top to Bottom 

E. T. — Oil darkest tones and dust with Black, the blue is 
Dark Blue for Dusting, the grey green is two parts Water 
Green No. 2 and one part Warm Grey. Yellow tone is Deep 
Ivory and a little Yellow Red. Second Fire — Oil over entire 
surface and dust with equal parts Dove Grey and Yellow for 
Dusting and clean the color from the flowers and buds. 

Browne — Oil entire surface and dust with one part Rose, 
three Pearl Grey, two Ivory Glaze. Second Fire — Oil and 
dust darkest tone with two parts Mode and one part Pearl 
Grey. The hght grey is one part Mode and three Ivory 
Glaze. Red is two parts Peach Blossom and one part Cameo. 

E. T. — Oil entire surface and dust with three parts Dove 
Grey and one Cameo. Second Fire — Oil darkest tone and 
dust with three parts Black and one Blood Red. Green spaces 
are Apple Green and a very little Yeflow Green. Flowers 
and buds are three parts Ivory Glaze and one Mode. Yellow 
centers are Deep Ivory. 

F. G. — Oil entu'e surface and dust with three parts Ivory 
Glaze, one Pearl Grey, one Deep Ivory. Second Fire — Oil 



156 



KERAMIC STUDIO 








^&i^r^^ 




C. W. BROWNE 




E^g 



FLORENCE GOUGH 



PHLOX— ELISE TALLEY (Treatment page 159) 



all darkest tones and dust with two Yellow Browm, one Hair 
Brown, one Pearl Grey. Oil background and dust with same 
as first fire using two Deep Ivory and Yellow Brown. Pink 
tones are oiled and dusted with two Yellow Red and one 
Yellow Brown. 

Browne — Dark green is oiled and dusted with Water 
Lily Green, the lighter green is Grey Blue. Flowers and buds 
two Albert Yellow and Yellow Brown. Second Fire — Oil over 
entire surface and dust with Dove Grey. Clean color from 
buds and flowers. Red centers are Yellow Red. 
Right Hand Row, Top to Bottom 

Browne — Oil entire surface and dust with Yellow for Dust- 
ing and a touch of Deep Ivory. Second Fire — Darkest tones 




ALICE MORSE 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



157 





FACULTY— FOUR WINDS SUMMER SCHOOL— MORNING CLASS 



are oiled and dusted with Dark Grey and a little Yellow Brown. 
Light green is two Water Lily Green and one Ivory Glaze 
Red flowers are two Deep Ivory and one Blood Red. Yellow 
buds are Deep Ivory. 

Browne — Oil the entire surface and dust with two parts 
Dove Grey and one part Glaze for Blue. Second Fire — Oil all 
dark spaces and dust with two Dark Grey, one Pearl Grey 



and one Mode. The lighter grey is three Ivory Glaze and 
one Mode. Yellow is Albert Yellow. 

F. G. — Oil all over and dust with two parts Dove Grey 
and one Caraeo. Second Fire — Oil darkest tone and dust 
with five parts Black and one Blood Red. Green is Floren- 
tine Green. Yellow spots are two Albert Yellow and one 
Yellow Brown. 



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PICNIC AT STOLP'S GULLY— FOUR WINDS SUMMER SCHOOL 




ELISE TALLY 




ELISE TALLY 




F. GOUGH 




MISS J. JACKSON 



MYRTLE McCOY 



f «- . - .sm mmmmmm 




J. JACKSON 




BORDERS FROM PHLOX— MRS. BROWNE 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



159 



GRAPES (Page 163) 

Jeanne M. Stewart 

PALETTE, Banding Blue, Ruby Purple, Blackberry, 
Ivory Yellow, Lemon Yellow, Yellow Brown, Yellow 
Red, Wood Brown, Pompeian Red, Chestnut Brown, Tur- 
quoise Green, Yellow Green, Brown Green, Shading Green 
and Grey. These are the Concord Grapes, Stewart's Black- 
berry alone being used in them, except in a few not quite ripe 
in which a little Ruby Purple is used in brilliant spots. A 
thin wash of Banding Blue is used in light tones. The leaves 
may be kept in the soft dull greens and yellows and browns 
which are more harmonious with the dark blues of the grapes. 
A warm gi-ey tone made with Stewart's Grey to which one 



third Pompeian Red has been added may be made the pre- 
vailing tone in background and shadows. Grapes should 
be given three fires, with no background in first fire. 

A TREATMENT FOR PHLOX 

Paul Putzki 

FOR white flowers use Grey, laying them in masses 
around the center Ruby or Violet. The purple variety 
is painted with Light Violet shading into Dark Violet around 
the center. For pink flowers use Light and Dark Carmine. 
Leaves Dark Green, Yellow Green, Brown Green and Black 
Green. Background is best in cool tones, using grey and green 
effects with a touch of violet. 



5HEJ 





PHLOX— ALICE W. MORSE 



160 



KERAMIC STUDIO 





MRS. BROWNE 



F. GOUGH 





ELISE TALLY MYRTLE McCOY 

ALL OVER PATTERNS FROM PHLOX 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



161 





MEDALLIONS, PHLOX MOTIF— MRS. A. B. SMITH 



f^'^^^v." 




GARDEN MOTIFS— ELISE TALLY 



162 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




CHRYSANTHEMUM— RUSSELL GOODWIN 



Outline design with Black and fire. Oil leaves, dust with Florentine Green. Stems dust with Water Green. 

Flowers dust with Cameo. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



163 




GRAPES— JEANNE M. STEWART 



(Treatment Page 159) 



164 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




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ADAPTATION OF FLOWER MOTIF TO DIFFERENT SPACES— RUTH JOHNSON 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



165 



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ADAPTATION OF FLOWER MOTIF TO DIFFERENT SPACES— J. JACKSON 



166 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




*'*****«**«*#«s«>^^»»*«iiai^^ 









ADAPTATION OF FLOWER MOTIF TO DIFFERENT SPACES— MYRTLE McCOY 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



J67 




ADAPTATION OF FLOWER MOTIF TO DIFFERENT SPACES— ALICE MORSE 




KERAMIC STUDIO 



EVENING PRIMROSE (Page 169) 

Hannah B. Overbeck 

OUTLINE with Grey for Flesh, then fire, then oil all the 
dark leaves and dust with Florentine Green the light 
leaves and buds dust with Bright Green, then paint flowers 
in with Yellow for painting, The stamens are Blood Red 
and Mauve. Next fire — Oil background and dust with Dove 
Grey. Clear out the flowers and paint a little Apple Green 
in centers. 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

.S. M. T. — In ground laying can china be dusted twice without chipping, 
is it best to leave stand before beginning to dust, if so, how longf 

2 — How were the fine lights left in enclosed designs, as I am anxious to gel 
that effect in dusting to outline my design? 

3 — Should unfiuxed gold be used for edges as ivell as dotting on Belleek and 
Satsumal Is it best to use powdered gold and pen for dotting? 

4 — Will a little ruby with pink enamel give a rich red for red poppies'?! 
bought Persian Red but it was heavy and thick looking after firing. 

5 — Is it always best to outline a design for conventional then fire before 
commencing work? 

1 — Ground laying can be dusted on twice if it is not applied too heavily. 
The length of time you leave it stand depends on how heavily the oil is apphed, 
if the oil is apphed very thin it can be dusted at once. 

2 — The hght tone which forms the light hne was dusted over the entire 
surface before the design wa.s applied and the other tones were dusted over 
that after it was fired. 

3 — ^Unfiuxed gold should be used for all purposes on Belleek, it is not 
necessary on Satsuma. It is not necessary to use the powdered gold for 
dotting, a brush would be better than a pen. 

4— Yellow Red and a very httle Ruby added to the white enamel mixture 
can be used for poppies. 

5 — When the entire design calls for an outhne it is usually best to out- 
line and fire though it depends largely on the treatment, if gold is used in the 
design it can often be apphed at the same time as the outline. 

E. E. P. — In your reply to D. G. S. in the December Studio you explained 
the use of dusting colors thai touch vp to the fcini of the dusting of the second 
olor. May I ask you how to manage the powder of the second color so that 



it ivill not fire into the first color? Do you cover the dusted part or is il possible 
to manage the colors neatly enough to keep the colors separate? How many 
fires will the mat colors stand? I have had some trouble with the Mat Olive Green 
peeling off and have rather thought that the second fire might have caused it. 

When dusting with more than one color for a fire the darkest color is 
dusted on first so that if a little of the other colors get on, it will not affect 
it. When the spaces are small a smaller brush is used to do the dusting in 
order not to spread the color onto the other colors any more than possible. 
The mat colors will stand any number of fires. The cause of it peeling off 
is possibly due to the way it was apphed, it may have been applied too heavily. 

C. J . W . — I have the Revelation Kiln No. 6, have it in a dry room, fired 
yesterday, with the kiln full. Slacked the china with asbestos stilts. In it was 
German, Haviland and Satsuma ware; no lustre pieces. Fired two hours — be- 
ginning slowly — opened it six hours later and found the stilts had left three ugly 
marks on most every piece, especially on a stack of nine inch plates, which were 
both German and French. I have fired for seven years and never had this happen 
before. I have some stilts which have very sharp points, but some of my old 
ones left the same mark. If you can explain this I will be most grateful. 

If you know of a 7-eUable book on firing, or rather the most reliable, should 
be glad to purchase it. 

Do not know the cause of the stilt marks unless you over-fired so that 
the glaze fused too much. But use clay stilts, not asbestos stilts. 

You will find complete instructions on firing in our Class Room Book 
No. 3. A great deal about firing must be learned by experience. 

J . C. K. — Will you kindly inform me what is the cause of a piece of china 
turning yellow in the firing? Some liyne ago a pair of salt and peppers decorated 
in gold initials and tops came out of the kiln, one as yellow as Belleek ware, the 
other perfectly white. Yesterday a footed berry bowl came from the kiln just 
as yellow, almost brown. Was decorated in turquoise blue and gold in narrow 
band, rest of the bowl was left white, but now it is almost brown Everything 
in the kiln was alright. Can you tell me the cause of this? Can anything he 
done to ?nake the bowl while? 

The trouble with your china may have been caused by smoke in 
the kiln or it may have come in contact with something in the kiln though 
that is not very likely; it is hard to tell without knowing the make of the 
kiln. You might try to fire it again and give it a very hot fire, this may 
remedy it. 




STUDIES FROM EVENING PRIMROSE 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



169 




EVENING PRIMROSE— HANNAH B. OVERBECK 



(Treatment page 168^ 




FLOWER AND FRUIT MOTIFS— MRS.'' BROWNE 




FLOWER AND FRUIT MOTIFS— RUTH JOHNSON 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



i7t 




•«.-» , • jmm 



FLOWER AND FRUIT MOTIFS— FLORENCE GOUGH 



172 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




FLOWER AND FRUIT MOTIFS—MYRTLE McCOY 




FLOWER AND FRUIT MOTIFS— ALICE MORSE 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



173? 




FLOWER AND FRUIT MOTIFS— ELISE TALLY 



174 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




ACORNS— M. BURNETT 



Leaves use Apple Green and Shading Green. Stems are Brown Green. The acorn caps are Yellow Brown and Brown 

Green. The nuts are Yellow Brown and Auburn Brown. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



175 






COBAEA— DOROTHY PUTZKI 



FLOWERS are Mauve, Rose and Banding Blue. The 
centers are Moss Gi-een and Yellow Brown. The leaves 
are Apple Green, Shading Green and Brown Green. The 
background is Apple Green, Violet and Shading Green. 



Second Fire — Use same coloring used in first firing. Go 
over the darks in leaves only, stems are Auburn Brown and 
Blood Red. 



176 




KERAMIC STUDIO 



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MRS. BROWNE 



GOURD MOTIFS MYRTLE McCOY ELISE TALLY (above) 



i7S 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



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BLACK AND REMAINS SO. I GUARANTEE EVERY BOTTLE! 

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ASK YOUR DEALER FOR "SYRACUSE" OUTLINING INK 

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CONTRIBUTORS 

MARY BURNETT 
KATHRYN E. CHERRY 
ALBERT W. HECKMAN 
MAUD M. MASON 
DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 
HANNAH B. OVERBECK 
DOROTHEA PUTZKT 

FOUR WINDS POTTERY SUMMER SCHOOL 
EXmBITION OF THE NATIONAL SOCIETY 
OF CRAFTSMEN, NEW YORK 






V 



MAR. MCMXIV Price 40c. Yearly Subscription $4.00 



A noriTHLY nmimi m rriE potter and decorator- 



The entire contents of this Magazine are covered by the general copyright, and the articles must not be reprmted without special permission 



CONTENTS OF MARCH, 1914 



Editorial 

Little Things to Make (Supplement) 

Exhibition of the National Society of Craftsmen, New York 

Designs by Pottery Class, Four Winds Pottery Summer School 

Altheas 

Wild Geraniam 

Mash Bowl 

Small Bowl 

Wild Geranium Dresser Set 

Petunia 

Design Class, Four Winds Pottery Summer School 

Answers to Correspondents 

Tall Bell Flower 



Kathryn E. Cherry 



Dorothea Putzki 
Albert W. Heckman 
Albert W. Heckman 
Albert W. Heckman 
Albert W. Heckman 
Mary Burnett 



Hannah B. Overbeck 



Page 
179 

179 

180-187 

188 

189 

190 

191 

191 

192 

193 

194-200 

200 

201 



/6 ^1 

THE OLD RELIABLE Tim FITCH KILNS 




. The thousands of these Kilns in use testify to 
their Good Qualities 



THE ORIGINAL PORTABLE KILN 



INEXPENSIVE TO BUY 
COST LITTLE TO OPERATE 




"e 



l.-j ^ 

The only fuels which give perfect results in _ ^^^"^^^^^k 

Glaze and Color Tone ^^^i^' ft^^?-^ 

No. 2 Size 14 x 12 In $30.00 ) / No. I Size JO x 12 in $15.00 

No. 3 Size 16 x J9 in 40.00 } ^as Kiln 2 sizes ^^^^ ^ ^^^ 2 Size 16 x 12 in 20.00 

1 No. 3 Size J6 x 15 in 25.00 

WRITE FOR DISCOUNTS. ( No. 4 Size I8 x 26 in 50.00 

STEARNS, FITCH & CO,, SPRINGFIELD, OHIO 



^ 





LITTLE THINGS TO MAKE kathryn e. cherry 



MARCH 1914 

SU PPLEMENT TO 

KERAMIC STUDIO 



COPYRIGHT 1914 
KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 



VoL XV. No. iU 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



March I9I4 




HE editor has an apology to make 
to the readers of Keramic Studio for 
occupying so much space with the 
work of the design class of the Four 
Winds Pottery Summer School. The 
fact of the matter is that there was 
so much good and instructive mate- 
rial to select from that the editor did 
not know where to stop, and before 
realizing the space it would take, had 
sent too much material to the engravers. When she found 
there was more than enough to fill the issue assigned to it, she 
was forced to carry the balance over to the present issue. She 
apologizes and "will not do it again." However, to those study- 
ing design it will be most instructive to see how the same motif 
can be varied. 

>i' 

A good friend of Keramic Studio has been complaining that 
we give too much space to one prominent teacher's work. We 
have had this complaint before and we have endeavored to give 
as much variety as we could. It is not purposely that we do 
not give more from the other prominent teachers, but, as we 
explained the last time the complaint was made, not all teachers 
are as generous with their best designs. For some reason they 
feel that to publish them detracts from their studio receipts, as 
if there were no more ideas in their "think tank." Many have 
still to learn that this is a case where it is more blessed to give 
than to receive, for the more you give the more you get. The 
more designs you make the more and better you can make. We 
will try, as we have always tried, to give the best we can get and 
to give as much variety as possible. 

We are showing some illustrations of notable work by Mrs 
Dorothea Warren O'Hara, the pioneer in her style of enamel 
work. While fine enamel work has been done for some years 
past by a number of prominent teachers, both in raised and 
flat enamel, it has remained for Mrs. O'Hara to introduce this 
particular style of large and bold designs carried out in this 
medium. Her work has met with deserved success, the prom- 
inent characteristics being fine color and firm execution. The 
exhibit of Miss Maud Mason in a similar medium shows the 
masterly execution, fine design and interesting color schemes 
with which all are familiar. The technique of both these 
teachers is worthy of study. 

Has any one given thought to the exhibit of overglaze dec- 
orated ceramics at the San Francisco Panama Exposition? Mr. 
Robineau, of Keramic Studio, expects to go to San Francisco to 
arrange the exhibit of Robineau Porcelains and Keramic Studio 
Publications, and if a sufficient number of decorators wish to 
take part in the Exposition, he will, if desired, take charge and 
arrange such an exhibit. If the decorators interested will no- 
tify Keramic Studio, we will make all necessary inquiries as to 
space, show cases and the attendant expenses. It would be 
most impressive if the decorators from all over the countrj^ 
would combine and have one large exhibit. This would attract 
much more attention than scattered groups. Let us hear as 
soon as possible from the various decorators and we will look 
well into the subject and publish all details. 



LITTLE THINGS TO MAKE (S«pplemcnt) 

Kathryn E. Cherry 
OVAL BOX 

OUTLINE design in India Ink, then oil the yellowish brown 
places and dust with Coffee Brown. Then oil the 
green spaces and dust with Green Glaze, then paint in Black 
outlines, then the gold, then fire. 

Second Fire — Paint the entire box with Yellow Brown 
Lustre thinned with lavender oil, then fire. 

Third Fire — Go over Black where necessary and go over 
the Gold again. 

» K 

TALCUM OR POWDERED SUGAR SHAKER 

Outline design with India Ink in grey outlines, then 
oil the dark blue spaces and dust with Dark Blue For 
Dusting, then oil the grey spaces and dust with Dove Grey. 
The Light Blue next in flowers is oiled and dusted with Grey 
Blue. Then put the Gold in with Green Gold. 

K K 

SALT AND PEPPER SHAKER 
Outline design with India Ink and grey the lines, then 
oil and dust the green spaces with Florentine Green, be sure 
the oiled spaces are oiled very thin or the color will be too 
heavy, then paint in the Gold. The red touches are made 
with Yellow Red painted in, this is a good design in gold 
where the green is and green where we have gold. 

SALT DIPS 

Oil the gi-een spaces and dust with Glaze for Green 2 parts 
and 1 part of Bright Green. Then put the pink in which is 
Cameo dusted in, then paint in the Gold. 
K K 
OINTMENT BOX 

Outline design in India Ink and grey the lines, then oil 
the dark spaces and dust with Water Green No. 2, then oil 
the lighter green spaces and dust with Bright Green, then put 
in the gold spaces, then fire. 

Second Fire — Oil the entire surface and dust with Glaze 
for Green. Clean out the Gold, then fire. 

K K 

CANDLESTICK 

Outline design with India Ink, grey the lines, oil the 
green lines and larger spaces, dust with Water Green No. 1 
three parts. Water Green No. 2 one part; then oil the blue 
spaces and dust with Water Green No. 1 one part and Water 
Blue one part, then oil the gi^een spaces and dust with Glaze for 
Blue one part and Bright Green one part, then put in the Gold. 

K K 

SYRUP JUG 

Trace design in carefully, outline in soft grey lines with 
stick India Ink. Then oil the green spaces and dust with 
Florentine Green, then oil the brown spaces and dust with 
Deep Ivory then the flower forms and dust with one part 
of Y^ellow for Dusting, three parts of Glaze for Green. The 
centers are painted in with Yellow Brown and a little Yellow 
Red. 



ISO 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




WILLETT'S BELLEEK VASE OR ELECTROLIER— D. W. O'HARA 
Enamels — Rhodian Red, New Green, Old Chinese Blue 



EXHIBITION OF THE 
NATIONAL SOCIETY OF CRAFTSMEN, NEW YORK 

THE Editor of Keramic Studio being unable to attend the 
exhibition of the Ceramic Guild of the N. S. C, we have 
had to rely on reports from various sources, which, however, 
cover the ground. We give below the varying accovints of the 
newspapers, which are especially interesting as giving different 
view points. As will be seen, the exhibit of the Guild is practi- 
cally made up of the work of Miss Mason and Mrs. O'Hara, about 
the only members of the old N. Y. S. K. A. left. The following 
account is from Miss Horsfall, a pupil of Miss Maud Mason, 
and secretary of the N. Y. S. K. A. 

"Since the New York Society of Keramic Art became the 
Ceramic Guild of the National Society of Craftsmen, no exhibi- 
tion of Ceramics has been as important as that forming part of 
the Annual Exhibition in the galleries of the National Arts Club. 
While all the exhibitors were not members of the Guild, the most 
conspicuous advance appears to have been among these earnest 
craftworkers. From the studio of Miss Maud M. Mason fifty- 
five pieces of overglaze were shown. Miss Mason has experi- 
mented with relief enamels with satisfactory results. She ob- 
tains brilliancy combined with softness, and precision without 
the hard line often characteristic of enamels. Choosing Belleek 
pieces of pleasing form, she unites strength and variety in design 
with charming color and masterly execution. A salad set in 
orange and black, a Bar-le-duc set in blue, pink, green and orange, 
a plate in fruit design, are admirable examples of the artistic in 
table ware. Several bowls of beautiful color and design, a tall 
flagon in lustre, a tea-set in gold on French china, are all import- 
ant in marking the advance in this department of ceramics in re- 
cent years. 

"Mrs. Dorothea Warren O'Hara has likewise been success- 
ful in using relief enamel. Her designs show the influence of 











-. ■ - ^ . ... • . /, ■^"' '■■" 












^^^^^^^^"-^-^^^ 


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llnl'/f 


i 



CERAMIC BELLEEK BOWL— DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 
Enamels — Extra Hard, Red, Apple Green 



EXHIBITION OF THE NATIONAL SOCIETY OF CRAFTSMEN, NEW YORK 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



181 



Persia, though one lovely jar is French in inspiration. She 
shows tiles for mantel and window-box, teapots, jars and bowls 
of brilliant effect. Mrs. Caswell, Mrs. Georgia Pierce linger and 
Miss Florence Penman exhibit meritorious work in the new 
enamel. Mrs. Leonard is represented by a charming piece of 
lustre. Albert J. Rott has a distinguished set of plates in gold 
on French china. Mrs. F. Waterfield, Miss Ree Zug, Miss A. K. 
Lovett, M. C. Armstrong, Anna M. Walling, B. S. Davis, Mrs. 
Weightman, E. D. Callowhill and Miss Adeline Lienau show 
pleasing work in overglaze. 

"The largest showing of pottery is from the Marblehead 
kilns. The exhibit includes many charming pieces in soft grays, 
greens and blues, a lovely soft yellow, and a faint gray used as 
backgi'ound for designs of birds, flowers and conventional mo- 
tives. A jar with sea-horse and sea- weed motive is especially 
noticeable, as well as a salad set with bird and floral design. 
Groups of lovely tiles add variety to the exhibit. The tendency 
in this distinguished work from Mr. Baggs' shop is lighter forms 
and greater variety in glazes, a step in the right direction. Miss 
Penman and Miss Hardenburgh progress steadily toward their 
ideal of perfection. Their pieces are beautiful in form, happy in 
color, and of practical value. Noticeable among them are a 
large jardiniere in blue, and a smaller one in a delightful gi^een. 
The Newcomb Potteries show a number of pieces in floral de- 
signs in incised work. The Paul Revere Potteries have many 
pieces of the charming nursery and table ware for which they are 
well and favorably known. The Hampshire Potteries show 
pieces of pleasing color and form; the Quaker Road Potteries ex- 
hibit several happy examples of their work, and the Glen Tor 
Pottery is also well represented. Greenwich House sends a 
green lamp, and the Young Women's Christian Associatian some 
interesting tiles. The Niloak Potteries show jars and vases in 
marble effect that are striking and novel. Mr. Frederick E. 
Walrath exhibits some small ornamental pieces of pleasing color 
and design. The general trend of the potters seems to be to- 




CERAMIC BELLEEK TEA CADDY— DOROTHEA W. O'HARA 
Enamels — Lavender, Dall Violet, Green 




>,^^^^p^, ':i:^.V^/^-^>?^t^';^^ 




HAVILAND PLACE PLATE— DOROTHEA "WARREN O'HARA 
Enamels — ^Ming Blue, Red, Yellow 



TILES FOR MANTELS OR PANELS— DOROTHEA W. O'HARA 
Enamels — Manchti BI«e, Blue Green, Old Chinese Pink 



EXHIBITION OF THE NATIONAL SOCIETY OF CRAFTSMEN, NEW YORK 



182 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




CERAMIC BELLEEK BOWL— DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 
Enamels — Gray Violet, Mancha Blae, Green 

ward smaller, lighter pieces than formerly, in a gi-eater variety of 
color. Though the pottery suffered by being scattered about 
the exhibition, it is gratifying to note that the sales were in ex- 
cess of former years, amounting in the Ceramic department to 
more than one thousand dollars. The exhibition, as a whole, 
demonstrates that a new impetus in ceramics has arisen. Both 
in the overglaze and pottery the work becomes more earnest, and 
the future will no doubt determine the value of the experiments 
now going on in the studios." 

Description of the pieces shown by Miss Maud Mason are 
accompanied by the following note from Miss Mason herself: 




DESSERT SET— MAUD M. MASON (No. 3) 
Dark Bltie and Orange Enamels on a soft, creamy glaze 

"My object has been to do simple, artistic and usable articles, 
cheering in spirit and requiring as little labor as possible in the 
doing of them. * * * The Ceramic Guild of the Nat. Soc. 
Craftsmen has done so much toward creating the present stand- 
ard, that we are anxious to make as fine a showing in Keramic 
Studio, as possible." 

Group No. 1 — The jar and bowl in this group are examples of 
pieces in which the entire body is covered with enamel; the back- 
gi'ound in each case is in black enamel and the designs in dull blue, 
reds and greens. If the enamel is used with restraint, and in not 
too high relief, a very rich and beautiful effect is gained this way. 
The little bowl and plate is done in an entirely different way. 
This is treated very directly in brilliant enamel on a soft glaze in 
one fire. 

Group No. 2 — These pitchers, as well as the whole exhibit, 
were designed with the thought of presenting cheerful, usable, 
and artistic table-ware, being done in a simple, direct way, in 
bright colored enamels on the creamy porcelain ground in one or 
two firings. The scheme of the bowl is soft orange, a manganese 
red, and touches of turquoise. 




GROUP OF PORCELAINS, POLYCHROME ENAMELS— MAUD M. MASON (No. 1) 
EXHIBITION OF THE NATIONAL SOCIETY OF CRAFTSMEN, NEW YORK 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



183 




GROUP OF PITCHERS IN POLYCHROME ENAMELS— MAUD M. MASON (No. 2) 



Group No. 3 — This is a dessert set in dark blue and orange 
enamels on a soft, creamy glaze. 

Group No. 4 — The plaque is in Canton and Nankin blue 
enamel on a hard French glaze. The white and gold coffee set 
is simple and usable and at the same time has a distinctly rich 
effect. 

Group No. 5 — This set consists of a cracker jar, a marmalade 
jar, a cheese plate and six side plates. It is in gay colored enam- 
els in blues, reds, orange and greens on a Belleek glaze." 

Mr. O'Hara writes as follows: "Mrs. O'Hara has worked 
out through years of practical experience, this broad enamel dec- 
oration, and this year has a wonderful display. Her color 
schemes and designs, as well as technique, have received most 
favorable comment from many of the leading artists. Mr. Mar- 
shal Fry unhesitatingly expressed himself along these lines." 

Mr. J. Nilsen Laurvik, a recognized authority on ceramics 
and well-known art critic, member of the Board of Governors of 
the Nat. Arts Club, says: "Mrs. O'Hara's work is a new note 




PLACQUE, HARD GLAZE BLUE ENAMEL— MAUD M. MASON (No. 4) 
COFFEE SET, WHITE AND GOLD— ELIZABETH MASON VANDERHOOF 




BAR LE DUC SET, SOFT PORCELAIN, BRILLIANT POLYCHROME ENAMELS— MAUD M. MASON (No. 5) 
EXHIBITION OF THE NATIONAL SOCIETY OF CRAFTSMEN, NEW YORK 



184 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




MARBLEHEAD POTTERY— ARTHUR E. BAGGS 

in the whole exhibition. Her pieces are of bold, simple design 
and clear strong color, showing artistic discernment and techni- 
cal^skill of a high order," 

NEWSPAPER COMMENTS 

New York American: "The National Society of Craftsmen 
is holding its seventh annual exhibition in the galleries of the 
National Arts Club. It may be commended to the notice of 
those who are looking for Christmas gifts which are a little out of 
the ordinary. The exhibition will also interest those who are 
watching the development in this country of beauty of design 
and workmanship in the objects, necessary and otherwise, of 
every day use. In this development the society is playing its 
part, the importance of which, however, it is possible to overrate. 
What is particularly noticeable in this exhibition is that the qual- 
ity of the craftsmanship is, generally speaking, superior to that 
of the design. One after the other, these exhibitors display 
adaptability in place of creative imagination. They make roving 
expeditions into the decorative arts of the Renaissance, the Mid- 
dle Ages, Celtic and Icelandic. Have these craftsmen no ideas 
of their own? Are they as dead to the spirit of our own times as 
the forms they steal? Are we to conclude that the American 
craftsman has no creative imagination, but only a little ingenious 
invention in the way of cribbing and adapting? I am aware 
that much of this soulless imitation is due to the demands of ar- 
chitects, who, being themselves without imagination, mere jug- 
glers with measured drawings of antique buildings, require the 



same slavishness to antiquity in the exterior and interior decora- 
tions. But it is sad to see a society that calls itself National, and 
advocates high artistic aims lending itseh as an accessory to this 
imitative business and virtually compounding a felony. 

New York Evening Post: "Frankly the crafts movement 
has disappointed many of its most ardent well-wishers, but if the 
visitor is not too exacting he may find at the galleries of the Na- 
tional Arts Club where the National Society of Craftsmen is now 
holding its seventh annual exhibition, a gi-eat variety of articles 
of minor artistic importance. * * * The tables and show 
cases are filled with a vast number of objects of every descrip- 
tion, pottery, and porcelain, among which some enameled tiles 
and other pieces by Dorothea O'Hara strike a refreshingly vivid 
note." 

Boston Transcript: "It is really astonishing how closely the 
thrill of good craftsmanship approaches the thrill of great art, so 
closely indeed that it is difficult to tell where the one begins and 
the other ends. That is the lesson taught by an exhibition such 
as this, and our ailists who dwell on Mount Olympus would do 




GERMAN CHINA PLACQUE - DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 
Enamels — Blue Green, Mancta Blue 




CERAMIC BELLEEK TEA POT— DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 
Enamels— Dark Blue, Dtill Yellow, Old Chinese Pink, New Green 



well to come down from their perch and take a look in at the work 
of their humble brothers, the craftsmen, to whom a useful thing 
is not an offence forever. Here are some tiles, dishes, vases and 
bowls, by Mrs. Warren O'Hara, of bold, simple design and clear, 
strong color, showing artistic discernment and technical skill of 
a high order. Many of these pieces are worthy competitors with 
the best produced in Germany, where the branch of keramics has 
been brought to such a high state of perfection. Miss Maud 
Mason is another whose work has advanced notably since last 
year. The design and color of the decorations of her jugs, bowls 
and tiles is thoroughly modern and has more character than ever. 
Now and then, as in the delicate green and buff glazes on a pitcher 
she makes a close approach to perfection, showing she is aware 
of the effects ultimately ^^to be attained in this dbection." 

New York Evening Sun: "Any one who has a warm heart 
spot for keramics will find gi-eat delight in the enameled tiles of 
Mrs. Dorothea O'Hara. There's a feast for the eyes in Miss M. 
M. Mason's tulip bowl." 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



185 




TILES— MISS FLORENCE PENMAN JAR AND BOWL— MRS. J. UNGER PITCHER, BOWL AND PLATE— MRS. CASWELL. 

PUPILS OF MISS MAUD MASON 




HARBLEHEAD POTTERY— A, I. HENNESEY. 
EXHIBITION OF THE NATIONAL SOCIETY OF CRAFTSMEN, NEW YORK. 



186 



KERAMIC STUDIO 





PUNCH BOWL, WILLETT'S BELLEEK— DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 
Enamels — Background of Old Egyptian Turquoise, Manchu Blue, Cobalt Blue and Light Green. 



SATSUMA VASE- 
DOROTHEA WARREN 
O'HARA 

Enamels — Dark Blue, 
Old Egyptian Turquoise, 
Pale Lilac. 





CERAMIC BELLEEK BOWL— DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 
Enamels — Cobalt Blue, Dark Blue, Dull Yellow, Ligbt Green. 



ELECTROLIER— DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 
Enamels— Dull Yellow, Dark Yellow, Green Old Egyptian. 



EXHIBITION OF THE NATIONAL SOCIETY OF CRAFTSMEN, NEW YORK 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



137 




CERAMIC BELLEEK COVERED JAR. 
Enamels — Old Chinese Bltie, Dull Yellow, 
New Green, Sevres Blue, Pink, Lavender, Dall 
Violet, Light Yellow. 



DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 

WILLETT'S BELLEEK PUNCH BOWL. 
Enamels — Background of Old Chinese Blue, 
Pale Lilac, Dull Violet, New Green, Old Yellow. 



SATSUMA TEA POT. 
Enamels — Old Chinese Blue, Old Chinese 
Pink, Pink, Dull Yellow, Persian Red, Lav- 
ender, Dull Violet, Light Yellow, New Green, 
Blue Green. 





TILES FOR WINDOW BOXES— DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 
Enamels — Dull Yellow, Meadow Green, Rouen Blue. 




CERAMIC BELLEEK COVERED JAR— DOROTHEA W. O'HARA CERAMIC BELLEEK BOWL— DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 

Enamels — New Green, Dark Yellow Enamels — Dull Yellow, Meadow Green, Pale Lilac. 

EXHIBITION OF THE NATIONAL SOCIETY OF CRAFTSMEN, NEW YORK 



188 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




MRS. WEBBER 




MISS ALEYNE WEBBER 




MISS CARTER 




MRS. VAN PELT MRS. CAMP MRS. BROWNE MRS. MORSE 

FOUR WINDS SUMMER SCHOOL— POTTERY CLASS 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



189 




ALTHEAS— DOROTHY PUTZKI 



PAINT leaves with Brown Green and Shading Green. Flowers 
are almost white with deep pink touches in center made 
with Rose and a little Ruby. Backgi'ound, Yellow for Painting, 



Mauve and Copenhagen Blue with touches of Brown Green. 
Second Fire — Use same color used in first fire shading 
center of flowers with Apple Green and Yellow very delicate. 



i% 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




WILD GERANIUM— ALBERT W. HECKMAN 

Flowers are a Purplish Pink. Buds are a Bluish Green and leaves are a Warm Yellow Green. The formation of the flower 
is very much like that of the wild rose. Stamens are Yellow and Yellow Brown. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



191 




MUSH BOWL— ALBERT W. HECKMAN 



(Treatment page 194) 



}#: ^X o R. Ai 



01 o 




SMALL BOWL— ALBERT W. HECKMAN 



(Treatment page 194) 



i92 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




WILD GERANIUM DRESSER SET— A. W. HECKMAN 



(Treatment page 194) 



KERAMIC STUDIO i93 



PETUNIA— MARY BURNETT (Treatment page 201) 



194 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



WILD GERANIUM DRESSER SET (Page 192) 

Albert W. Heckman 

FOR the first fire execute the background in two tones of 
Grey Green. Paint in the flowers with Pearl Grey, add 
little Lemon Yellow and some Yellow Green with the Grey 
for the petals near the centers of the flowers. The buds and 
suggestion of leaves are a Bluish Grey Green. Paint in all 
the black parts of the design with Roman Gold. 

For the second fire touch up the flowers, use iPeach Blos- 
som and Violet No. 2. 

MUSH BOWL (Page 191) 

Albert W. Heckman 

FIRST Fire — Oil all the dark parts and dust with one part 
Banding Blue, one part Copenhagen Blue and one part 
Pearl Grey. 

Second Fire — Execute the two tones of background with 
the same mixture of Blue but add more Grey. Wipe out the 
whites before firing. 

Third Fire — Oil the whole bowl and dust with six parts 
Pearl Grey and one part Deep Blue Green. 

SMALL BOWL (Page 190 

Albert W. Heckman 

THIS design may be applied to an octagonal shaped bowl 
or to a round one as in the illustration. For the lighter 
tone of the background use a Light Yellow Brown and for the 
other tone use a little Olive Green with the Yellow Brown. 
The flower forms are Yellow with Yellow Red dots. The 
buds are a Dark Warm Green and all the black bands and 
corners are Roman Gold. Use the same colors for the inside 
border. 

A letter received from Miss Lela Hursey of Parkersburg, 
W. Va., says: "We are delighted with the new book, 'Little 
Things to Make,' and think it will be of great help to us in our 
work." 




PHLOX MOTIF— MRS. BROWNE 

FOUR WINDS SUMMER SCHOOL WORK 

Kathryn E. Cherry. 

THE study of design in the Summer School was not the first 
desire with the student, for many felt it necessary to take 
home with them as many pieces of decorated china as the time 
would permit, these to be used in their classes for their winter's 
teaching. However an effort was made to give the student some 
knowledge of the principles of design and the applying a given 
motif in rhythmic line and space fiUing. 

The first lessons were devoted to space filling, using a Per- 
sian motif, placing it in various outlines spaces, as the illustra- 
tion shows, then tone value, then color value and variation of 
same was carried out. Later the phlox from the gardens about 
us was brought into the studio, a careful study was made of the 
natural flower and the growth of it. This flower was the motif 
used throughout our summer's work; it was conventionalized in 
various spaces, then these same designs were done in tones and 
colors. The phlox played an important part as a motif in de- 
signs executed in the ceramic classes, being especially useful for 
the etching and dusting pieces. 



& 





PHLOX MOTIF— MRS. BROWNE PHLOX MOTIF— MRS. BROWNE 

FOUR WINDS SUMMER SCHOOL 




KERAMIC STUDIO 



195 



J. JACKSON 




MYRTLE McCOY 




ALICE MORSE 




FLORENCE GOUGH 



PANELS, PHLOX MOTIF 
FOUR WINDS SUMMER SCHOOL 



196 



KERAMIC STUDIO 










O 




ADAPTATION OF FLOWER MOTIF TO DIFFERENT SPACES— MRS. BROWNE 
FOUR WINDS SUMMER SCHOOL 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



J97 






«. 




% 



r 






ADAPTATION OF FLOWER MOTIF TO DIFFERENT SPACES— ELISE TALLY 
FOUR WINDS SUMMER SCHOOL 



198 



KERAMIC STUDIO 





MRS. A. B. SMITH 




FLOWER AND^FRUIT MOTIFS— MISS J. JACKSON 
FOUR WINDS SUMMER SCHOOL 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



199 





MEDALLION, PHLOX MOTIF— MYRTLE McCOY 



MEDALLION, PHLOX MOTIF— J. JACKSON 




GARDEN MOTIFS— ELISE TALLY 
FOUR WINDS SUMMER SCHOOL 



200 



KERAMIC STUDIO 






BORDERS FROM PHLOX— MRS. BROWNE 




catch the (hist and are hard to clean. They are usually used lor ornamental 
pieces. 



ALL OVER PATTEPJM PHLOX— ALICE MORSE 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

BEGINNER — Would you kindly tell me how to do metallic work in china 



2 — What are majolica and mat glazes, and what are they mostly adapted to 
in china? 

1 — If you mean work that has a metallic effect you probably refer to the 
lustre work. Paint the design in Gold and fire it, and then put a coat of 
Light Green Lustre over the entire surface; this will give you a hght green back- 
grotmd and the design will have a bronze appearance. You can get the differ- 
ent metal effects with the different lustres. There is a copper for the copper 
effect. Make tests on broken bits of china. 

2 — Majolica glaze is a semi-glaze, and the mat glaze is as the name sug- 
gests a mat glaze, or one without a glaze. They are not practical, as they 



i<lr< 



I d, 



f irlial to rh(rr(je for dccorutiny a iESl- 
i)i,' jhiirt r part rose and violet, the rest 
,-■ (if liu-ii piici , I'm: Utile circular design to be 
I have ju)it began taking orders on my work 



O. M. R.—Crni ,,m, rprr vw a 

in tinld] a (/old hruid around Ihr r, 
placed in the center of plal-es, etc. 
and have almost no idea oj values. 

It would be impossible to set a price on the set of di.shes for you, as a great 
deal would depend on the price of the china and also on the grade of work. In 
making a price for any piece of work, it is always best to count the cost of all 
the materials and firing, and then value your work at a certain price by the 
hour 01- day and add that to the price of the materials. 

/. S. — What is a good formula for a -pairding oil, one thai a druggist could 
make up for us at any timef 

Use about 6 parts Oil of Copaiba and 1 part Lavender Oil. 

S. J. D. — What is lavender medium for raised paste, and where can it be 
obtained? 

2 — Can raised paste be applied mechanically xoith a tool other than the brush? 

3 — What kind oj a brush should toe use for raised paste? 

4 — 7.S it advisable to make use of raised paste for initials on dinner set? 

1 — The lavender medium for raised paste can be bought at a drug store. 
The cheapest quality should be used, as it does not contain as much oil. Lav- 
ender compound for technical purposes is the best. 

2 — ^Raised paste can only be applied with a brush. 

3 — A No. 1 red sable pointed water color brush is the best to use. 

4 — It is not advisable to use raised paste on the initials for a dinner sot 
unless it is used quite flat. 



,,/■ I In h, 



lint's fiir roses'^ Also reds 
l:unj ijinpes, blue, while and 
ijlil .-Jiiiiles to use in making 



MRS. B. B.—What nn Ih. 
for rosesf What are the caned nnlnr,- in Im /;.-,, d in 
shadowsf Will you please tjux me the niiinen oj Hi 
cherries, Idack raspberries and red raspberries^ 

Lay in pink rose.s for the first fire with a very delicate tone of Blood-red 
so they are a dehcate pink, and for a second fire touch up the shadows with 
Rose, using a Uttle Violet for the darkest touches. A little Yellow may be 
used for the lighter shadows. 

Use Blood-red and Ruby very pale for the lights on red roses and heavier 
for the shadows. In retouching a little Rose may be used for the lights and 
a little Black added to the Ruby for the darkest tones. 

For blue grapes, Banding Blue and a little Deep Blue Green for the lights, 
and Violet and Royal Purple added for the darkest tones, and a little Black 
where it is needed. 

For white grapes. Yellow, Violet and .4pple Green, and sometimes a little 
Yellow BrowTi is needed or a dark green. 

For cherries. Yellow-red, Blood-red and a Uttle Ruby. 

For black raspberries, Bandmg Blue and Black for hghts. Royal Purple 
and Black and a Httle Ruby for the dark. Red raspberries, Carnation, Blood- 
red very pale for the hghts, and in some places a httle Yellow for the highest 
hghts, Blood-red and a little Ruby. Black for the darkest tones. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



201 




PETUNIA (Page 193) 

M. Btirnett 

FOR flowers use Turquoise Blue very delicate. 
Shade with Mauve and Banding Blue. The 
centers are Blood Red and a little Mauve. The 
stems are Apple Green and Mauve. Leaves are 
Apple Green and Brown Green. 

PERSONAL 

The editor wishes to ask if any readers of Ker- 
amic Studio have old stamp collections which they 
would care to exchange for Keramic Studio publi- 
cations or "Robineau Porcelains." She has a son 
who is much interested in stamps, whose collection 
having passed the 3000 mark, finds it taking too 
much of his spending money. If you have stamps 
to exchange, write the editor. 



TALL BELLFLOWER— HANNAH B. OVERBECK 

OUTLINE design in India ink, then paint background with Copen- 
hagen Blue and Apple Green; then leaves with Yellow Green 
and Brown Green; then flowers with Deep Blue Green and Mauve. 
The stamens are Blood Red and Mauve. The stems are Apple Green. 
Repeat same coloring in second firing leaving lights very delicate. 




DETAILS OF TALL BELLFLOWER. 



202 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



BUFFALO EXHIBITION 

The Buffalo Keramic League will hold an Exhibition of 
Decorated China in the Banquet Room of the Hotel Iroquois 
2:30 to 10 P. M. Friday, March 13, and 10 A. M. to 10 P. M. 
Saturday, March 14. The public is invited and an exceedingly 
interesting exhibition promised. 



Is Outlining Easy For You? 

It may he, or it may not be. In either case you will want 
the new **0. D. X." Lesson on Outlining. The price is 
only 25c, and the lesson is easily worth a dollar to any dec- 
orator who justly values her time. One lady who had no 
trouble with this work wrote that after reading this lesson 
she accomplished in one hour work that would have taken 
her a whole afternoon. 

In this lesson you will find the SECRET of EASY and 
RAPID WORK; learn how to relieve the eyes from 
strain; how to steady the trembling hand; in fact, with the 
aid of this lesson, the hardest and most uninteresting part 
of conventional work will become a pastime. 

There is also a valuable hint on how to sell conventional 
work to customers who have never liked it. This hint 
is alone worth the price of the lesson. 

Send for it — you can get it from any dealer who has the 
O. D. X. Designs — or order direct from 

THE ORIGINAL DESIGN EXCHANGE, MEDINA, N. Y. 



lOCts. THIS BRE4D AND BUTTER PL4TE DESIGN lOCfs. 




and THE HERRICK CHINA BOOK showing 100 con- 
ventional designs for caps, saucers, plates, etc., with 
color suggestions for ALL. NO carbon used with OUR 
patterns which trace DIRECT on china. Easy for 
beginners. Valuable for teachers. Send lOc. to-day 
for this plate pattern and Herrick China Book. 
Send for above pattern TO-DAY and we'll include a certificate 

which entitles yoa to ANY 14 PATTERNS FOR Sl.OO 

THE HERRICK DESIGNS CO., 3750 Grant Park Bldg., CHICAGO 




PORTRAITS FIRED IN 
ON CHINA A SUCCESS 

After seventeen years of close application I have 
produced a BOOK with formulas COMPLETE. 

"HOW TO MAKE YOUR OWN FILMS; 
PAINTS TO USE and HOW TO FIRE" 

Because of the increasing demand, I am now 
able to offer you this book for $1.00 for Teachers 
and Art Students. Money returned if not as stated 

(Cut shows a Portrait Fired on China) 

J. ORRELL MILEN 

THE CLIFFS, FARMINGTON, IOWA 



Mary Esther Billings, Bridgeport. Conn. 
BRILLIANT ENAMELS 

Superior Colors, Mediums and Lustres 
Correspondence School of Enameling on Porcelain 

pro 1^ pi My Booklet, "Helpful Hints From the Color Maker." 
' JM-jl-J Send 4 cents in stamps to cover mailing. 



WHITE'S ART CO. 
Roman Gold ^ Su perior China Colors 

The Gold and Colors that we have tised in our studio for years and which have 
made White's Decorated China famotis throughowt America. 

We are one of the largest decorators of China in the country. Our Matt 
Colors cannot be dtiphcated. 

Send 50 cents for sample box of our Gold or $1.00 for 3 samples of 

Our Famous Matt Colors 

We make a specialty of teaching Etching on China and Enamel Work. 
Write for partictjlars regarding oar next class. 



WHITE'S ART CO., 201 East Ontario St., CHICAGO, ILL. 



When writing to advertisers please mention this magazine 



China by Parcel Post 




'-£31 



, The new rates are so liberal and 
the limit of 20 pounds, in force 
since January 1st, bring the 
good goods and great assort- 
ment that we offer practically to 
every door. 

These new rates are: Under 160 
miles, Ic a pound; under 300 



miles, 2c a pound; under 600 miles, 4c a pound; under 1,000 miles, 6c a 
pound; under 1,400 miles, 8c a pound, with one additional initial charge of 
from Ic to 4c on each lot. List of china sent on request. 

The "Arto Banding Wheel is self-centering and now made a little better 
than ever. Every user is pleased with it. 

Everything for Artists 

ABBOTT & CO., 127 Nor(h Wabash Avenue, Chicago 
Seliing Agents for Revelation Kilns outside Cook Co., 111. 

To Advertisers 

Advertisers' copy should be in our hands by the first of the 
month previous to date of issue. Matter intended for the April 
number should be in our hands by March 1st, if proof is desired. 
Advertisements on yearly contract basis will be repeated 
unless change of copy reaches this oflBce on or before 5th of 
month previous to date of issue. 

April copy must be here on the 5th of March to insure in- 
sertion. If proof is desired it must be here on March 1st. 

QUESTION AND ANSWER DEPARTMENT 

Subscribers will please note that no "Answers to Corres- 
pondents" are sent by mail. Every answer is published in the 
magazine, therefore, it is useless to send us a stamped envelope 
for reply. 




Send Your Order Now 
for Prompt Delivery 

Price $2.50 post-paid 



K. E. CHERRY 
CHINA COLORS 



STANDARD COLORS 

As Good as the Best 

SPECIAL DUSTING COLORS 

Different from anything else on the market 

Send for price list in standard vials or in half 
vials. 

Special price list of all colors in bottles con- 
taining 50 grammes for use of schools or teach- 
ers having big classes. 

SAMPLE OF ANY COLOR, 5 CENTS 

20 Par Cent. Discount to Teachers 




itmm 

China Colors 



YELLOW 



^BffiEAUPOTTS^ 



THE ROBINEAU POTTERY 

SYRACUSE, N. Y. 




Book of 
CupssL' Saucers 




COPYRIGHTED I9U 

RERAMIC STUDIO PUBUSHING CO. 

SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



BOOK OF CUPS AND SAUCERS 

Published in one volume of 26 pages, it contains the choicest designs pub- 
lished in back numbers of KERAMIC STUDIO— many of which are now 
entirely out of print; and are excellent examples of America's most famous 
decorators of china. The group of six designs for Cups and Saucers in Col- 
or by Kathryn E. Cherry, which form the frontispiece, is a valuable feature 
as each design may be adapted to an entire set of China. 

PRICE $1.50 POSTPAID PROMPT DELIVERY 




KERAMIG STUDIO 

A Monthly Magazine 
for the China Painter and Potter 



I YEAR w 



6 MONTHS $2 



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KERAMIC BOOKS 

The following books, each complete in 1 volume: postpaid 

Grand Feu Ceramics, doth cover ? 5.00 

The Fruit Book „ 3.0O 

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Room No. 1 ; 3.00 

Flower Painting on Porcelain. Class Room No. 2.....: 3.00 
Figure Painting on Porcelain and Firing. Class 

Room No. 3 3.00 

Conventional Decoration of Pottery and Porcelain. 

Class Room No. 4 3.00 

Book of Cups and Saucers (New) 1.50 

Book of Little Things to Make (new) 2.50 



m 


1 


iBimJ 


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THE CLASS ROOM 


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Flower Painting 

On Porcctan 


II 




^ 


WH 




tmnac^^m^SiXlata, 


£ 


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nAa. 




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TIME EXTENDED ON 



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newals) and choose from the follow- 
ing: 
The Art of Teaching China Deco- 

ration. Class Room No. 1 | 3.00 

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Class Room No. 2 3.00 

Figure Painting on Porcelain and 

Firing. Class Room No. 3 3.00 

Conventional Decoration of Pot- 
tery and Porcelain. Class 
Room No. 4 3.00 

PREMIUM 

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SUBSCRIBER is FOUR COLOR 

STUDIES OR DESIGNS worth $1.00! 

We now offer until February 1st. 

1914, a premium of six color studies 

or designs worth $1.50 for one NEW 

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^1^1 I^[=}^[=]^[=I^(SIS^^if5 [=3 l=]^[=l [=11^ [=][=][=][=>I=II=][=] 1=11=11=1 [=l[=II=]t=]I=l[^ 

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lyiyC^Y OUR IQTH ANNIVERSARY NUMBER |y|/\Y ^ 

g^^HE May issue of Kcramic Studio will he the most interesting and valuable number of this 




K«r\^.^j Magazine ever published. It will contain two color supplements as follows, 



^S^JKI -TWO ROSE JARS^' by Henrietta Barclay Paist. -STUDY OF CURRANTS" by 



S Jeanne M. Stewart, (the first one by this popular artist has been out of print for years); also 

An Extra Ei^ht-Page Supplement 

s containing Naturalistic and Semi-Naturalistic Designs adapted to Ceramic shapes. This is being 

I done in response to a demand that we cannot ignore. It is an important epoch in the life, of this 

I Magazine and we want your loyal support, as we are considering making this supplement a 

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1 KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO. 



'^[=]I=][=]I=3|3I=l[=]|=]r=]|=l[=][=]I3 [=11=1 [3[=]I=] 1=11=11=11=1 [=I|=]I=l|=][3I=]I3I3I3[=^ 



H 



The entire contCTts of this Magazme are coTered by the general copyright, and the articles must not be reprinted without special permission 

CONTENTS OF APRIL, 1914 



Editorial 

Panel, adapted from the Japanese 

How to Enlarge a Design 

Tile, adapted from the Japanese 

Placque, adapted from the Japanese 

Panel, adapted from the Japanese 

Bitter-Sweet Stttdy 

Low Fruit Bowl, Bitter-Sweet 

Fruit Plate, Bitter-Sweet 

Cup and Saucer, Bitter-Sweet 

Borders and Units for Bitter-Sweet 

Plantain Lily 

Chocolate Cup and Saucer 

Dogwood (Supplement) 

Dogwood 

Nightshade 

Conventional Suggestions for Nightshade 

Vase, Nightshade 

Narcissus 

Punch Bowl, Iris 

Iris 

High Bowl, Iris 

Chocolate Pot, Iris 

Jonquils 

Vase, Iris 

Low Bowl, Iris 

Choke Cherries 

Answers to Correspondents 



Henrietta Barclay Paist 
Jessie M. Bard 
Henrietta Barclay Paist 
Henrietta Barclay Paist 
Henrietta Barclay Paist 
Isabelle C. Kissinger 
Isabelle C. Kissinger 
Isabelle C. Kissinger 
Isabelle C. Kissinger 
Isabelle C. Kissinger 
Lena E. Kanscom 
Bertha Herbert 
E. Sendcrling 
R. E, Saunier 
M. H. Watkcys 
M. H. Watkeys 
M. H. Watkeys 
Jane Pontius Baker 
Hannah B. Ovcrbeck 
Hannah B. Overbeck 
Hannah B. Overbeck 
Hannah B. Overbeck 
Jane Pontius Baker 
Hannah B. Overbeck 
Hannah B. Overbeck 



iS 



Page 
203 

204 
204 
205 
206 
207 
208 
209 
209 
210 
210 
211 
212 
212 

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216 
217 
221 
219 
219 
220 
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223 
225 
222 



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WRITE FOR DISCOUNTS. 



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Sf 



Vol. XV. No. 12. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



April 191 4 




LAS and alack! What a swarm of 
bees about the editor's head ! "Such 
a business!" as the funny papers put 
it. That number full of summer 
school work which the editor thought 
was going to be so helpful, not only 
in the good material for design, but 
as a sort of free object lesson, has 
brought a perfect storm of disap- 
proval from a couple of our good 
naturalistic friends. Tut! Tut! as mother used to say. Ex- 
cept for one consolation the editor would have been annihilated, 
but as one of our subscribers naively puts it: "Hundreds would 
write what they thought, but they do not want to be shown up 
and belittled in your editorial where, of course, you have all the 
advantage as to what you will publish about the few that dare 
say anything." You see there is always the satisfaction that 
no one can "talk back" in print unless the editor wishes it. But 
to tell the truth, there is nothing the editor enjoys so much as 
these letters of criticism, for while there is often much that 
shows only lack of instruction, there is hardly one letter but the 
editor can extract some honey from it, some idea that is helpful, 
either as a regulator of too great enthusiasm in the forward 
march, or as an inspiration for an editorial, and the latter espe- 
cially is a god-send after these fifteen years of trying to fill the 
editorial page with something either entertaining or instructive. 
And one thing let us assure our good correspondents and that is, 
there is no criticism that we would not publish, and that, not to 
belittle the writer, but because it gives us the opportunity of 
clearing the atmosphere for a number that think likewise. Any 
one who wants to "talk back" can always be sure of room on the 
editorial page except for personalities. We draw the line at 
"naming names." Now to give you the gist of the last bunch of 
letters laid upon the editorial table. 

The first letter to bring joy to our heart was as follows, 
omitting the "naming of names:" 

"Will you allow a subscriber to make a criticism? In look- 
ing over the February number, I find it contains twenty-six 
pages of supposedly artistic (?) designs— three of which are really 
pretty. The January number was just as bad, if anything, a 
little worse. 

If any one had given me * * * I would have allowed my 
maid to have had the sole handling of them. She is an expert 
dish smasher, so my teeth would not be ground down so very 
far before they were out of the way. Why not cut out all this 
Futurist and Cubist stuft', and give us designs that are patterned 
after the leaves and flowei-s that the good Lord made. They 
are plenty good enough for me. Forty cents a month is not a 
high price to pay for an instructive book, but if I had to earn my 
bread and butter with the ideas I have gleaned from the Ke- 
ramic Studio lately, I don't think I'd eat bread and butter. I'd 
be down to Uneeda biscuit and no butter. All these art exhibrts 
and picnics are very fine to read about, but what your subscrib- 
ers want are ideas that bring in dollars and cents. For forty 
cents I can buy a folder of six designs, in colors, that are beauties 
and mioney-getters, and that is what the most of us are working 
for. In the^January number there is an appeal for a larger sub- 
scription list. Make the magazine worth while — every page 
full of something worth while— not conventionaUzed pumpkins, 
roosters and squashes, and the subscription list will take care of 
itself." 

Now that's the sort of letter we like to get, a good, smash- 



ing, honest blow from the shoulder. It matters little that the 
fault generally lies with the readers when they are unable to ex- 
tract ideas from the pages of Keramic Studio. The truth that 
comes home to us is that we should not allow the entire contents 
of Keramic Studio to be over the heads of any of its readers. We 
shall try to keep this in mind and not give too much space to the 
graduating class. Although, to paraphrase our great Lincoln, 
while we may be able to please some of our readers all the time, 
and all of our readers some of the time, we can never hope to 
please all of our readeis all the time. But to return to our good 
friend's letter. Apropos of the "designs patterned after leaves 
and flowers the good Lord made," we are going to take the lib- 
erty of quoting from the manuscript of a text-book on design by 
Mrs. Henrietta Barclay Paist, which we are considering for pub- 
lication. 

"Art appreciation does not spring full grown, but is 
of slow growth and comes of association with the artistic in 
our daily life. . . The introduction of china decoration into 
this country was premature. . . we knew little or nothing 
of design, the foundation of all crafts. . . When represent- 
atives of old-world factories in which flower painting was the 
chief characteristic, came to this country, we followed blindly. 
. . so we copied and our pupils in turn copied us, and we 
became degenerate "copyists of copies." Then to paint a rose 
or a bunch of grapes 'so naturally that it could be picked,' was 
our highest ambition." 

"There is little in nature that is ready made to the hand of 
the artist. A masterpiece of art is what it is by virtue of some- 
thing which was not in the natural motif, but in the artist's 
treatment of it." — Louis Day. 

"The designer in the application of his art to material use 
must put away from him all the allurements of imitative natu- 
ralism, except so far as it may be subordinated to the effect and 
purpose of the whole." — Walter Crane. 

"As designers we will of course appeal largely to nature for 
inspiration. To the artist, nature has hidden meanings not re- 
vealed to the untrained mind. . . We must remember that 
the function of art is to represent and suggest, but not to i'tni- 
tate." 

"People are gr-owing away from the picture book stage of 
understanding. . . We can dispense with the natural motif, 
but with nature as our ally, our imagination is stimulated and 
strengthened. . . We must have our portfolio full of draw- 
ings and we may study nature . . but it matters little what 
the motif chosen, provided we have an understanding of the 
principles of construction, space and mass relation. Much as 
we love nature forms and hard as it is at times to give up the 
identity, we must acknowledge that the beauty of a design de- 
pends in the final analysis, not on the motif or pictorial interest, 
but on structural fitness to purpose and the relation of lines, 
tones and areas. Nature study may furnish thought for ex- 
pression, but design furnishes expression for thought." 

While it seems to us that even at the admitted rate of "three 

really pretty designs" to an issue, Keramic Studio is giving forty 

cents worth, even though the writer of the above letter can buy 

"six designs in color for the same price that are money getters," 

(Continued .anjmge 224) 




-204 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




PANEL, ADAPTED FROM THE JAPANESE— HENRIETTA B. PAIST 



PANEL AND TILE 

Birds and Pine Cone Branches 

Henrietta Barclay Paist 

OUTLINE with Grey or Black water mixture. Tint the 
whole with dull Neutral Yellow or Satsuma. After firing 
model branches with tones of Wood Brown. 

The breast of the bird is a soft dull pink (Violet of Iron thin), 
the middle values Grey, and the darkest values Brown. The 
pine needles Olive or Brown Green. 

The shadowy branch in the background of the tile is Gi-ey. 
In the long narrow panel, the wings of the biixls are touched in 
the lightest parts with Yellow. The beaks of the birds also have 
a thin wash of Yellow over the Grey. A third fire may be nec- 
essary to produce the values as shown. 

HOW TO ENLARGE A DESIGN 

Jessie M. Bard 

WE will use the plate design by A. W. Heckman on page 135 
of the January, 1914, Keramic Studio, as an illustration. 
The same principle applies whether the design is made larger or 
smaller, so we will only give the instruction for enlarging. 

Decide on the width of the border you wish. 

It should be in good proportion to the space left in the cen- 
ter of the plate. Then decide how far apart you wish the gi-oups 
of flowers to be, they should not be so close together that they 
seem crowded, nor so far apart that they have no relation to 
each other. Divide the plate into as many sections as the width 
of your gfoups will allow. 

The two bands or horizontal stem lines in the border are 
placed next. Take a naiTow strip of flexible paper and measure 
from the edge of the plate to the inner or third line from the 
edge, and place a pencil mark on the paper opposite the third 
line and measure this space into the width of the border and you 
will find that it is just one-third the width of the border, so di- 
vide the width of the border on your plate into thirds and draw 
the line around the plate with a gauge or any other method you 
are in the habit of using. It is best to draw in all around the 
plate so you will be sure to get it even and you can erase the line 
where the design is to be. 

The distance for the second line can be gauged with the eye 
and drawn in. 

The top of the large flower comes just half-way between 
the space from the edge of the plate to the two stem lines, so di- 
vide that space in half over one of the division lines of the plate. 

The space from the top of the flower to the inner border line 
or the fourth line from the edge of the plate is the same as the 
width of the three flowers. Find the width of this space on your 
plate from the mark you placed there for the top of the large 
flower, using the piece of paper, and mark off the space on the 
plate, placing the center of it over the division line. 

Measure the length of your large flower and flnd what com.- 
parison it is to the length of the design and you will find that it 
is just half the length of the design, so divide the space on the 
plate from the top of the flower in half, then find the width of 
flower which is the same as the length, and mark that on the 
plate. Draw a circle for the boundary of the flower through 
these marks and then the detail of the design can be drawn in 
from the circle; if the detail is drawn fii'st it will be much harder 
to keep the form; ahvays work in as simple a way as possible. 

Next, take half the width of the large flower and measure 
the small flower from that; you will find that it reaches the small 
leaves at the sides, so draw a circle for the small flower, leaving 
the small space between the leaves and flower. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



205 



The size of the small leaves can be gauged with the eye and 
drawn in. 

Draw the line for the large leaves under the flowers; notice 
that they follow the circle of the small flowers, forming almost 
a complete semi-circle. 

The division line will form the center stem at the bottom 
and the other two stems can be drawn in by watching the width 
of the space between the stems. 

Make a careful tracing of the half of the design which you 
have drawn, including the division line, and then fold the paper 
on the line and trace the other half of the design from the paper. 

For the center design draw a circle around the design in the 
magazine and then draw one the size you wish for the plate, and 
proceed to measure the different spaces as related to each other 
as we did in the border. 

Always begin with the main part of the design or the center 
of interest, which is the large flower in this design. 

Remember — all measurements are taken in proportion to 
some other part of the design. 

Block in the design at first ; do not draw in any more detail 
than possible, but see things in simple forms, as we did with the 
circle around the flowers, and above all, watch the width of the 
spaces between the different parts of the design; for example, 
the space betwen the two horizontal stem lines, it is the same 
width all the way; do not make it wider in some places than 
others. Watch the width of all spaces where one part of a de- 



sign fits up to another; for example, where the large leaves fit 
up to the large flower, if the space between the two becomes 
wider at the end the leaf will seem to draw away from the flower 
and will not have the feeling of being held together as a whole, 
as it does in this design. 

Too much attention can not be given to this matter, so 
watch the width of every space while you are working. 

If -f 

PANAMA-PACIFIC INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION 

Exhibitors at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition 
may have their exhibits delivered right on the grounds from car 
or ship. The exposition has its own freight ferry slip, which may 
be entered by car floats bearing the cars with exhibits. The 
cars may then be taken to the desired building over the rails of 
the exposition's standard gauge railway system. The exposi- 
tion has also its own harbor and docks, where vessels from all 
parts of the world may moor and discharge cargoes. No trans- 
shipment will be necessary from time of first loading on car or 
ship. 

According to a recent statement of Director of Works Har- 
ris D. H. Connick, the exposition is eleven per cent ahead of the 
definite schedule adopted more than one year ago. All the ex- 
position palaces will be completed months before the opening 
of the exposition, on Febi-uary 20, 1915. 




TILE, ADAPTED FROM THE JAPANESE— HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST 
(Treatment page 204) 



206 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




\ 




PLACQUE, ADAPTED FROM THE JAPANESE— HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST 



THE original of this study was a Satsumaplacque, background 
toned to a soft old ivory. The bird is grey in the middle 
values, black for the darkest values, with a wash of old pink, 
Vandyke Brown or Violet of Iron, all over the breast. 

The leaves are in delicate tones of greens and Grey Green, 
with a flush of Violet of Iron over the darkest values, the tree 



trunk in tones of gi-ey and the flowers a delicate old pink made 
with Violet of Iron very thin. 

The leaves and flowers may be outlined and veined with 
delicate tracing of raised paste covered with gold. This gives 
a decorative effect to the whole. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



207 



FRUIT BOWL AND FRUIT PLATE (Page 209) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard. 

OIL the two light leaves and the stem that leads from it 
down between the berries, also the outer dark band, and 
dust with 2 parts Bright Green and 1 part Pearl-Grey. Clean 
edges carefully with an orange stick, then oil the dark leaves 
and the dark spaces around the smaller group of berries, and 
dust with 2 parts Water Green No 2 and 1 part Pearl-Grey. 
Clean all the work carefully and put in the remainder of the 
design except berries with Green-Gold. Outline the berries in 
Gold. 

Second Fire. Oil all border except over the gold and ber- 
ries and dust with Glaze for Green. Clean the color from the 



Gold and go over the Gold again. 
Lustre. 



Paint berries with Yellow 



BITTER SWEET STUDY (Page 208) 

Isabelle C. Kissinger 

BERRIES are Yellow-Brown and a little Yellow-Red, and a 
little Blood-Red and a touch of Violet for shadows. The 
center of berries that have burst open are Yellow-Red and a lit- 
tle Blood-Red for the lights. Small stems are Apple Green, 
Moss Green and a little Violet. Heavier stems are Brown- 
Green and a little Yellow for lights, shaded with Dark Brown 
and a little Violet. Leaves are equal parts Yellow and Yellow- 
Brown and a little Moss-Green, shaded with Brown-Green. 




PANEL, ADAPTED FROM THE JAPANESE— HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST 



OUTLINE the design with Grey for Flowers, water mixture. 
Tint the panel all over with Warm Grey and fire. Lay 
the branches with tones of Grey and the grasses with Grey 
Green the breast of the bird with a delicate wash of Lemon 
Yellow and the back, tail and wings with Grey. 

Flowers are touched with Old Pink on the under side and 
Yellow in the center. For third fire wash the trunks of tree 



with Yellow Brown or any Brown thin to warm them up. 
Strengthen the colors where necessary to produce the values 
as shoviTi, and model the flowers with enamel, white on the in- 
side, with dull yellow touches on the stamens and Old Pink on 
the under side. The enamel is not floated on flat, but modeled 
on, for relief here and there in a decorative way. 



208 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




BITTER-SWEET STUDY— ISABELLE C. KISSINGER 



(Treatment page 207) 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



209 




210 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




CUP AND SAUCER, BITTER-SWEET—ISABELLE C. KISSINGER (Treatment page 212) 






^ 





/ 5V 







.XV 



## «# 







BORDERS AND UNITS FOR BITTER-SWEET— ISABELLE C. KISSINGER 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



211 




Fij|JI(ia OR 



PLANTAIN LILY— LENA. E. HANSCOM 



(Treatment page 216) 



212 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



CUP AND SAUCER (Page 210) 

Isabelle C. Kissi7iger 

THE OUTLINE, outer band and the dark petals of the berry 
are Gold. 
Second Fire. Oil the broad band between the design sec- 
tions and dust with Dove-grey. Oil the leaves and stems lead- 
ing from them and dust with Florentine-Green. The light part 
of the berry is orange lustre. 

LOW FRUIT BOWL (Page 209) 

Isabelle C. Kissinger 

OUTLINE in Brown Green, using syrup mixture. Pad en- 
tire bowl with equal parts of Brown Green, Dark Green 
and Yellow Brown. Wipe out berries and paint with a light 
wash of Yellow Brown. Band on edge Green Gold. 

Second Fire. Paint leaves with equal parts of the back- 
ground mixture and Empire Green, making under leaf darker. 
Paint stems with background mixture. Pad the spaces in 



border with background mixture, and paint the small dark 
spaces heavily with the same. 

Third Fire. Tint the background space about leaves with 
mixture for leaves. Retouch berries and strengthen outlines. 
Go over gold. 

DOGWOOD (Supplement) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

PAINT a very thin wash of Blood Red over the pink tips 
of the blossoms, Albert Yellow and a very little Brown 
Green for yellow tones, Violet and a little Yellow for the 
cool shadows and Brown Green and a little Yellow lor the 
warm shadows. Leaves, Moss Green and a little Dark Grey 
shaded with Brown Green. Stems, Brown Green and Yellow 
and a little Yellow Brown added in the shadows. Background 
2 parts Pearl Grey, 1 part Dark Grey and a little Yellow Brown 
Shadow blossoms in background are Violet and a little Copen- 
hagen Blue, 




CHOCOLATE CUP AND SAUCER— BERTHA HERBERT Treatment by M. A. Thompson 



OUTLINE in Fry's Special Tinting Oil. Dust Finsihing 
Brown. Fire. Second Fire^-Oil background, pad 
evenly until tacky. Let stand eight or ten hours. Dust 
one part Yellow Brown, one part Ivory Glaze. Oil darker 
parts of design, dust one part Meissen Brown, one part Yellow 



Brown, one-fourth Finishing Brown. Oil medium tone of 
Grey in design, dust one part Carnation, one-sixth Blood Red, 
one-eighth Albert Yellow. Lightest parts of design, handle 
and knob of lid in Mat Gold. Third Fire— Retouch design 
where necessary. Apply Gold again. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



213 



D 

O 

o 

o 
o 

I 




214 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




NIGHTSHADE— M. H. WATKEYS 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



215 




m\ 




■■■■■■■■I m^mmFi^m^^m^.*^mi « h| h| aHn ^^ 

i|si5i5lBV2dilKi^ 







CONVENTIONAL SUGGESTIONS FOR NIGHTSHADE— M. H. WATKEYS 

Oil berries and dust with Deep Ivory and a little Yellow Red. Oil leaves and dust with Floi'entine Green. Oil stems and 
dust with one-half Mode and Ivory Glaze. Bands are Green Gold and the background in borders is White Gold. 



216 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



NIGHTSHADE (Page 214) 

M. H. Watkeys 

OUTLINE with Black and a little Blood-red. Berries, Yel- 
low Red and a little Yellow Brown and Apple Green; add 
a little Blood Red for the shadows. Leaves are Apple Green, 
Moss Green and shaded with Dark Green. Stems of berries, 
Yellow Brown, a little Dark Green and a touch of Black. Stems 
of leaves, Moss Green. Background is Pearl Grey and a little 
Grey Yellow. 

NARCISSUS (Page 217) 

J. P. Baker 

FLOWERS are white. Sketch in the design and paint in 
background around them, use a shaded background and 
have the clearest colors around the flowers; use a delicate Yel- 
low, Violet, Apple Green and add Violet to the Apple Green to- 
ward the bottom; Shading Green may also be used. Shadows 
in flowers are Lemon Yellow or Yellow for Mixing and a little 
Violet, and in the darker shadows add a very little Brown 
Green. Centers of flowers are Yellow shaded with a little Yel- 



low Brown. Leaves are Apple Green and a little Yellow toward 
the top and shaded with Shading Green and Brown Green. 

PLANTAIN LILY (Page 211) 

Lena E. Hanscom 

WHETHER this drawing is treated in a conventional or a 
naturalistic manner the tones are perfectly flat. Out- 
line with India ink. 

Oil the light flowers and dust with Violet No. 1 two parts 
and Pearl Grey one part. Oil darker flowers and dust with 
Violet No. 2 three parts and Pearl Grey one part. The stamens 
and pistil may be left white, or dusted very lightly with Apple 
Green one part and Pearl Grey one part. Dust the anthers with 
Finishing Brown and Royal Purple, one part of each. 

For the lighter leaves, dust the face of the leaf with Grey 
Green and the back with Moss Green and Pearl Grey, one part 
of each. For the dark leaves, dust the face with Olive Green, 
Royal Green and Shading Green, one part of each, and the 
back with Moss Green, two parts, and Olive Green one part. 

The stems and bracts are the same as the leaves. 




VASE, NIGHTSHADE— M. H. WATKEYS 



OUTLINE with Black, bands are gold and background of 
border is Silver or White Gold. 
Second Fire — Paint berries with Yellow Red and Yellow 
Brown and shade with Blood Red. Leaves, Moss Green and 



Apple Green for light ones and Dark Green added for the 
dark ones. Stems, Yellow Brown and a little Dark Green. 
An Ivory background may be used if one is desired. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



2\7 




NARCISSUS— JANE PONTIUS BAKER 



(Treatment page 216) 



218 



KERAMIC STUDIO 








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KERAMIC STUDIO 



219 




IRIS— HANNAH B. OVERBECK 

FIRST Fire — Dust background with Gray for Flesh with a with a httle Gray for Flesh. Paint light parts of flowers 

little Violet and Black. Outline flowers with Ruby with Violet with a little Gray for Flesh. All other parts of 

Violet i. Outline gi'een parts with Dark Green No. 7 and flowers Ruby |, Violet § with a little Gray for Flesh, 

make line about the study with same. Paint light green Second Fire— Dust darkest parts of flowers with same 

parts with Yellow Green, other gi'een parts Grapevine Green mixture and[strengthen other parts. 









HIGH BOWL, IRIS— HANNAH B. OVERBECK 



Dust design with Copenhagen Blue and tint background with a Finishing Brown, with a little Yellow Green. 

Second firing tint bowl with background color. 



220 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




CHOCOLATE POT, IRIS— HANNAH B. OVERBECK 



Tint with Pearl Grey i, Copenhagen Blue i and fire. Outline design with Copenhagen Blue with a little Black. Paint 

all parts of design but darkest parts with Copenhagen Blue. Paint darkest parts with 

Finishing Brown |, Yellow Brown |. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



22i 




JONQUILS— JANE PONTIUS BAKER 



(Treatment page 222) 



222 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



JONQUILS (Page 214) 

J. P. Baker. 

PAINT flowers with Albert Yellow and shade with Yel- 
low and a little Brown Green for the delicate shadows 
and Yellow Brown for the darker ones; the dark centers are Yel- 
low Brown toward the edge and add Brown Green for the deep- 
est tones. Leaves, Apple Green and Moss Green for the light 
tones and shaded with Shading Green and Dark Grey. Back- 
ground, Pearl Grey and Yellow at the top and add Violet, Apple 
Green and Shading Green toward the bottom. 




VASE, IRIS 

Hannah B. Overbeck 

TINT vase with Finishing Brown and fire. Outline design 
with Finishing Brown with a little Yellow Ochre. Paint 
flowers with Yellow Ochre 2-3, Finishing Brown 1-3; leaves 
and stems Olive Green 2-3, Finishing Brown 1-3. 



ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

E. A. T. — Can a brush used in one make of gold be used for another make 
without cleaning? I keep one brush for gold and used two different kinds of gold 
lately in finishing some work. It did not fire loell and I fired hard as usual. 

2. Can usual powder colors be used for dusting if flux is added, and if so, 
how inuch flux? 

3. I fired a conventional design in Peachblossom and find it uneven in color. 
Can I use relief white mixed urilh a Utile pink and flux and go over it for a second 
firing, and if so, how much flux'' 

4 Plca'ie give me the diirrhons fni (he wqni and vmter mixtuie in outlining. 

5 Shoiihl Ihi hliiil iHiihm h, a mil n, in in niinoii niithne 01 heavier? I 

have seeJl son K 1 1 1 1/ nm mu ^n n m In Inn ill 1/ 1 ihli iiliiili Iiukl 

6 Do ynii I noil III iiiiij jinn 0/ uhtth I can qi I liubbuig s Phoenix gold at 
50 cents in halj-iloztn 01 dozen lots'' Do you know of any other make of 50 cent 
gold that is good'' 

Our diuggist got it 1ni his n iji nf his n Imli \nk hoiisi at 50 cents a box, and it 
was same size I pay bi l< nl\ Un Jhi hm// s Fhinnia 

7 Can two dt^ciuit vial 1 s 0/ gold In nii 11 d togeiha and used' I often have 
a little of each lift on the slab 

1. Yes, a brush can be used for the different makes of gold without clean- 
ing it before using, but not for the different colors of gold, as one gold would 
change the color of the other. 

2. Any powdered color can be used for the dry dusting, it will not be 
necessary to flux them. 

.3. When your color fires uneven it is usually best to paint over the light 
parts, matching the darker tones. This can be done so that the patching is 
not noticeable, if done with care. 

4. Grind granulated sugar and water together until it is very smooth, and 
to four parts M. & H. Outlining Black add one part of the sugar and water 
mixture. 

5. The width of the outline depends on the design; a heavy design and 
dark coloring would call for a broad outline, and a fine dehcate design and del- 
icate colors suggest a fine fine. 

6. We do not know of a firm selfing Hasburg's gold at the price you men- 
tion. All dealers are under contract not to sell it below tlu^ regular price. 

7. You can mix different makes of gold. 

MRS. C. M. C. — In overglaze decoration what is meant by fluxing the enamel? 
Should the enamel always be flu.ved before mixing with colors'! What are the pro- 
portions of flux and enamels? 

Fluxing the enamels means adding Flux to them. There are a number of 
different ways of mixing enamels, it depends on what enamel you use and how 
much color is used as to whether they need fluxing or not. The proportions 
for a fight enamel are 1 part Hard White Enamel, 4 i)arts Relief White and a 
pinch of Flux, and add the color you wish. 

MISS S. M. F. — Can you tell me where I can gel good practical sha/ics of 
chinn, such as tea-sets, howls, etc., in Satsmnn and Sedji ware? 

You maj' apply to Burley, Maurer, Wynne, or any of the big dealers 
in white china. 

MRS. J. J. F. — How is Lavender Compound made, and where bought, and 
can I not coinpound it? Whose make is it? 

Druggists claim Lavender Compound is made of Oil of Lavender diluted 
with alcohol, but we have tried it without success. It can be bought at a dfug 
store. Your druggist would probably order it if he does not cany it. Ask for 
Lavender Compound for technical purposes. 

A/7i',S'. ./. /.. S.—ln i/oiir Deniiiher l\)\:'> ixsur, tii iinsii-r.r In a cornypunilnd's 
question inn jinijc i:i()) in your lUnctioiio fur niixiiiij niniinl ymi m/;/ Ihr sninr mix- 
ture an ilvsvribrd for china can be used on Belleek and SiU-suma by uidng a little 
more of Ihr munni. I ivould infer more Hancock's Hard Enamel a;id not so 
much I\I. & H. Rilicf While, or less than four parts; and further, you say, the same 
proportions can be used by using the Tnedium enamel. That is apart I do not un- 
derstand. To what medium enamel do you refer? I have been using an enamel 
■mixed with Fal-oil and which is claimed to have been thoroughly tested, bid it chips; 
not alwa/r'-, bnl rrry frequently. If there is any ivay of getting around chipping 
I would like to I,- now it. 

2. Also can you tell me where I could obtain information and instructions 
on "Acid Etched Borders" and buy materials for same? 

1 . Use more of Hancock's enamel, about 2 parts. Medium enamel means 
one that is fluxed more than the Hard Enamel ; some makes arc marked medium 
The cause of enamels chipping off is often because too much oil has been used, 
or if they have not been mixed properly. 

2. You will find an article on acid etched work in Keramic Studio, July, 
1911. The turpentine asphaltum can be bought at a hardware store and the 
hydrofluoric acid from a drug store. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



223 




LOW BOWL, IRIS— HANNAH B.^OVERBECK 



Dust background with Grey for Flesh. Paint small squares Imperial Ivory with a little Grey for Flesh. Paint band and rest 
of design Baby Blue with a little Grey for Flesh. Tint lower part of bowl with Grey for Flesh with a little Baby Blue. 



S UBSCRIBER — Can you give any information concerning Paul de Long- 
pre, and if he has lorillen a bonk on flower painting? 

2. Also can you give instrnction in photographing flowersf I have a camera 
and would like io know how to enlarge the picture. Mine is a 4 by 6 size picture. 
Or do you have to have a special camera? Could mine he made to do? 

1. Paul de Longpre has been dead for some time. His work had some 
merit, but was more commercial than artistic work. 

2. There is no photographing more difficult than the photographing of 
flowers. It requires a good deal of practice in the time of exposure, the use of 
screens and retouching of plates, besides taste in the decorative arrangement 
of the flowers. Only experience and taste will teach you the work. You may 
have your small photographs enlarged, but it will mean the photographing of 
the small photographs with a larger camera. It would be better to start with 
a larger camera. 

M. C. H. — How can I dissolve some gold leaf in Utile rolls that the dentists 
use for filling? I have had a present of sotne of this gold and I ivoidd be grateful 
to know how I could use it on my china. 

2. Can the photo of an old homestead he transferred on a china vase, and 
what would he the process? I have the plates. 

1. The gold leaf which dentists use may be dissolved in Aqua Regia, a 
mixture of 3 parts concentrated Hydrochloric acid and 1 part concentrated 
nitric acid. You will find the formula for mixing gold for china in '".-Vnswers 
to Correspondents' May Keramic Studio, 1912. 

2. F. J. H. Abendroth, 41.5 East Ninth Street, Kansas City, Mo., has 
advertised in Keramic Studio the transfer of photographs on china. You might 
write to him. 

L. L. — A light reddish brown which had a yelloiv glow was dusted on and fired, 
then grounding oil -was applied and primrose yellow dusted over it. The previous 
pattern was gone in some places where it came out of the kiln just as if the yellow 
had eaten out the reddish brown and it looked spotted and ugly. What was the 
cause? How can it be remedied? 

Yellow always eats up the red, especially if it is fired too hot. You should 
give it as hght a fire as possible and also add enough red to allow for its filing 
away. Your piece could be oiled again and dusted, and give it a hght fire. 

R. E. — Will you kindly advise me as to which kind of zinc to hum in fire pan 
of my kiln '.' /. /■'■'< ■-nol fi-07n the chimney? 

Can /' Ik; used over lustres without firing dull? 

Can 1 ■' mil! iji ages such as Crystalline and Y ellow Shell on glazed china? 

Can you tell me where I can buy biscuit for underglaze painting? 

The powdered zinx is used; it can be bought from a drug store. 

Yes, burnish silver can be used on lustres without firing dull. 

Matt glazes that are prepared for over-glaze decoration can be used on the 
glaze; we do not know the two you mention. 

If by biscuit you mean the clay for making pottery, it can be had from anj- 
of the large wholesale houses which carry artists' supplies. Or if you mean the 
pieces ready to be decorated, you will find it in most of the larger stores which 
carry the white china for decorating. 



MRS. J. H. E. — Will you kindly tell me what I may do with a Belleek tea- 
set which I have put a design on with Hasburg's Roman gold and White gold? 
The gold does not look right and the silver is just a dull grey and will not burnish 
at cdl. 

Your set is evidently over-fired. Never use Roman gold on Belleek, as it 
over-fires too easily; use only unfluxed gold. If it is not too badly over-fired 
you can go over the Roman gold with the unfluxed and put on another wash of 
the White Gold, and give it a very light fire, for it over-fires very easily after it 
has once been over-fired. 

H. 0. J. — What colors look hestonSeji ware and how do you fire it? Also 
the .same of Satsuma? 

Do you boil the Satsuma ware in tea before painting? 

What is the best way to outline in gold? Can it he done with a pen and how? 

Does the china eraser remove colors fired on? 

Can English grounding oil he used for dusting in bands or small places 

Can you put on paint and lustre for the same fire, providing one is not upon 
the other? 

Flowers on a hoiol can he gone over ivith a light lustre can they not 

I have been outlvtmig the china with color mixed with sugar and toater and 
applying the color for first fire and repeating .same for second fire. Is that all right? 

paints are cheaper. Do you consider it all right to order them 

almost entirely for my pupils? 

Water Blue and Bright Green dusted on. are good colors tor Seji ware, also 
soft yellow enamels. White Gold and Green Gold, any colors can be used on 
the Satsuma, but cannot be dusted on satisfactorily. Enamels are most suc- 
cessful on it. Seji and Satsimaa are fired the same as china. 

Satsuma ware is boiled in tea if desired after the last fire. 

Use a No. 1 Winsor and Newton sable brush for outhning in gold, a pen 
is never as good as a brush, for you cannot get any character in your work. 

Yes, the china eraser removes colors fired on. 

Special tinting medium is better than EngUsh grounding oil for dusting, 
the latter is too heavy an oil. 

You can put paint and lustre on for the same fire if you are careful not to 
get anything into the lustre. 

It depends on the color of the flowers on the bowl whether light lustre will 
affect them. A light lustre over dark flowers has no effect. 

It is all right to use the sugar and water outline as you have been doing. 

We cannot in this magazine discuss the merits of the different makes of 
colors. They are all advertised in llie magazine and it is for you to decide; if 
a cheaper color seems to you after testing it to be as good as a higher priced 
one, get the cheaper one. 

C. B. — Is Green Gold Bronze added to Roman Gold in mixing with oils, etc., 
the correct thing to use for Green Gold? I make my own gold and wrote Sariorius, 
N. Y., for Green Gold Flux and they .sent me Green Gold Bronze, saying that was 
what they used. 

Green Gold can be made by using 2 parts Roman Gold and 1 part White 
Gold. We do not know about the Bronze. You might make a test of it or 
write to the fu-m in regard to it. 



224 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




"^^. 



^ 



MRS. H. L. N — / have started a dinner set with gold bands and monogravis, 
and a drummer' came through here and said they were not using gold and white so 
much now. Will you kindly advise me in this matterf 

A little color is usually added to the gold and white decoration now. Mon- 
ograms are not used as much as they were, though some are still using them. 

MISS S. M. F. — / have read so many times in Keramic Studio that ink 
tvould fire out, but I used Higgins' India ink and it fired like black paint. Please 
tell me if there is a certain kind used for outlining designs that imllfire out? 

The stick India ink is the best to use. 
fire in unless some color got into it. 



The Higgin,s ink does not usually 



y¥ . H. — Will you -please give me some information about pottery. I would 
like to work it up, but do not know where to apply for materials I have a Revela- 
tion kiln No. 6. Can it be fired therein, and at what temperature canipand to 
china healf I have painted china for years and it is only of late that I have been 
troubled with chipping. Do you think it might be owing to the kiln or the man.ner 
of firing? 

You can buy materials from any large art supply house. (See our ad- 
vertising pages.) The pottery can not be fired in the No. 6 Revelation 
kiln, for you can not get it up to high enough heat. The amount of heat 
required to fire it would depend on your clay, as the different mixture.s require 
a different heat. 

It would be hard to tell you the cause of the chipping, not knowing where 
your colors were painted or dusted on, or anything else in regard to it, but we 
do not think it could be the fault of the firing. You are probably applying the 
colors too heavy. 

S. M. A. — In the treatment of the fish design for plate by May B. Ilolscher in 
the January number there are only two fires mentioned. Is it possible to put all the 
various dustings 07i as mentioned in one fire? According to the proces.s- / was 
taught to put on gi-ounding oil, pounce well, after which clean off edges and dust, it 
wouldrequire five fires to complete design. 

Yes, it is possible to carry out the treatment as given . Use the Special 
medium for dusting or Special Tinting oil and apply it very thin; it is not as 
heavy as the grounding oil and does not need pouncing unless applied too heavy 

/j. M. F. — Can you name a good substitute for turpentine, one without the in- 
jurious rffriis (iiid disagreeable odor? I find that the Chin atiiLe advertised in the 
Kci-diiiir (S/;/(//() ('.s not much of an imjwovement. 

How do yuu outline a design in India ink in gray oullines? (See treatment 
of Talcum Shaker in March supplement.) 

Some people use anise oil as a substitute for turpentine. 
To outhne a design with grey ink lines, use the stick India ink and use it 
thin enough so that the line is grey. The longer you rub it the darker it becomes. 



(Continued from page 203) 
we would be loth to believe that all our subscribers want are 
"ideas that bring in dollars and cents." In truth, we know of 
quite a number who enjoy even more a "feast of reason and a 
flow of soul." But directly or indirectly we believe that every 
design published in Keramic Studio can be made into a money 
getter. "Let those who have eyes see, and those that have 
ears, hear." Of course, it is understood that all can not see and 
hear equally well. And finally, we will redouble the effort we 
have always made to "make the magazine worth while, every 
page full of something worth while," and as our jolly critic says, 
"The subscription list will take care of itself." 

The second letter to give the editor a jolt is fi-om another 
good friend who says frankly what she thinks, for which we 
thank her. The substance of the letter follows: 

"I certainly have a hard time to persuade my pupils or 
friends to take Keramic Studio. They say it is constantly filled 
with material which is of no earthly use to them.. They do not 
want something that is positively hideous, as they think many 
things in Keramic Studio are. Even the colored study is of no 
use to them. They do not want something from which 'they must 
work up their own ideas. You give scarcely anything in the nat- 
uralistic line, so they will not subscribe to your magazine. Why 

do you never give us contributions frortii and 

? I am not trying to run your magazine, but I think if you 

knew what people wanted you might be able to select your mate- 
rial in a way that would be more remunerative to you!^ I will be 
delighted to try to secure subscribers if I can find anything on 
which to base an argument. Of course you have numbers of 
letters telling you all about what they think of the conventional 
designs, because they think that pleases you, since you as editor 
are firmly convinced they are the only things desirable, but hun- 
dreds would write what they thought on the other hand, etc," 
(the rest we have already quoted.) 

This letter is a sad commentary on the unwillingness of a 
large majority of china painters to use their brain. (We say 
painters advisedly, decorators have to think.) Now while we 
hope and think that a large proportion of the designs in Keramic 
Studio can be used just as they are, we consider that the main 
mission of the magazine is to furnish material that will stimu- 
late the imagination and force our workers to do something on 
their own account. It is the only way to make of them inde- 
pendent workers. As to the artists whose contributions are 
missed, two contribute from time to time, one has ceased to 
work for the public, one we have asked in vain for contributions, 
and one has ceased to contribute because our sympathies are 
rather on the conventional side. We publish all the good nat- 
uralistic studies we can get, but most of the best workers nowa- 
days do not like to publish naturalistic studies over their signa- 
ture, and we have a hard time to persuade them. However, we 
consider that we have a very superior list of contributors of 
decorative flower studies and plant analysis, but as our corres- 
pondent suggests, their studies can not be transferred bodily to 
china, they have to be adapted. And this gives some people 
"brain fag." 

And, lastly, certainly we could easily select our matei'ial in 
a way that would be more remunerative. But much as we desire 
to make a good living and butter to our bread, there is some- 
thing we desire more, and that is, to help lead the keramic fra- 
ternity onward and upward. 



NOTE 

The Buffalo Society of Mineral Painters will hold an exhi- 
bition of their work at the Hotel Iroquois, Buffalo, N. Y., 
April 21, 22 and 23. The Club always has a very interesting 
exhibition and the public is cordially invited. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



225 





K. E. CHERRY 

CHINA COLORS 



STANDARD COLORS 

As Good as the Best 

SPECIAL DUSTING COLORS 

Different from anything else on the marl(et 

Send for price list in standard vials or in half 
vials. 

Special price list of all colors in bottles con- 
taining 50 grammes for use of schools or teach- 
ers having big classes. 

SAMPLE OF ANY COLOR, 5 CENTS 

20 Per Cent. Discount to Teachers 



V3 



It mm 

China Colors 



YELLOW 



toBINEAUPOITEJf 
SmACUSE.N.V. 



TRY 



OUR SPECIALLY PREPARED CLAY to re- 
pair muffles, will mend cracks perfectly and 
permanently. 
One lb. 60c. Half lb. 35c. Quarter lb. 20c 

Send postage for Parcel Post. 



THE ROBIN EAU POTTERY 

SYRACUSE. N. Y. 



Four Winds 
Summer School 

SEASON 1914 

Six Weeks, from July 5th to Aug. 15th 



Classes in China Decoration and Design 
under Mrs. K. E. Cherry 

Write for the circular giving all 
particulars and terms, which will 
be ready in a couple of Aveeks 



THE ROBINEAU POTTERY 
SYRACUSE. N. Y. 



226 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



THE REVELATION KILNS 



H. J. CAULKINS 




Especially well adapted for Glass Firing «• c. perry 

// china decorators would do their own firing with a 
Revelation Kiln, then figure what they had saved, the 
results would be another revelation. 



The most perfect device for public or private 
iUdio use, as good chimney comiection is all that 
required for perfect operation. The fuel, kerosene 
1, is easily obtained in all places. 





Being of tubular construction, so 
that a series of little firebrick flues form 
the wall of the oven, there is no chance 
for warping and going out of shape, as 
in the case of a flat brick wall. 



No plumbing, no gas 
bills, no flying back in the 
mixer, no escaping of un- 
healthful or disagreeable 
fumes into the room. 




This is our new No. 3 round kiln. 

The removable tubes by the door constitute 
the essential advantage of this kiln, as they make 
a complete circle of flame about the oven. They 
may be used or not, at the will of the firer, but 
are especially desirable when an even, strong 
heat is necessary for certain classes of work. 

Our Pottery Kilns are built on 
the same plan, with heavier construc- 
tion and Crane Hinge Doors. We 
have a smafl combination kiln for 
studio and craft work as well as 
school work, which cannot be surpassed 
We also make larger kilns, 
which will fire to any heat 
required for developing 
clay bodies or porcelain 
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in the history of ceramics 
these kilns have made it 

possible for 
t h e a m a- 
teur to de- 
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highest 
g r ad e o f 
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The radiation of 
heat into the interior 
is almost without loss, 
since the fire-brick 
forming the tubes is 
very thin. On the other hand, the 
fire-brick and heavy non-conduct- 
ing wall on the outside prevents 
the radiation of heat into the room 
so that the kiln can be fired with 
comfort. 



No. 6 (see below)— This is the most popular 

size for general studio use. No. 7 is for profes- 
sional 

1 jBHIb I'hese kilns may 

and gifWIB' J -xu • 

r , . ^i^WMk. arranged with a series 

factory. AB^Hk r i i ^ 

r, ■ mWWB^^nk 01 shelves to accommo- 
firmg. 






date flat glass. 






We also construct to order 
all sizes and shapes of kilns 
for all purposes requiring heat 
n manufacturing, for melt- 
ng, enameling, fusing, test- 
ng, etc., both in the open 
flame and closed oven. 




Send for one of our catalogues containing 
testimonials of the foremost decorators in 
this and other countries tvho make exclusive 
use of Revelation Kilns. 

If you want to know about the Reve- 
lation Kiln ASK THOSE WHO USE THEM 




H. J. CAULKINS & CO. 

Mannfactnrers of China Kilns, Pottery Kilns, Enamel Farnaces, Dental, and other big 
Smith Building, State and Griswold Streets, DETROIT, MK>H. 



heat farnaces 




Our store at your door 

, This is almost brought to you by 
our catalog, the new parcel post 
rates and the 201b, limit. The 
best Art Material and White 
China are found here. The 
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The new parcel post rates are: Under 150 miles, Ic a pound; under 300 
miles, 2c a pound; under 600 miles, 4c a pound; under 1,000 miles, 6c a 
pound; under 1,400 miles, 8c a pound, with one additional initial charge of 
from Ic to 4c on each lot. List of china and art material sent on request. 

Everything for Artists 

ABBOTT & CO., 127 North Wabash Avenue, Chicago 
Sellmg Agents for Revelation Kihis outside Cook Co., III. 

To Advertisers 

Advertisers' copy should be in our hands by the first of the 
month previous to date of issue. Matter intended for the May 
number should be in our hands by April 1st, if proof is desired. 
Advertisements on yearly contract basis will be repeated 
unless change of copy reaches this oflBice on or before 5th of 
month previous to date of issue. 

May copy must be here on the 5th of April to insure in- 
sertion. If proof is desired it must be here on April 1st. 

QUESTION AND ANSWER DEPARTMENT 

Subscribers will please note that no "Answers to Corres- 
pondents" are sent by mail. Every answer is published in the 
magazine, therefore, it is useless to send us a stamped envelope 
for reply. 



J^ittle/ Tlyn^s 
To Make, 



iRAMlC STUDIO PUBLISHING C 



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for Prompt Delivery 

Price $2.50 post-paid 




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1st, to accommodate 

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their clubs. 

If you have no copy of the 
Premium List send for one or 
look on the back of this Maga- 
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KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 
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Book of 
Cups tsB Saucers 




STUDIO PUBLISHING CO. 



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Published in one volume of 26 pages, it contains the choicest designs pub- 
lished in back numbers of KERAMIC STUDIO— many of which are now 
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decorators of china. The group of six designs for Cups and Saucers in Col- 
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as each design may be adapted to an entire set of China. 

PRICE $1.50 POSTPAID PROMPT DELIVERY 




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TIME EXTENDED TO MAY 1st. 



1 PREMIUM (pQ nn 
WORTH M''-'»"W 

Get wjether a club of 
TEN YEARLY 
subscriptions at the special "tlnh of 
ten" rate of $3.50 each, and receive 
your own subscription and one book 
your choice from the following Ust: 

Grand Fen Ceramics $ 5.00 

The Art of Teaching China Dec- 
oration. Class Room No. 1 3.00 

FJower Painting on Porcelain. 
Class Room No. 2 3.00 

Figure Painting on Porcelain and 
Firing. Class Room No. 3 3.00 

Conventional Decoration of Pot- 
tery and Porcelain. Class 
Room No. 4 3.00 



$5.33 



No. 6 



PREMIUM 
WORTH 



$4.00 



Make up a club of FIVE* YEARLY 
SUBSCRIBERS at the special "club 
of five" rate of $3.65 each, and re- 
ceive ONE COPY of our Class Room 
Book (your own selection), and ONE 
DOLLAR'S WORTH OF K. E. 
CHERRY'S DUSTING COLORS. 

This last by special arrangement 
with the manufacturers — for intro- 
duction. 



]\f p PREMIUM 
ilU» U WORTH 



Are yon a Teacher or Student of 
Oil and Water Colors? 

This premium will Interest youl 

The SIXTEEN NUMBERS OP 
PALETTE AND BENCH, the maga- 
zine founded by us and published 
from October, 1908 to January, 1910 
—full of valuable material by cele- 
brated artists and writers who are 
not often seen in print. 

The above set given post-paid as 
PREMIUM FOR TWO SUBSCRI- 
BERS to "Keramic Studio" new 
or renewal, $8.00 with order. 



$4.80 



\r_ O PREMIUM 
llO. O WORTH 



Keramic Studio Magazine Mailed 

FREE FOR ONE YEAR!! 

A premium worth your best effort — 

For a CLUB OF FIVE YEARLY 
SUBSCRIBERS, NEW OR RENEW- 

ALS, at ^3.65 each, we will give One 
Year Subscription to Keramic Studio 
worth $4.00, or One Full Set of K. 
E. Cherry's New Dusting Colors 
(16 vials) worth $4.80. (This last 
by special arrangement with the 
manufacturers.) 



SPECIAL COMBINATION PRICES UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE 

One Book and Keramic Studio for one year. $ 6.50 

Two Books and Keramic Studio for one year 9.00 

Three Books and Keramic Studio one year for 11.50 

Four Books and Keramic Studio one year for 14.00 

Two Books ordered togetlier 5.50 

Three Books ordered together. 8.00 

Four Books ordered together 10.50 

The Seven Books ordered together 18.50 

The Eight Books ordered together, including Book of Cups 

and Saucers 19.50 

Book of Cups and Saucers, and Keramic Studio for one year... 5.00 
Little Things to Make and Keramic Studio for one year.. $6,00 



$3.00 



]M^ A PREMIUM 
11 U. "T WORTH 

A little effort will bring yon a 
$3.00 CLASS ROOM BOOK (your 
own choice) 

Send THREE SUBSCRIPTIONS 
at the price of $4.00 each (new or re- 
newals) and choose from the follow- 
ing: 

The Art of Teaching China Deco- 
ration. Class Room No. 1 $ 3.00 

Flower Painting on Porcelain. 

Class Room No. 2 3.00 

Figure Painting on Porcelain and 

Firing. Class Room No. 3 3.00 

Conventional Decoration of Pot- 
tery and Porcelain. Class 
Boom No. 4 3.00 

Ktk fi. PREMIUM 
11 0. O WORTH 

Our premium for a NEW YE.ARLY 
SUBSCRIBER is FOUR COLOR 
STUDIES OR DESIGNS worth $1.00! 

We now offer until February 1st, 
1914, a premium of six color studies 
or designs worth $1.50 for oneNEW 
subscription accompanied by $4.00. 
MUST BE NEW 



$3.5?! 



$1.50 



\ e^ PREMIUM 
11 0« O WORTH 

SEND US 
ONE NEW NAME NEVER BEFOKii 
A SUBSCRIBER to our magazine and ' 
your own renewal, accompanied by i 
eight dollars, and receive a premium of; 
color studies and designs to the amouni 
of $3.50. State your choice as to Nat- ! 
nraiistic or Conventional so that ws ; 
may be guided in the selection, or yoa < 
may choose your own premium from ] 
our catalogue. The Studies and De- 
signs are accompanied with treatmcntg. 
Catalogue sent free on request, post- 
age six cents. Sample copy Keramic ' 
for introduction to the new subscriber 
10 eta. 



]W^ 7 PREMIUM 
11 U. L WORTH 



$4.00 



Premium of great mlae md wU! : 
soon be out of printl 

TWELVE NUMBERS OP 
KERAMIC STUDIO— comprising lb* 
eighth volume — given as premium 
(whUe they last) for TWO SUBSCRIP- 
TIONS accompau'ed with $8.00. 



PILL OUT THE SUBSCRIPTION BLANK, ENCLOSE WITH 
YOUR REMITTANCE AND SEND TO-DAY 



Date 
Please enter my subscription Ic 
to Keramic Studio— remittance encJosetu 
Begin my subscription with 

Namp 

Addicsi. 



. moiiths 



Though we do not aiiTertise to seU other imgBzinet, we will quote pnce m any combination wanted. 



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